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Neighbourhood Alert Reports

These reports are as received from the Police Cooordinators, and not edited by me
September 25, 2021

Fixing The Future

All too often, many of the problems in society are attributed to young people.

Young people are seen by some as having nothing better to do and are regularly vilified as being responsible for causing nuisance and disorder, as well as other issues.

I know this perception is incorrect, and young people should never be lumped together as a group to be feared. Indeed, teenagers are more likely to be victims of crime than perpetrators.
When it comes to youth, it’s incredibly important we get it right. It’s vital we tap into the enormous potential our young people have and steer them towards making better choices.

Thankfully, there are several organisations across Dorset which are already doing an incredible job of providing them with this guidance.

I am delighted to see the opening of two new cadets’ units – one in Poole and another in Weymouth. I’ve been fortunate enough to visit one of the units already running in Bournemouth and have seen for myself how young lives are being turned around.

I’d been invited to sit on the judging panel for a Dragon’s Den style event, in which cadets were asked to deal with an anti-social behaviour scenario, very similar to those ones which police officers and council staff have to respond to on a regular basis.

It was fascinating to hear their suggestions and to see them bounce ideas around as they attempted to come up with solutions.

The teenagers I met there were fulfilling useful roles in their communities, as well as developing confidence and life skills such as communication and team building which will stand them in good stead for whatever they choose to go on and do.

I campaigned for the cadet’s scheme to be expanded and it’s great news for young people in Poole and Weymouth that they will now have these opportunities. I look forward to visiting both new units over the coming years and I hope to see even more cadet units in the future.
But good as it is, this scheme will never be for everyone.

Future Roots is an organisation that uses one of Dorset’s greatest resources – the rural environment – to offer young people the chance to boost their wellbeing and reach their potential.

I visited the service at their farm near Sherborne earlier in the summer to see how the hands-on activities they provide, such as caring for animals, helps young people become more comfortable with who they are, build confidence and identify their strengths.

It’s led by Julie Plumley, a farmers’ daughter who went on to have a long career in social work and decided to create an organisation that combined the best of both worlds. She stresses that young people don’t go there because they are ‘naughty’ or ‘bad’ but because they need a safe and secure learning environment.

The traditional school setting doesn’t work for every child, and Julie told me about many examples of families and young people who have found the solution they were looking for at Future Roots. This includes teenagers who had been excluded from school, who had become known to the police, as well as those who were just unable to cope with lockdown. Their lives had been transformed simply by working among animals in the fresh air.

I also learned about other opportunities available for our young people when I visited the Dorset Youth Association in Dorchester recently as guest speaker at their 0-25 VCS forum event.

As well as being a chance for me to find out more about the association’s work to improve the lives of children and young people, it enabled me to connect with a wide range of people in the voluntary and community sector, to find out more about some of the challenges they face.

I am making commitments in my police and crime plan, not only to cutting crime and anti-social behaviour, but to putting our community first. That means making sure young people are not left behind, and by working with a wide range of partners we provide proper support for those who are struggling.

Fixing the future by addressing the problems our young people face is a big challenge which goes far beyond policing. But it’s important we do what we can to give them the right tools to make the right decisions.

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

September 18, 2021

The Search is on For The UK's Best Neighbour

THE SEARCH IS ON FOR THE UK’S BEST NEIGHBOUR!

People across the UK are being invited to take part in our annual hunt for the UK’s ‘Neighbour of the Year’ – a nationwide search undertaken in partnership by Co-op Insurance and Neighbourhood Watch.

Now in its fourth year, 2021 sees the introduction of a new category: Community of the Year. This award will celebrate the nation’s most outstanding community (could be a street, a sports club, a faith collective, or anything in between, either in person or virtual, such as a WhatsApp, Facebook, or Slack group) and the lengths its members have gone to to support others and make a real difference.

To nominate your Neighbour of the Year, Young Neighbour of the Year (for people aged 21 years and under) or Community of the Year, and to find out more about these very special awards please visit coop.co.uk/noty.

If you have any questions get in touch with us via enquiries@ourwatch.org.uk.


Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349

Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)


September 11, 2021

Community Speed Watch Day of Action Sees Over 300 Warning Letters Issued To Motorists

Over 140 volunteers who give their spare time to reduce speeding in their towns and villages have taken part in a day of action with 335 drivers being issued with warning letters.

The education and enforcement event saw 35 teams carry out 48 one hour sessions across Dorset on Tuesday 7 September with 58 per cent of those speeding being from Dorset.

Community Speed Watch is run through Dorset Police and provides an opportunity for volunteers to work within their community to raise awareness of the dangers of speeding and to help control the problem locally.

Teams use radar detection devices to monitor drivers exceeding the speed limit at locations agreed with Dorset Police. This equipment does not record an image so the volunteers record the vehicle details and pass these to the Force for their vehicle and driver information to be checked before a warning letter is issued.

View full article here:https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13217

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Last Chance To Have Your Say on Plans To Make Dorset Safest County

Dorset residents are being reminded that this is their last chance to have their say in a survey on policing and crime in the county.

Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick's survey, which asks people to provide information about what is important to them, is coming to a close.

To complete the survey online go here.

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “This is your chance to tell me and Dorset Police what you want us to prioritise over the next few years."

The Commissioner is preparing to launch his Police and Crime Plan, setting out a new strategic direction for Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner, including an overarching plan of making the county the safest in England and Wales.

Feedback from the survey will help shape the plan.

David Sidwick said: “The survey will look at my own priorities, which will form the basis for the plan, and ask what you think about them – do you agree with them and do they align with your own values?”

“Remember, this plan is your plan. Therefore, it’s crucial that we get your thoughts and opinions to make sure local policing remains dynamic and responsive to the communities it serves."

If the above link doesn't work, try this one, or please cut and paste https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/PCPDA into your web browser.

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

September 8, 2021

Warning To E-Scooter Riders After Four-Year-Old Boy is Injured In Collision In Bournemouth

Dorset Police is urging e-scooter riders to be aware of pedestrians and other road users after a four-year-old boy was injured in a collision along Bournemouth seafront.

At around 1pm on Friday 3 September 2021 Dorset Police was made aware that a collision had occurred on the promenade near to Boscombe Pier during the second day of the Bournemouth Air Festival.

The boy, from Christchurch, was taken to Poole Hospital for treatment to a suspected fractured collarbone. Officers have spoken to the e-scooter rider, a man aged in his 30s and from Lancashire, and interviewed him on suspicion of driving offences under The Road Traffic Act. An investigation into the collision is underway.

The e-scooter involved was hired through Beryl as part of a trial currently operating in Bournemouth and Poole, which allows individuals to hire an e-scooter from an official Government scheme and ride legally. These scooters have a reduced speed limit.

Privately owned e-scooters are currently illegal to use in public places such as pavements, cycle lanes, beach promenades or any publicly accessible land, such as parks.

The illegal use of e-scooters remains an important element of Dorset Police’s Operation Relentless anti-social behaviour priority and this summer the Force has carried out two days of action. Individuals were asked to sign an agreement that they will stop using their e-scooter illegally on public roads.

In total since the beginning of the year, more than 40 riders of privately owned e-scooters have been stopped and spoken to before being issued with warnings. Officers also have the power to seize e-scooters that are either found to be used illegally or involved in criminal activity.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Unfortunately on Saturday 4th September we had 3 bikes stolen from Two Riversmeet Leisure Centre in the day time. Please use a D-Lock when securing your bike as this is the best way to stop your bike from being stolen. If you have any information about this please contact 101, thank you! #5331 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice #dorsetpolice

Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

September 4, 2021

Bespoke Free Webinars For Older Drivers In Dorset

In addition to the national Project Edwards webinars for older drivers, Dorset Police are offering free webinars to Dorset residents.

The courses focus on issues unique to driving on Dorset roads and are designed to help the mature motorist to continue driving safely for longer.

The courses are free, but spaces are limited to 50 per event and residents are encouraged to register to ensure a place is reserved on the course.

We are holding three webinars in September:

• Wednesday 15 September - 2pm
• Thursday 16 September - 2pm
• Friday 17 September - 2pm

For more information, click on the following link:
https://www.dorsetroadsafe.org.uk/education-coursestraining/older-drivers/

To register on one of the courses, click on the following link:
https://attendee.gototraining.com/rt/1729829075903177217

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

September 3, 2021

Christchurch Police Giving Anti Scam Talks

Today one of our Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Officers attended Riverland Court on Stour Road for a crime prevention talk regarding scams. Throughout lock down we have seen a raise in these types of crimes. Please report any suspicious phone calls, emails and letters to www.ActionFraud.police.uk or 101.
#5331 #christchurchpolice #dorsetpolice #ActionFraud

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Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

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Your Voice Matters Survey

Dear Resident,

This is the last chance for you to feed into our NPT priorities survey. It will be running for a couple more weeks.

Our Priorities are set every 6 months, with a review and update every quarter.
You can view the current priorities on our webpages: Click Here


If you want to feed into the new priorities, to be launched soon, you can do so by following the link: Click Here


Thank you Email tracking gif

Message Sent By
Dom Smith (Dorset Police, NEO 5390, Bournemouth & Christchurch NEO)

August 28, 2021

Help To Keep Yourself and Others Safe Over The Bank Holiday Weekend

Dorset Police is reminding the public to how to keep themselves and others safe over the August bank holiday weekend.

Many thousands of people are expected to visit Dorset over the coming weeks to enjoy the late August bank holiday weekend and attend big events, such as the Bournemouth 7s rugby event, Quayside music festival in Weymouth and Bournemouth Air Festival.

The Force’s summer policing operation was launched in May and aims to keep visitors and residents safe during the summer by carrying out high-visibility patrols and introducing measures to prevent crime occurring in the first place.

Working alongside partner agencies, the operation focusses on some key crime types and issues that traditionally rise over the summer months.

A series of targeted campaigns have been launched including Operation Relentless, which aims to drive down anti-social behaviour (ASB) through high-visibility patrols in known hotspot locations across the county.

Other campaigns include the ‘Don’t regret your night out’ violent crime campaign, which reinforces the dangers of mixing alcohol and violence and the consequences for those who do. Operation Vigilant will see plain clothed and uniform officers patrolling Bournemouth town centre to identify individuals who may be displaying signs of unacceptable behaviour, such as sexual harassment, inappropriate touching and loitering.

Other initiatives are underway to target drink and drug driving, child sexual exploitation and county lines drug dealing.

Dorset Police’s Summer Policing Gold Commander Chief Superintendent Mark Callaghan said: “To date this summer has been very busy and we are continuing to work closely with our partner agencies to help keep people safe.

“Over the coming weeks we have some key events taking place and I am reminding people to make sure they look out for themselves and each other. Representatives from Dorset Police, BCP Council and Dorset Council, as well as the RNLI and fire service are all out there along our beaches and in our communities and can be approached by anyone who needs help or is worried about someone else.

“Our Force, as well as other emergency service colleagues, have already experienced high levels of demand this year with more people choosing to enjoy staycations in Dorset. We continue to ask visitors and residents to help us by using our online channels when reporting a non-emergency, rather than calling 101. Whichever way you contact us, your enquiry will be dealt with by a member of staff.”

Online options include making an enquiry online, requesting a call back or using the Report Crime Online function at dorset.police.uk. You can also email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk. In an emergency always dial 999.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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E-Scooters Seized As Part of Operation To Tackle Their Illegal and Unsafe Use

Dorset Police has seized 25 e-scooters for being ridden on public land or having been involved in suspected criminal activity.

The illegal use of e-scooters remains an important element of our Operation Relentless anti-social behaviour priority and this summer the Force has carried out two days of action.

Individuals were asked to sign an agreement that they will stop using their e-scooter illegally on public roads. In total since the beginning of the year, over 40 riders of privately owned e-scooters have been stopped and spoken to before being issued with warnings.

Officers also have the power to seize e-scooters that are either found to be used illegally or involved in criminal activity. Over the course of the summer, 14 have been taken away from riders for being used in criminality, with a further 11 e-scooters having been seized for having no insurance.

View full article here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13127

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Dorset Police Committed To Protecting Children and The Vulnerable According To Hmicfrs Report

Dorset Police is committed to protecting children and those vulnerable young people in our communities according to a new report published by the HMICFRS on Thursday 26 August 2021.

Dorset Police was inspected by the HMICFRS in April of this year to determine the Force’s effectiveness in its interaction with children and young people.

This included when children become involved in the criminal justice process, are admitted to custody or involved in wider police investigations linked to child protection and safety.

The inspection found that Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner are committed to protecting children and those most vulnerable young people in our communities.

It also praised the Force as effective in its professional relationships with partners and in its contributions to multi-agency working and safeguarding. In addition, it acknowledged the good work from officers responding to incidents involving children and those working in child protection investigations.

The report identified the following examples of successful service delivery:

Dorset Police’s child-centred policing strategy
The availability of 24/7 real-time intelligence researchers in the Force’s control room
Swift information exchange processes with children’s social care services and other safeguarding partners in the Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH)
Good quality investigations from specialist child protection teams
A good understanding of those children most at risk from child exploitation.


A number of recommendations were also made to the Force where developments should be made to improve service delivery and ensuring effective safeguarding procedures.

This included reports of children missing from home or care, longer-term problem-solving related to children and young people, working to improve prioritisation of online investigations and ensuring appropriate adults attend children when in custody as soon as possible.

Dorset Police Chief Constable Scott Chilton said: “We welcome the report and are pleased with the good practices highlighted. Dorset Police has worked hard with partners to ensure investigations and processes are in place to protect children and young people in all of our communities.

“Collaboration is required to do this effectively and we have built and commit to develop strong relationships with safeguarding partners.

“We also welcome the recommendations for improvements, of which we will fully take on board and are already putting strategies and training in place to ensure progress is made.

“I take very seriously any recommendations to further protect vulnerable children and have immediately put in place measures to address these recommendations.

“We will continue to work closely with our staff and partners to ensure we effectively address these areas and are able to deliver the highest possible service of care to the children and young people of Dorset.”

Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset David Sidwick said: “I welcome the report and although it preceded the start of my term of office as Police and Crime Commissioner, I am thankful to HMICFRS for recognising the challenges in this area of work.

“My office is working closely with Dorset Police leadership to ensure efforts to address the areas for improvement highlighted are done so swiftly, and I look forward to both seeing the Force response in the coming weeks and welcoming back HMIC in six months for them to review the same.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 26, 2021

Cctv Appeal Following Thefts from Shop In Bournemouth

Officers are issuing a CCTV image of a man they would like to speak to following reports of thefts from a shop in Bournemouth.

At around 6.35pm on Saturday 3 July 2021 a man entered Next at Castlepoint Shopping Centre and stole an ornament, before immediately leaving the store.

The same man is believed to have stolen items from Next at Castlepoint Shopping Centre on six different occasions between Wednesday 14 April 2021 and Saturday 22 May 2021.

The total value of items stolen is over £300.

Police Constable Clifford Ryan, of Dorset Police, said: “We have been carrying out numerous enquiries to try and identify the man who repeatedly stole items from the shop.

“As part of my enquiries, I am now in a position to issue a CCTV image of a man I would like to speak to. I would ask anyone who recognises him to please get in touch.”

View image here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13107

Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210107156. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Successful First Deployment of Operation Vigilant In Bournemouth

Officers from Dorset Police have taken part in the first deployment of their Operation Vigilant scheme in Bournemouth.

The operation ran in central Bournemouth on the evening of Saturday 21 August 2021. Operation Vigilant uses both plain clothes and uniformed officers working together to spot and intervene in instances of aggressive, predatory and intrusive sexual behaviour.

Through a variety of police powers, such as dispersal orders to make offenders leave the area, up to and including arrest, the operation aims to safeguard people who are at risk of assault or unwanted intrusion.

Officers on the ground reported that they were encouraged by not seeing too much behaviour of concern or large numbers of vulnerable people. However, officers did identify individuals causing a risk to several women on the night. A dispersal order was issued to one man who was approaching vulnerable women and girls on their own, and to another who was exhibiting unprovoked aggressive behaviour.

In a separate incident, staff at one venue called for police assistance and one man was arrested for inappropriate touching. Officers were assisted by venue staff on this occasion.

Neighbourhood Sergeant Mark Philpotts said: “Officers engaged with bars and nightclubs during the evening and this was a key element in raising awareness and highlighting suspicious individuals throughout the night. Dorset Police will be looking at continuing Operation Vigilant throughout coming weeks, enforcing the message that we will not tolerate violence against women and girls. Everyone has the right to enjoy themselves on a night out and officers will act when any vulnerable person is being put in fear or experiencing unwanted intrusion.”

Across the course of the evening, officers spoke with several people out on their own who were vulnerable. Officers had positive feedback from them as they were happy that the police were watching out for their welfare and reducing the risk to others in the night time environment. Two people were taken to the Safe Bus for water and to wait for taxis.

The Safe Bus is a partnership initiative between Dorset Police, South West Ambulance Services and BCP Council.

Sergeant Philpotts said: “The Safe Bus is a brilliant resource to have access to. With a collaborative approach from medical staff, police volunteers and security officers, it offers a safe place for vulnerable individuals in the night time leisure environment.”

At the beginning of the evening four licensed premises were given kits to test for drink spiking, along with posters to show the venue is aware of the issues and supports the operation. Dorset Police’s licensing team will engage with all venues to broaden the knowledge and understanding of drink spiking and the programme will continue in the central area of Bournemouth.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 21, 2021

Force Continues To Enhance Understanding and Its Response To Domestic Abuse

Dorset Police officers and staff have enhanced their understanding of some of the tactics used by domestic abuse perpetrators as part of the Force’s continued efforts to strengthen the service they provide to victims.

SafeLives, a UK-wide charity dedicated to ending domestic abuse, has worked closely with Dorset Police to help it understand its strengths and areas for continued improvement. As a result, the Force introduced the Domestic Abuse Matters training programme in April 2021.

The training is being delivered to over 750 officers and frontline staff.

View full article here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13086

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Making Dorset A Hostile Place For Criminals A Focus For New Chief Constable



Making Dorset a hostile place for criminals and offenders is one of the aims of Dorset’s new Chief Constable Scott Chilton.

Chief Constable Chilton began his role this week following the retirement of former Chief Constable James Vaughan.

He takes the reins having been Deputy Chief Constable for the Force since October 2020.

Chief Constable Chilton said: “I want to make Dorset as hostile a place as possible for any offender or criminal so our communities are safe and feel safe.

“Dorset remains an area of low crime, which continues to fall, but I want to ensure we are targeting those who wish to cause harm in our communities, while working with partners to solve problems and enhance the life of our residents as a result.”

Chief Constable Chilton, aged 48, grew up in West Yorkshire and first joined Hampshire Police in 1992 as a constable in Portsmouth.

His career includes working as part of international policing in Afghanistan between 2009 and 2011 as well as working on police reform across Europe.

Closer to home, he has worked across special branch, counter terrorism, police operations and public contact and strategic partnerships for Hampshire Police.

He rose to the rank of Assistant Chief Constable for Hampshire covering crime, criminal justice and intelligence before joining Dorset Police last year.

Chief Constable Chilton added: “We have a recently elected Police and Crime Commissioner in David Sidwick and he will soon be publishing his police and crime plan.

“This will drive our own priorities going forward, which will focus on collaboration and working closely with our partners and communities.

“Policing cannot operate in isolation, so those partnership links will be critical to managing demand and community confidence.

“Maintaining visibility and listening to our communities are also priorities for me and my teams to ensure we are engaging and making a difference to all of our force area.

“Dorset Police wants to make all of our communities safer, but that requires outstanding people. I take the role of chief constable with a team that has performed incredibly well in the last 18 months in often difficult circumstances and facing very high levels of demand.

“I know I am incredibly proud to become chief constable of a force that has some exceptional community resilience and strong partnership links. We must now focus on how we can make a difference to our rural, urban and coastal communities.

“Our communities should expect and deserve to be safe and feel safe and it is my commitment to ensure Dorset, Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole receive a first-class policing service.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Pilot Operation Launched In Bournemouth To Protect The Public and Prevent Sexual Offending

Dorset Police is launching a pilot operation in a bid to prevent sexual offences from taking place within Bournemouth town centre now that lockdown has lifted and there are more people enjoying the area's bars and clubs.

Using a combination of uniformed and plain-clothed officers, Operation Vigilant patrols will be carried out to identify individuals who may be displaying signs of unacceptable behaviour, such as sexual harassment, inappropriate touching and loitering. Plain clothed officers will call in a uniformed intervention team when such behaviours are observed.

The intervention team will then consider their powers of arrest, dispersal powers or search powers depending on the circumstances observed.

The operation will be carried out on a frequent basis and supports the national agenda for pro-actively preventing violence against women and girls. However, any sexually motivated assault or behaviour identified by officers will be investigated, regardless of who is involved or their gender.

The pilot will run for three months in Bournemouth town centre and, following evaluation, may be expanded to other parts of the county. It follows a successful similar operation carried out in Oxford town centre by Thames Valley Police.

Read full article here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/12978


Anyone who has been the victim of a sexual assault, whether recently or in the past, is encouraged to contact Dorset Police online from www.dorset.police.uk/do-it-online or by telephone to 101. In an emergency always call 999. Not everyone will wish to involve the police at first, but if that is the case please use the services provided anonymously by The Shores at 0800 970 9954 or www.the-shores.org.uk.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 19, 2021

Update Following Reported Dog Bite Incident In Bournemouth

A man has come forward following an image appeal in relation to a reported dog bite incident in Bournemouth.

At around 4.15pm on Tuesday 10 August 2021 a woman aged in her 50s was walking her elderly dog in a field at Hengistbury Head when a man with two Spaniel-type dogs walked past her.

Initially the dogs were on a lead but when he let them off they ran back toward the woman’s dog and were allegedly aggressive toward it. It is reported that the woman went to intervene and was bitten on the hand, causing a puncture wound.

Following an image appeal, a man has come forward and is assisting officers with their investigation. No arrests have been made.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Last week two of our local Neighbourhood Policing Officers attended an address in Christchurch where an elderly male had fallen off the kerb and was lying face down on the road. An ambulance had been called but took over an hour and a half to arrive. The male was 94 years old and had a head injury. Officers were in the area and attended to give first aid and have a defib ready just in case. Great to hear that the male is doing well and on the mend!

It's so important to learn first aid and keep first aid supplies up to date. This is especially true with the high demand the Ambulance Service are facing at the moment. You never know when you might need it! #5331 #6093 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice #firstaid

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Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)
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Neighbourhood Watch Launch Impact Report 2021

Following the success of last year’s first-ever Neighbourhood Watch Impact Report, we are delighted to share this year’s Impact Report for 2020/21.

This report builds on last year with data and case studies demonstrating the continued hard work and dedication, and impact of our 90,000 volunteers and 2.3 million household members.

The report demonstrates how we are achieving each of our three ambitions within our 5-year strategy, which we embarked upon last year, namely being:

the authoritative voice on community-based crime prevention
the most popular gateway for citizens to engage in their locality
a recognised contributor to community health and wellbeing.

In addition to preventing crime and the fear of crime, we have made a significant impact in supporting communities, especially through the Covid-19 challenges.

As many charities have experienced, we have adapted the way we work and learned new ways to improve our services to serve our communities better. Whilst the restrictions have been relaxed over the Summer, we know we are not yet through these difficult times, and our role within communities is still just as much in demand as it was at the start of the pandemic.

None of the work we do would have been possible without people like you who support the work we do and the values we stand for. We want to thank you for your ongoing, unwavering support.

Visit ourwatch.org.uk/impact to download the report.

Let’s stay connected!
John Hayward-Cripps, CEO Neighbourhood Watch Network

Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349

Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)

August 16, 2021

Help Us Reduce Our Emergency Calls This Summer

Over the summer months, the number of 999 Emergency calls received by Dorset Police increases. Already this summer the force has seen a significant increase – in July we received 12,480 calls to 999 Emergency, this is a 7% increase compared with the same time last year.

On average a 999 Emergency call takes around 7 minutes to resolve. Before ending the call, the contact centre always makes sure the caller is safe and help has been arranged.

Each day we also receive calls to 999 Emergency which are for non-emergency reasons. These can be to ask questions, report non-emergency issues and even hoax calls. Answering these calls prevents us helping someone in a real emergency.

Genuine 999 calls are assessed to make sure that we are prioritising all our incidents. Within the Force Command Centre, we are constantly reviewing and balancing our response to 999 demand, to determine whether some 999 calls are in fact not emergencies and to make sure we are responding to calls with the highest emergency need first.

As part of this year’s summer contacting the police campaign, we are reminding our communities about when they should contact the police in an emergency and what to do if they dial 999 by mistake.

When to call 999 Emergency

It is important everyone understands when to call 999 Emergency.

Only dial 999 Emergency if:

Life is at threatened
People are injured
Offenders are nearby
Immediate action is required to save lives, stop injury, or catch criminals.


If you need to speak to the police for any other reasons, please use one of our online non-emergency contact channels or call 101.

What to do if you call 999 by mistake?

Unfortunately, we also receive calls to 999 Emergency which have been made by mistake.
These calls often happen by accident when a child is playing with a smartphone or when an unlocked phone is in a pocket or bag.

If you do dial 999 Emergency by mistake – don’t hang up, please speak to the operator, and tell them you are safe before ending the call.

We log every call, so if you hang up, we must then call you back to make sure you are safe which takes additional time and may prevent us from responding to other 999 calls.

To support the campaign, we have designed a poster to help people understand when to call 999 Emergency. We would be grateful if you could support the campaign by printing the poster and displaying it in your local communities.

We also have other resources available around the different non-emergency ways to contact the police, if you would like any of these please visit the resources page on our website.

If you require a large quantity of printed posters, please email: engagementandbrandcommuications@devonandcorwnall.pnn.police.uk

Thank you for your support.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Dorset Police Chief Constable To Retire After 30-Year CareerDorset Police Chief Constable To Retire After 30-Year Career

Dorset Police Chief Constable James Vaughan QPM is to retire from his role after 30 years in policing.

Chief Constable Vaughan will leave the job at the end of this week, Friday 13 August 2021, after a long and distinguished career of public service.

Chief Constable Vaughan began his policing career as a beat constable in his home town of Chippenham, Wiltshire, in 1991. He has worked across Wiltshire Police, Dorset Police and Devon & Cornwall Police.

His career has included various uniform and detective roles with major and serious organised crime, citizen focused policing and as a crime commander.

The last decade has seen him in the roles of assistant chief constable, deputy chief constable and chief constable with Dorset Police. He was also joint deputy chief constable across Dorset and Devon & Cornwall Police from 2017 to 2018.

During the last 10 years he has also been involved in and latterly led the National Forensics Capability Programme to improve and evolve forensics in policing across the country.

Chief Constable James Vaughan said: “I have been hugely privileged to have been involved in policing as a senior leader for many years and I leave Dorset Police as a force that is performing well and has some amazing officers and staff.

“One of the things I will miss most is the incredible police family we have in Dorset. I will leave behind some close colleagues, friends and many officers and staff I have worked with over the years.

“Policing has been my life for the past 30 years and it has been a whirlwind. Policing has many ups and downs, but that day-to-day adrenaline you feel as a police officer will be unforgettable.”

Chief Constable James Vaughan leaves policing after the COVID-19 pandemic of the last 17 months, throughout which time he has led on the Dorset partnership response to the pandemic.

Chief Constable Vaughan added: “We have all faced enormous professional and personal challenges throughout the pandemic, but I never fail to be impressed and incredibly proud of how Dorset Police’s officers and staff step up and do the right thing to protect the communities of Dorset.

“I will cherish many high points and reflect on numerous lows in my career. An undoubted high point of my career was receiving the Queen’s Police Medal from HRH The Prince of Wales in 2019.

“Lows would be the loss of colleagues and friends working within the Force.

“The last year has proved to me that Dorset’s communities are strong, caring and compassionate and I am proud to call it my home.”

Chief Constable Vaughan will continue to lead the National Forensics Capability Network until later this autumn, before taking a well-earned retirement.

He said: “I am looking forward greatly to spending more time with my family and taking the opportunity to indulge in my hobbies and interests.

“I have a twin son and daughter taking their GCSEs in the coming year and have a passion for sailing – so I’ve no doubt home life will be a focus for the immediate future.

“I will be looking to use some of the skills and incredible experiences I have had in policing as and when opportunities arise, as well as continuing with volunteering organisations I’m involved with and my school governor duties.”

Chief Constable James Vaughan will step back from his role on Friday 13 August 2021, with current Dorset Police Deputy Chief Constable Scott Chilton taking the chief constable reins from Monday 16 August 2021.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 12, 2021

Public Appeal In Search For Missing Bournemouth Teenager

Officers searching for a missing teenage girl from Bournemouth are appealing for information from the public to help find her.

Tazmin Thomas, aged 17, was last seen at an address in the town on Wednesday 4 August 2021.

She is described as white, around five feet five inches tall and of slim build with mousey brown straight hair with highlights. She was last seen wearing a light blue denim jacket, light blue ripped skinny jeans and black trainers and was carrying a black Adidas bag with white stripes, a bag for life and a bunch of flowers.

View image here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13023

Inspector Greg Tansill, of Bournemouth police, said: “While we have no information to suggest Tazmin has come to any harm, she has not been seen for a number of days now and we are keen to locate her to check that she is safe and well.

“I would urge anyone who has information as to her whereabouts, or who sees a teenage girl matching the description given, to please contact us immediately.

“I would also like to make a direct plea to Tazmin if you see this – please contact us and let us know where you are as we just want to ensure you are all right.”

Anyone with information or knowledge as to Tazmin’s whereabouts is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210125734.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Image Appeal Following Hate Crime Incident In Christchurch

Officers investigating a hate crime incident in Christchurch are issuing an image of a man they would like to speak to.

At around 4pm on Sunday 18 July 2021 the victim – a woman aged in her 40s – was swimming in the sea at Mudeford, close to the beach huts on the spit, when she challenged a group of people who were reported to be riding jet skis dangerously close to people.

A man from the group responded by being verbally abusive toward the woman, including making homophobic comments, and splashed water at her.

Police Constable Erica Weldon, of Dorset Police, said: “Dorset Police takes hate crime very seriously and we have been carrying out a number of enquiries into this incident.

“I am now in a position to release an image of a man we would like to speak to.

View image here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13024

“I would urge anyone who recognises him to please come forward. I am also keen to hear from any witnesses to the incident who have not already spoken to police.”

Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210114827. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Reminder To Keep An Eye on Your Belongings While Enjoying The Beach In Dorset

Dorset Police is reminding residents and visitors to keep an eye on their belongings while enjoying the county’s beaches to avoid becoming a victim of theft.

With a good weekend of warm weather on its way, officers are keen to ensure people don’t fall victim to theft and are issuing some crime prevention advice:

• If you don’t need it, leave it at home. Only take possessions you really need to the beach.

• Consider one of your group staying with your personal possessions when going into the sea or the shops/toilet.

• You can buy waterproof bags and pouches to store mobile phones, wallets and car keys while you are in the water.

Inspector Darren Harris said: “It is fantastic to see so many people visiting Dorset’s beaches this summer after a long and difficult year. One of the main aims of our summer policing operation is to prevent crimes from occurring in the first place and therefore reduce the chance of becoming a victim of crime.

“While we have not experienced a rise in theft offences along our beaches, we are asking residents and visitors to follow these simple steps to make life very difficult for thieves.

“Our officers and police community support officers will continue their proactive patrols this summer, supported by Community Safety Accreditation Scheme (CSAS) officers, council staff and the RNLI.”

You can find out more tips and advice by visiting: www.dorset.police.uk/help-advice-crime-prevention/home-property/. If you see a theft in progress, please dial 999 or approach an officer or member of council/RNLI staff.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 11, 2021

Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Really busy shift for Christchurch Officers today. A mixture of jobs such as missing people, siezing a cannabis grinder and foot chase for three male's causing criminal damage. A good days work! #5331 #5699 #OnTheBeatDorset

Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)
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Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Today we attended an area on Matchams Lane following a report of criminal damage to a fence. If anyone witnesses scrambler bikes in this area or anything suspicious please report via 101. This is now an area we have added to our rural crime patrols. #5331 #7161 #6093 #OnTheBeatDorset
#christchurchdorset #ruralcrimeteam

Attachments:
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Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)
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New Fund To Tackle Anti-Social Behaviour In Dorset

The Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset is delighted to launch a dedicated fund to help tackle Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB).

The Op Relentless Community Fund, has been set up to help community groups and charities in Dorset take action and tackle ASB in their local area.

The new grant is open to organisations that want to put in place projects and initiatives that reduce ASB and increase public feeling of safety in areas disproportionately affected by ASB.

Applications from £100 up to £5,000 are welcomed, the projects must address ASB and have a local focus.

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick, said: “This is me making good on my promise to take action and help all of those people who have told me that they want to do something about anti-social behaviour in their community. Its time to make a real, long lasting difference to our communities and work together to make our county the safest in England and Wales.

“I want to enable and empower our communities to help in the fight against anti-social behaviour and the Op Relentless Community Fund is a very direct way of doing just that.”

For more information, including a list of the criteria, or to make an application, please go here.

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

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Dorset Residents Reminded To Have Say on Policing

Dorset residents are being reminded that they have a chance to give their views on crime and policing in the county.

Members of the public are being asked to complete the survey which was launched last month by Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick.

Go here to complete the survey online.

The survey is being launched as the Commissioner prepares his Police and Crime Plan, setting out a new strategic direction for Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner.

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “This is your chance to tell me and Dorset Police what you want us to prioritise over the next few years.

“It will look at priorities derived from three years of campaigning and talking to the people of Dorset, which will form the basis for the plan, and now we need to check what you think about them – do you agree with them and do they align with your own values?”

Feedback from the survey will help shape the Police and Crime Plan, which will be in place by the autumn.


Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

August 8, 2021

Alert - Vaccine Passport Scams

Action Fraud has received over 700 reports from members of the public about fake emails purporting to be from the NHS.


The emails claim to be able to provide people with a “digital passport” that “proves you have been vaccinated against COVID-19”. These emails are fake, and the links within them lead to genuine-looking websites that steal your personal and financial information.

How to protect yourself:

In the UK, coronavirus vaccines will only be available via the National Health Services of England, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland. You can be contacted by the NHS, your employer, a GP surgery or pharmacy local to you, to receive your vaccine. Remember, the vaccine is free of charge. At no point will you be asked to pay.

The NHS will never ask you for your bank account or card details.
The NHS will never ask you for your PIN or banking passwords.
The NHS will never arrive unannounced at your home to administer the vaccine.
The NHS will never ask you to prove your identity by sending copies of personal documents such as your passport, driving licence, bills or pay slips.
Your vaccination status can be obtained for free through the official NHS app, NHS website, or by calling the NHS on 119.


How to report scams:

If you receive a call you believe to be fraudulent, hang up. If you are suspicious about an email you have received, you can report it by forwarding the email to: report@phishing.gov.uk. Suspicious text messages can also be reported by forwarding them to the number: 7726 (it’s free of charge).

If you believe you are the victim of a fraud, please report this to Action Fraud as soon as possible by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.


Message Sent By:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

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County Lines - No Hiding Place In Dorset

In May, just after I became the Police and Crime Commissioner, we started how I wish us to continue, with Dorset Police carrying out a week of intense activity designed to target and disrupt those involved in County Lines. County Lines is a term used to describe gangs and organised criminal networks involved in exporting illegal drugs into one or more importing areas within the UK, using dedicated mobile phone lines or other form of ‘deal line’.

14 people were arrested, more than £40,000 worth of drugs and £7,100 in cash was seized from suspected dealers. Officers also seized approximately 146 grams of suspected crack cocaine and 90 grams of suspected heroin with an estimated value of £23,600. Stolen bikes valued at £12,000 were also recovered. This was definitely a good result.

The Force also carried out welfare checks in order to protect vulnerable people who become snared into the work of these criminal gangs. The gangs are likely to exploit children and vulnerable adults to move and store the drugs and money and they will often use coercion, intimidation, violence (including sexual violence) and weapons.

I not only want to praise the hard work of the officers and staff involved in the week of activity, which saw such success, I’d also like to reassure residents that countering the threat posed to our communities by county lines gangs is an ongoing effort and one that is reflected in my Police and Crime Plan for Dorset.

There are two priorities in my plan, which will focus the work of the Force in this area, the first is to Fight Violent Crime and High Harm and the second, is to put Victims and Communities First. These priorities have been formed during the three years I spent talking with the people of Dorset about what matters to them, whilst campaigning to become PCC. I know how concerned residents are about the effects of drug misuse in our society and I know too that they want to see a difference in Dorset, with more enforcement, more arrests and more help for those who through no fault of their own become involved in County Lines gangs and I intend to deliver on those priorities.

I am intent on working very closely with Dorset Police, as well as a wide range of partners including both our local authorities, to make sure these gangs find it as difficult as possible to operate anywhere in our county. I want them to understand that Dorset is not a good place to ply their toxic trade.

If you would like to take part in my Police and Crime Plan Survey and tell me what you want us to prioritise over the next few years, please do take a couple of minutes and complete the survey at www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/PCPDA

If you think someone is being exploited by county lines gangs, call police on 101 or the free and anonymous Crimestoppers line on 0800 555 111.

Further information on county lines can be found at dorset.police.uk/countylines

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

August 4, 2021

Warning To Public Following Series of Rolex Robberies In Dorset

Officers investigating a series of robberies where Rolex watches have been stolen from victims’ wrists in Dorset are renewing their plea for members of the public to remain vigilant.

A number of incidents have been reported in recent days, including a robbery in Baiter Park in Poole on Monday 26 July 2021, an incident in Poundbury on Saturday 17 July 2021 and two further robberies in East Dorset on Wednesday 14 July 2021 and Thursday 15 July 2021.

Detective Sergeant Karen Penn, of Dorset Police's Priority Crime Team, said: “Each of these incidents is subject to a full investigation and we are doing everything we can to identify those involved. We are working with other forces who have experienced similar incidents and sharing intelligence as part of our ongoing enquiries.
“We would like to renew our plea for members of the public to remain vigilant, particularly if they are wearing expensive watches or items of jewellery. The victims in these cases are generally men aged around 70 or older and we would urge members of the public to talk to any elderly relatives who could be targeted by this kind of offending to make them aware of these incidents.

“The offenders, who are described in most cases as Eastern European women and speaking in broken English, often pose as people working for a charity and we would remind the public that a genuine charity worker should have no issue with showing their identification if required to do so.
“We would continue to urge anyone who has been a victim of an offence of this nature to report it to police and we would also like to hear from anyone who has come across expensive watches such as Rolexes being offered for sale in suspicious circumstances.”


Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210086480. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.

Message Sent By:
Linzi Berryman (Police, Alert Officer, Communications and Engagement)

August 3, 2021

Force Pledges Ongoing Commitment To Its Communities

Dorset Police has once again renewed its commitment to engaging and communicating with its communities to ensure a local approach to policing.

The Force has renewed local plans under the Neighbourhood Engagement Commitment (NEC) initiative so communities can communicate as effectively as possible with their local police.

These plans will be published on www.dorset.police.uk over the coming weeks on the relevant neighbourhood policing pages.

The NEC establishes minimum standards and common objectives that each neighbourhood policing team aims to achieve within their policing area.

Views and perceptions of crime are impacted by personal experiences and concerns within their local area. These NECs will ensure communities receive a local level response to crime, which is representative and meaningful.

The commitment, and the neighbourhood plans that flow from it, aims to outline how local policing teams will engage with their community through meetings, partnerships and social media feeds, as well as linking in with partner agencies to share best practice and good ideas.

The plans cover all areas of Dorset and have been developed by the respective local policing area commanders.

Chief Constable James Vaughan said: “Neighbourhood policing is at the heart of everything we do and building trust and confidence with our local communities is vital in helping us to prevent crime, keep people safe, especially the most vulnerable members of our communities, and bring offenders to justice.

“These plans will ensure our service is delivered at a local level where partners and communities can see and feel an outstanding service.

“It is vital that our communities have a voice, especially after one of the most difficult years in recent times. The way in which we engage with our communities changed dramatically overnight due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, our face-to-face engagement was affected by the pandemic, but we have worked hard to find alternative ways to remain connected with the public, such as virtual calls and greater use of social media and Dorset Alert.”

David Sidwick, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “The return of community focused policing to the streets of Dorset is one of my main priorities and will be key to the police and crime plan I am now developing.

“I believe it’s vital that people should know who their local officers are and should be able to communicate with them, and residents have told me this is a concern they share.

“I therefore welcome this important pledge from Dorset Police, and I look forward to working closely with the Force over the coming months and years to build on the Neighbourhood Engagement Commitment and ensure our officers are as close as possible to the people they represent.”

To view the neighbourhood engagement plans, please visit: www.dorset.police.uk/NPT

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 2, 2021

Crime Prevention Advice Issued Following Rise In Theft of Catalytic Converters In Dorset

Dear Resident,

It is now the time of year for the Neighbourhood Policing Team Priority Surveys to begin running, to help feed into the new priorities we will launch after the summer.

Our Priorities are set every 6 months, with a review and update every quarter.
You can view the current priorities on our webpages: Click Here

You may have already taken part in our survey at the start of the year. This helped us set the priorities we are currently working towards at the moment.

If you want to feed into the new priorities, to be launched after the summer, you can do so by following the link: Click Here

Thank you


Message Sent By:
Dom Smith (Dorset Police, NEO 5390, Bournemouth & Christchurch NEO)

July 31, 2021

Crime Prevention Advice Issued Following Rise In Theft of Catalytic Converters In Dorset

The Force is issuing crime prevention advice to motorists following an increase in catalytic converter thefts over the last year due to the rising value of the precious metals they contain.

Dorset Police data reveals there were 94 reports of catalytic converters stolen from vehicles in the county between January and June 2020. This increased by 368 per cent – 440 reports – during the same period in 2021. These thefts can have a real impact on victims. It is not only an inconvenience, but also disrupts day-to-day tasks, such as taking children to school and getting to and from work.

Catalytic converter thefts can also leave victims with pricey repair bills, increased premiums or even having their vehicles written off.

Superintendent Heather Dixey said: “Our officers are working hard to prevent this crime. A number of vehicles being used to commit these offences have been seized recently and our crime scene investigators are working hard to forensically link offenders to these vehicles and the crimes.

“Dorset Police acknowledges that this is a concern for our communities and we are doing everything we can to prevent it, but this crime can happen in a matter of seconds. We are asking for your help. We can’t stop this crime without you, so if you know something please help your community and contact us.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “The theft of a catalytic converter can have a huge impact if, like many of us, you rely on your vehicle. I’d like to reassure people that a huge amount of work is being done between the police and partner agencies to crack down on this crime, but people need to be aware that it is a growing problem.

“Please, be aware of the police advice to motorists about what you can do to reduce the chance of becoming a victim. And if you do see anything suspicious, make sure you report it immediately.”

There are ways you can protect your catalytic converter from thieves.

Think about where you park - If you can, park your vehicle in a locked garage. If this isn’t an option, then park it in a well-lit and well-populated area.

Park close to fences, walls or a kerb and avoid parking your vehicle half on the pavement and half on the road, as this may make it easier for thieves to access the catalytic converter.

If you are parking in a public car park, consider parking alongside other vehicles. This will make it harder for thieves to get close enough to get underneath the vehicle.

Mark your catalytic converter - You can mark your catalytic converter with a unique code that will relate back to your vehicle. This is done using SmartWater and is an incredibly effective way of preventing theft. SmartWater is a forensic liquid, which can withstand heat of up to 600 degrees. It can be applied to car parts and each batch has a unique code which allows it to be traced back to the owner.

You can report any information to us online at dorset.police.uk/do-it-online.
Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.



Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 29, 2021

High Value Watch Thefts

There have been a series of reports of Rolex watches being targeted in robberies, with incidents reported including robberies at the Ferndown Golf Club on Wednesday 14 July 2021, in High Street, Wimborne on Thursday 15 July 2021 and in Stanley Road, Highcliffe on Saturday 17 July 2021.

The victim in Highcliffe, a man aged in his 70s, was returning to his car in a car park at around 12.45pm on Saturday 17 July 2021 when he was approached by a woman, who took a Rolex watch from his left wrist. The incident left the victim with bruising to his left hand.

Police Constable Jim Perks, of Christchurch police, said: “This watch was of sentimental value to the victim as well as being expensive and we are carrying out a number of enquiries to try and identify the woman responsible for this robbery.

“We have had a number of incidents of a similar nature in recent days and I would again remind people to be vigilant and be particularly careful if you are wearing any high value watches or jewellery and are approached in suspicious circumstances.”

Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210114276. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.



Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 28, 2021

Public Reminded Where To Find Safe Spaces In Bournemouth Poole and Christchurch

Dorset Police and BCP Council have teamed up to remind the public where they can find immediate help, emergency assistance and support if they are concerned about their own and others safety this summer.

Seafront and town rangers, who patrol the beaches and the town centre area of Bournemouth, as well as security personnel and police officers have all stepped up their patrol operations as part of the summer response plan. They are on hand to provide immediate help and support to anyone with safety concerns, including contacting emergency services and helping to find lost friends or family.

RNLI lifeguards and staff can also be approached, with their beach towers serving as a safe place to address concerns or seek further help.

Specifically for missing children, the LV= KidZone wristband beach safety scheme is running throughout the summer to prevent and reunite missing and lost children and vulnerable adults. Visitors can collect a free wristband from LV= KidZone staff, seafront rangers and the RNLI lifeguard towers.

Neighbourhood Inspector Darren Harris, of Bournemouth police, said: “We would like to reassure our communities and visitors that we have strengthened our working practices with our partner agencies to collaboratively step up resources in town centres. Local officers will be conducting high-visibility patrols in the area of the beach in the coming days and this will continue throughout the summer months.

“It is important for people to remember that we are here for them and there is a vast range of agencies working across Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch this summer to help keep people safe. The Multi-Agency Command Centre (MACC) in Bournemouth means that we can ensure we can get the right resources to help people when needed.”

Councillor May Haynes, Portfolio Holder for Community Safety at BCP Council, said: “Public safety is one of our top priorities and we wish to make sure that our visitors and residents are aware of how they can not only help each other, but also themselves in emergency situations, along our seafront areas in BCP.

"I would urge our residents and visitors to use these services that are in place when they require assistance, such as a lost child or anti-social behaviour. By calling at these locations, they will receive the assistance they need as soon as possible."

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 24, 2021

How To Contact Dorset Police

Anyone wishing to contact us with non-emergency queries or reports can easily access our online options – Request a Call Back, Report Crime Online and Email 101.

Report Crime Online
- dorset.police.uk/reportcrime

Report Crime Online is an easy way to report information to us or report an incident or crime. Simply record all the details on the online form then submit the form via our website. Our contact centre staff will receive the form, record the crime, and provide you with a crime reference number.

Make an Enquiry Online - dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/make-an-enquiry-online/

If you want to make a general enquiry, tell us something, ask a question or report a suspicious incident (not happening now) then using the online enquiry form is an efficient way to make us aware of this information.

Alternatively, you can email us via 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk

Report Anti-Social Behaviour Online - dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/asb-and-nuisance-communications/

Use this online form to report anti-social behaviour, which is not happening now. This information allows us to build an intelligence picture of what is happening in your local area to help and support our communities.

Request a Call Back - dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/request-a-call-back/

Simply complete the details on the online form to Request a Call Back from Dorset Police the same day. Request a Call Back can be used to ask questions, report non-urgent crime and receive updates on existing crime.

Alternatively, our contact centre staff are available to answer your calls, day or night should you still wish to call the 101 non-emergency number.

Remember, in an emergency, when life is threatened, people are injured, offenders are nearby or immediate action is required, always dial 999.

Every contact received about a policing issue is answered by a member of the Force Command Centre whether it’s through the online channels or by phone. So whichever way you choose to contact the police, #ItsPersonal.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Overall Crime Continues To Drop For Dorset Police

Dorset Police has seen a 13.4 per cent drop in recorded crime, according to new figures released on Thursday 22 July 2021, and has the ninth lowest crime rate in England & Wales.

Data released by the Office for National Statistics show the Force has continued to see a drop in overall crime for the fifth consecutive quarter.

The latest figures show that compared to the national data, Dorset saw a reduction in violence against the person offences – a reduction of 6.5 per cent in Dorset compared to an increase nationally of 0.5 per cent. Similarly, the Force experienced a reduction in sexual offences of 15.8 per cent, compared to a reduction of 9.2 per cent nationally.

Dorset Police recognises the impact of COVID-19 throughout the year and the effect the lockdown periods had on the reduction of some crime types. The Force responded to this and maintained a strong focus on the crimes that affect the most vulnerable members of our communities, for example, Child Sexual Exploitation, Domestic Abuse and County Lines.

Deputy Chief Constable Scott Chilton said Dorset continues to be one of the safest counties in the country to live and visit.

He continued: “We are now experiencing a very busy summer period in Dorset as a result of the easing of COVID-19 restrictions, the return of key public events, and set against the backdrop of limited international travel, and more and more people visiting Dorset for day trips and staycations. We have committed to resourcing the demand summer brings and working closely with our partners to ensure we continue to provide effective services to our communities and keep residents and visitors safe.

“The published data covers the pandemic in full and shows a steady reduction of crime throughout the year. It is a testament to the fortitude of our officers and staff in their response to the challenging policing environment they faced each day.”

The total number of crimes reported reduced from 54,176 to 46,916 over the 12 months to the end of March 2021, reducing 9.4 crimes per 1,000 of the population.

Violence with injury dropping by 16.9 per cent, compared to the national average that was down by 13.9 per cent.

In addition to the reduction in sexual offences, rape offences dropped by 16.1 per cent (compared to a national decrease of 5.5 per cent).
Public order offences saw an increase of 6.9 per cent, against a national increase of 5.2 per cent.

From Monday 19 July, Police in England have had a reduced role in the enforcement of Covid-19 restrictions. Many regulations have been revoked but the police may be called upon to enforce the remaining Health Protection Regulations. This change may have an impact on some reported crimes, particularly crimes that are linked to these regulation and some public order offences.

Deputy Chief Constable Scott Chilton said: “This 6.9 per cent increase in public order offences can partly be attributed to the increase in demonstrations that we have seen across the country in the last year and the public demonstrating their right to protest. Dorset Police work with protest organisers to ensure the maintenance of public safety and health.

I am proud of all our officers and staff, who have worked hard to support the public and keep our communities safe during this challenging year.”

David Sidwick, Dorset’s Police and Crime Commissioner, continued: “It’s hugely reassuring that during my first 100 days in office, we have official confirmation that crime rates in Dorset are continuing to fall.

“Residents should take great comfort in the news that we enjoy the ninth lowest crime rate in England and Wales, and these figures are testament to the incredible efforts of all the Dorset Police officers and staff who have worked so hard during a very difficult period. Obviously during COVID we have had an unusual year and crime patterns will have been affected - the clear need will be to keep driving down crime and anti-social behaviour as we return to normality.

“I’ve said consistently that I want Dorset to become the very safest part of the country, so these figures are encouraging and I look forward to working closely with the Force to ensure these numbers continue to plummet.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 22, 2021

Drink Drivers Targeted In Summer Crackdown

“If you are drinking, don’t drive and if you are driving, don’t drink.” That’s the message from Dorset Police as lockdown restrictions are lifted and more people are expected to be heading out to pubs and clubs.

The Force is urging people to take responsibility for their actions and not to risk lives by getting behind the wheel under the influence of alcohol.

As part of the six week-long campaign officers will be carrying out breath tests with those they suspect of drink driving, with offenders facing a minimum 12-month driving ban, an unlimited fine and a criminal record.

Dorset Police will be carrying out intelligence-led checks, which target road users who pose a risk on the roads with officers urging members of the public to get in touch to report anyone they suspect of driving under the influence.

Inspector Craig Tatton, of the Dorset Road Policing Team, said: “Despite long-term reductions, drink driving still contributes to over 200 deaths on our roads nationally each year and around 6,000 collisions where drivers were over the limit.

“During 2019 Dorset Police prosecuted 763 drivers for drink drive-related offences and a further 643 in 2020, despite lockdown restrictions and the closure of licenced premises for extended periods.

“There is no typical drink driver in Dorset – in the last three years the oldest person arrested for drink driving was 83 years old and the youngest was 16 years old.

“Alcohol impairs many of the functions necessary for safe driving; reaction times and spatial awareness are affected significantly and this is often still the case the morning after, depending on how much alcohol a person has consumed the night before and when they stopped drinking.

“It’s not just the driver who’s at risk, you could kill or seriously injure another person. Drink driving destroys people’s lives and those of their families. Avoid this happening by planning ahead; leave your vehicle at home, travel by taxi or public transport, or agree a non-drinking designated driver to get people home safely.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “With the interruption to the national summer drink drug drive campaign last year due to COVID-19, I felt it was particularly important that there was a campaign in place when lockdown restrictions were lifted.

“This campaign will not only target our most prolific offenders and high risk motorists, but will serve to remind all drivers about the responsibility we accept when we get behind the steering wheel, and the potential consequences when we don't take that responsibility seriously.”

Officers are encouraging people to report anyone they know are risking other people’s lives by getting behind the wheel when they’ve been drinking.

If you know someone who is a habitual drink driver please report them via 101, or if you know someone is about to drive under the influence please dial 999 immediately and give the make and model of the vehicle, registration number and direction of travel.

Download posters here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/12846

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Dorset Police Are Asking For Help In Tackling County Lines Over The Summer Months

As the summer holidays approach Dorset Police are asking local residents and holiday makers to know the signs of county lines and exploitation to help keep Dorset safe.

Superintendent Andy Dilworth explains: “County lines is a crime where a gang uses a dedicated mobile phone line to sell drugs. They often exploit children or vulnerable adults and force them to courier drugs and money. The “county line” refers to the mobile phone line which is the link for the drugs gangs to sell drugs.

“Dorset is always busy at this time of year with summer visitors enjoying our beautiful coastline and countryside. We know children and vulnerable adults exploited by gangs can get “lost in the crowd” during peak holiday season, which is why we are asking visitors and local people to know the signs and help us keep people safe. We also know that vulnerable children can be more at risk of exploitation by gangs during the long summer holiday as they are away from structured education.

“We are particularly asking for people who work in the holiday accommodation and hospitality industries, as well as taxi firms and bus and coach companies, to keep their eyes and ears open and, if they see something which doesn’t look right, to report it to us.”

Some of the signs of county line include children travelling long distances on public transport alone, paying for tickets with large amounts of cash or children with multiple mobile phones, tablets or SIM cards.

Superintendent Dilworth continues: “Please visit our website to find out about county lines and the signs to look out for. If you see anything that doesn’t look right, you can report it to us via our non-emergency channels or you can report it, 100% anonymously, to Crimestoppers.”

Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, David Sidwick said: “County lines gangs cause terrible problems in our county, not just by making drugs more readily available but by ruthlessly exploiting vulnerable and often young people. This is a problem I’m determined to tackle and will be a key focus of my police and crime plan.

“It is also an issue where the police need your help, so as visitors continue to come into the county please be aware of the signs of county lines exploitation, and let Dorset Police know if you see anything that concerns you.”

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

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Operation To Drive Down Anti-Social Behaviour In Dorset

Dorset Police has launched a new robust operation aimed at tackling anti-social behaviour in its communities.

Operation Relentless aims to remind residents and visitors that the Force takes a tough approach to anti-social behaviour (ASB) and send a very clear message to those involved that it simply will not be tolerated in the county.

Overall reports of anti-social behaviour have fallen in Dorset over the last two years. However, it traditionally increases over the summer months and tackling it remains a Force priority.

Superintendent Alan Setchell, Force anti-social behaviour lead, said: “We know from speaking to our communities and from public surveys that anti-social behaviour is an ongoing issue and remains a real concern to residents and businesses.

“Anti-social behaviour is a very visible form of disruption in our communities and is closely linked to how safe people feel. When it is persistent it can have a significant impact on people’s lives.

“The Force has a number of operations already underway to tackle anti-social behaviour in hotspot areas across the county. Operation Relentless has been introduced to allow us to provide a clear and consistent message that we take reports of anti-social behaviour seriously and it is not acceptable.

“We want to empower our communities to help us fight this issue and take the anti away from anti-social by reporting incidents of anti-social behaviour involving loud, abusive, rowdy or intimidating alcohol-related behaviour, drug misuse and intimidating gangs of people to Dorset Police.

“We know that there is not one simple solution to all the issues anti-social behaviour can cause. Each policing area throughout Dorset has its own dedicated plan to tackle such activity and officers continue to work closely with the respective local authority to identify and reduce incidents. This year we have strengthened our links with partners even further by working directly alongside them in newly set up Multi Agency Command Centre in Bournemouth that co-ordinates summer resilience staff to hotspot areas across the BCP area and in Dorset County.”

The launch of Operation Relentless coincides with the UK’s first ASB awareness week, which runs from Monday 19 July to Sunday 25 July 2021.

David Sidwick, Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, said: “Tackling anti-social behaviour is a major priority of mine and I’m glad to see the Force is launching a major campaign to robustly deal with this issue within my first 100 days in the role.

“I’ve spoken to so many people across the county who have told me how their lives have been ruined by persistent nuisance, and dealing with these problems will be a major theme of my police and crime plan, which I will be launching in the autumn.

“It’s also important people realise that many anti-social behaviour problems are the responsibility of different agencies such as local authorities, with a survey by my office last year revealing a great deal of confusion over who was responsible for what. I’ll be working with all of these agencies to make sure we get this message across more clearly, but in the meantime I’d encourage everyone to visit the Dorset Police’s ASK NED pages online where they can get more information.”

You can report anti-social behaviour at www.dorset.police.uk or by calling Dorset Police on 101. As always in an emergency where life is at risk or a crime is being committed dial 999.

If we are not able to deal with your complaint directly, we will give you advice on which local agency can help and how to contact them. The police and other local agencies have a variety of different powers to tackle anti-social behaviour. As a guide local councils have the powers to deal with:

• Abandoned vehicles
• Graffiti and flyposting
• Damage to public property
• Rubbish and fly tipping
• Noise, including loud music, noisy neighbours, parties, alarms, animals and noise from pubs and clubs

You can find lots of advice on Dorset’s dedicated anti-social behaviour pages www.dorset.police.uk/help-advice-crime-prevention/safety-in-your-community/asb/ or by visiting Ask NED here: www.dorset.police.uk/contact-us/ask-ned-how-can-we-help/

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Help The Force This Summer By Going Online

Dorset Police is reminding people how they can help the Force this summer by going online should they need non-emergency help and advice.

The timely reminder comes at the start of the school summer holidays as it is expected the number of people visiting and staying in Dorset over the next few months will increase significantly, and therefore the number of people needing to contact the police will rise.

Demand has already risen this week compared to last week with a 11 per cent increase in 101 calls and 21 per cent increase in 999 calls. Alongside this, the Force is also managing a 35 per cent reduction in control room staff because they either have COVID-19 or coronavirus symptoms, or are having to self-isolate following a request by the NHS COVID-19 app or the Test and Trace telephone call. Unfortunately this will impact on waiting times when calling the 101 non-emergency number.

Every contact received about a policing issue is answered by a member of the Force Command Centre whether it’s through the online channels or by phone. So whichever way people choose to contact the police, #ItsPersonal.

Superintendent Jared Parkin, Head of Force Command Centre, said: “We have already been seeing an increase in non-emergency demand during the early part of the summer and we are anticipating this will continue to rise.

“Our online channels – email 101, make an enquiry online, request a call back and Report Crime Online ­– are simple and easy to use and provide an alternative to calling. They can also be accessed 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

“Our Force Command Centre manages the majority of contact we receive as a force and we try to respond to every contact as soon as we can. The personal service you receive through these online channels is just as good as the service you receive when calling 101.”

David Sidwick, Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, said: “Making it as easy as possible for local people to contact the police is one of my priorities, and so I’m glad to see Dorset Police launching this campaign within my first 100 days.

“I’ll be working closely with the Force over the next few years to make sure we continue to focus on boosting communication between the public and the police, but in the short term I will encourage Dorset residents and visitors to be aware of the different methods they can use to report crimes and incidents over the busy summer months.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 21, 2021

Campaign To Raise Awareness of Personal Responsibility To Prevent Violent Crime

Dorset Police is reminding everyone to enjoy their freedom this summer, behave responsibly and look after each other to prevent violent crime in the county.

The Force is launching its summer violent crime campaign – Don’t regret your night out – as the country prepares to fully reopen the night-time economy following the COVID-19 pandemic.

A series of posters and social media posts reminds people of the consequences of overdoing it on a night out or at home with friends when the toxic cocktail of alcohol and violence are mixed.

In a bid to keep residents and visitors safe this summer the Force is working closely with both BCP Council and Dorset Council to step up resources in town centres via additional police patrols, as well as an increase in security staff at licensed premises and community safety accredited officers from the council. To meet the increased demands of the summer, the Force has strengthened its working practices with partner agencies following the creation of Multi Agency Command Centres in Bournemouth and in west Dorset.

Reports of most serious violent offences, such as grievous bodily harm and wounding with intent, have fallen in Dorset over the last three years from 252 in 2018/19 to 226 in 2020/21.

Chief Superintendent Mark Callaghan, the Force’s lead on serious violence, said: “It has been a long and difficult 18 months for everyone, and we have finally reached the stage where most restrictions on our social lives are to be lifted. 

“We are delighted that people will be able to enjoy this newfound freedom and we welcome people back to our town centres with open arms. 

“Together with our partners we will do everything we can to keep people safe, however we are asking people to take some personal responsibility, look after each other and not get into situations where your behaviour can escalate into violence.

“There is no place in our communities for violence and we will do all we can to bring offenders to justice. If you commit a violent offence you can expect to get a criminal record, which could affect your career and reputation. Don’t regret your night out.

“Over the last year we have all been tested and our communities have come together and supported each other. Dorset is a family county and we want everyone to enjoy their time here and for it not to be ruined by the minority who cannot handle their drink or think violence is acceptable.

“Know when you have had enough to drink, plan how you are going to get home and look after your friends and family.”

David Sidwick, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “We have already seen some incredibly busy weekends across Dorset and with people flocking to the county over the next few months to enjoy our beaches and other attractions, the level of demand facing our police and other services is going to increase.

“I want everyone to enjoy the summer, but to stay safe and to drink responsibly. I also want our communities, particularly those living in coastal towns, to know that the Force will remain vigilant, alcohol related violent crime will not be tolerated and any offenders will be dealt with.”


Download poster here: 
https://www.dorset.police.uk/media/67012/violent-crime_bottle.jpg

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Survey Seeks Views on Crime and Policing

Dorset’s Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick is launching a survey to ask residents for their views on crime and policing in the county.

Members of the public are being asked to complete the survey and provide information about what is important to them.

Go here to complete the survey online.

The survey is being launched as the Commissioner prepares his Police and Crime Plan, setting out a new strategic direction for Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner over the next three years.

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “This is your chance to tell me and Dorset Police what you want us to prioritise over the next few years.

“It will look at priorities derived from three years of campaigning and talking to the people of Dorset, which will form the basis for the plan, and now we need to check what you think about them – do you agree with them and do they align with your own values?”

Feedback from the survey will help shape the Police and Crime Plan, which will be in place by the autumn.

People completing the survey will be shown six different priority areas – from cutting crime and anti-social behaviour to making sure every penny counts – and asked to rate how important they think each one is.

The survey will also ask respondents whether they think the Commissioner’s overarching goal of making Dorset the safest county in England and Wales is a suitable ambition.

He said: “Remember, this plan is your plan. It sets the agenda for what the Force, as well as my own office, will focus on over the next three years.

“Therefore, it’s crucial that we get your thoughts and opinions to make sure local policing remains dynamic and responsive to the communities it serves.

“So please, take a moment to complete this survey. It takes just a couple of minutes to complete but the views we get will make a real difference.”



Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

July 16, 2021

Reminder As Legislation Bans The Possession of Dangerous Items In Private

Dorset Police is reminding the public of the dangers of carrying knives as new legislation comes into effect.

Changes to legislation brought about by the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 mean that from Wednesday 14 July 2021 all weapons banned in public by the Criminal Justice Act 1988, including zombie knives, shuriken or death stars and knuckledusters, will now also be banned in private, meaning people can no longer keep them at home.

Other sections of the act that have come into effect include an updated definition of flick knives to reflect changes in weapon designs, and the banning of private possession of flick knives and gravity knives.

The new legislation also affects specific firearms, such as rapid-fire rifles.

Anyone unlawfully possessing a firearm covered by the ban will face up to 10 years in prison and those possessing one of the other weapons can be sentenced to up to six months imprisonment or a fine, or both.

In 2020 the number of knife crimes reported to Dorset Police increased by 10.3 per cent from 272 in 2019 to 289. A quarter of victims were aged under 25.

The maximum penalty for an adult carrying a knife is four years in prison and an unlimited fine. You’ll get a prison sentence if you’re convicted of carrying a knife more than once.

Chief Superintendent Mark Callaghan, the Force’s strategic lead for violent crime, said: “The harm caused to families and communities through the tragic loss of life relating to knife crime is devastating and that is why knife crime remains a top priority for Dorset Police and we are committed to reducing knife crime offences in the county. These new measures will go some way to taking weapons off the streets and make it more difficult for people to get hold of knives and other dangerous items in the first place.

“Early intervention is key to making our communities safer and we work closely with our partner agencies to ensure that messages about the dangers and consequences of carrying a knife reaches children in schools and colleges.

“We want to provide support and advice to those who know a knife carrier and for parents, carers and bystanders to be able to spot the signs and speak out if they know someone is carrying a knife. We would encourage anyone with concerns to contact Dorset Police so we can take action and if appropriate put safeguarding measures in place to protect anyone who may be vulnerable.

“As part of the #KnivesRuinLives campaign we want to share the message that 'You matter, lives can change'.”

Councillor May Haines, BCP Council Portfolio Holder for Community Safety, said: “In light of the rising cases of knife crime across the BCP area, I welcome and support the legislation that is due to come into effect. I echo our police colleagues view that education and early intervention are key to helping keep our communities safe. Losing a loved one is heart-breaking but losing them to a violent crime makes it even harder to bear. Greater knowledge of how knife crime can negatively impact and take away lives, will prevent even more lives being lost and hopefully encourage people to change their behaviour when it comes to this issue that can have devastating consequences.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “Dorset has not experienced the same issues with knife crime which have been seen in some of our big cities, but I’m committed to reducing the number of incidents and ensuring these problems do not escalate here.

“These weapons have no place on our streets or in our schools and colleges and so I welcome this new legislation.

“We need to get the message out, particularly among young people, that there is no reason for anyone to carry a knife in Dorset and that there are serious consequences for those that do.”

If you believe someone is in immediate possession of a knife or offensive weapon please dial 999. If you would like to report your concerns about a knife carrier or need some advice, please email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or visit dorset.police.uk and report it online.

Unwanted knives can be disposed of at local recycling centres or safely packaged in your household waste.

Download poster here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/media/67010/offensive-weapons-act-public-poster.pdf


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 14, 2021

Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Yesterday officers attended Christchurch Railway Station following a report of 3 youths playing on the train track.
The British Transport Police are now dealing with this incident.
Please remind your children of the dangers of playing on a train track and keeping safe!
#5331 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice


Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

July 13, 2021

Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Today we attended an address to collect a GPS device that was found by a member of the public in Christchurch.
The device is worth about £400 but hadn't been reported missing or stolen.
We researched the addresses saved on the GPS and returned the device back all thanks to the honest member of public.
They were then given a reward by the owner.

We thought we would share the good news story as it brightened our day! #5331 #2729 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice


Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

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Sling Your Hook Campaign Launched By Neighbourhood Watch To Tackle Scams

We are excited to tell you more about our SLING YOUR HOOK campaign running throughout July to help tackle scams

WHY ‘SLING YOUR HOOK’?
The campaign taps into the psychology that scammers use to hook people in, helping you stay one step ahead and protect yourself and your loved ones against the increasing variety of scams happening every day. We’ve identified the following five behaviours scammers commonly use:

They imply they’re doing you a favour (reciprocity)
They indicate everyone else is doing this (social proof)
They say your only chance is to act now (urgency)
They act like they’re similar to you, so you like them and want to please them (connection)
They ask you to do one little thing which makes you do more (commitment).


We also know that often victims of scams report that in hindsight they felt something wasn’t quite right at the time. This campaign aims to raise awareness of the tactics scammers use and encourages people to ‘stop and think’ if something doesn’t FEEL, SEEM, LOOK or SOUND right. This allows them time to trust your gut instinct and help prevent becoming a scam victim.

“Everyone likes to feel special. But watch out! If a stranger is going out of their way for you, something fishy may be going on instead. Scammers like to offer one-off deals and favours. Don’t be afraid to tell them no.” John Hayward-Cripps, CEO of Neighbourhood Watch Network

How can you support this campaign?

LEARN: Visit our scams website pages to learn more about common scams, preventing scams, reporting scams, supporting victims and a scams campaign toolkit

SHARE: Follow us on our Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn channels and share our posts. (Links below.)

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: Join us for an online talk (details below)

ONLINE TALKS
We are delivering a series of scams awareness online talks in partnership with the Dedicated Card and Payment Crime Unit (DCPCU), the National Trading Standards Scams Team (NTSST) and Avast.

Anyone can attend, but we are now running waiting lists only for all the webinars apart from one! Last week we ran an online talk on ‘Exploring the psychology behind scams and how scammers are so effective at their crimes’. It was so popular we have decided to re-run it on 27th July, 5pm. Click here to book your place. Please note – this event will not be recorded.

Keep safe,

Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)

Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349


July 10, 2021

Officers Tackle Illegal and Unsafe Use of E-Scooters

Officers took to the streets of Bournemouth to talk to riders of privately owned e-scooters to let them know where they can use them legally and safely.

A total of 18 riders were spoken to and issued with first warnings during the day of action on Thursday 1 July 2021. They now risk being reported for traffic offences and seizure of their e-scooter if they are stopped riding it illegally again.

E-scooters, or electric scooters, are two wheeled scooters that are propelled by a motor and have recently experienced a surge in popularity. The only place to legally ride a privately owned e-scooter is on private land with the owner or occupier’s permission. This means it is illegal to ride an e-scooter on roads, pavements, cycle lanes, beach promenades, bridleways, or any publicly accessible land, such as parks and car parks.

Concerned about the safety of the rider, pedestrians and other road users, Sergeant Rhys Griffiths said: “E-scooters have become a real issue for some local residents and complaints about improper use have increased among our communities. We are also seeing more people riding them as a result of the Government trials taking place. However, it still remains illegal to ride a privately owned e-scooter on any public land including pavements, roads and promenades.

“Riders could be committing an offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 and, if used on the pavement, the Highway Act 1835. In short, unless you’ve hired the e-scooter through a Government approved trial scheme you are not allowed to ride it on public land.”

The Government has announced locations throughout the UK, including Bournemouth and Poole, where e-scooter rental scheme trials are taking place. This allows individuals to hire an e-scooter from an official scheme and ride legally. Privately owned e-scooters are not part of this trial.

Phillip Ellis, CEO of Beryl, said: “Beryl's e-scooter scheme in Bournemouth and Poole provides the community with a green, convenient and enjoyable way for people to travel, providing a clear alternative to car journeys.

‘’As part of the Government's e-scooter trials, they are classed as a type of motor vehicle and require a valid driving licence, insurance and for users to abide by the rules of the road.

‘’All users of our service need to abide by these laws and are reminded to through safety reminders within our app as well as our terms and conditions. In any instance where our vehicles are being misused, Beryl reserves the right to ban the relevant people from our scheme and, where appropriate, will refer the matter to the police.

“We will continue to work with the council, police and other stakeholders to support the safe and responsible use of our vehicles.’’

Councillor Mike Greene, BCP Council’s portfolio holder for transport and sustainability, said: “From the beginning, our e-scooter rental trial with Beryl has ensured that suitable safety measures are in place on the e-scooters. These include a limited top speed and GPS tracking, so that the e-scooters’ speeds are automatically reduced to 3mph in Slow Go zones, like the seafront promenade during the current summer restrictions. Private e-scooters are without these safeguards so we fully support the enforcement action being taken by the police against their illegal use in the area.”

Sergeant Rhys Griffiths continued: “We want to make sure everyone enjoys this summer safely. Renting from the approved scheme means the e-scooters are used legally and Beryl can take extensive steps to keep riders, pedestrians and other road users safe.”

Officers will continue to approach those riding an e-scooter on public land and inform them of the law. They will take down the details of the riders and explain where and how e-scooters can be used.

If you are using your e-scooter on public land, you should stop doing so immediately. Your e-scooter could be seized, and you could be liable for prosecution for traffic offences.

David Sidwick, Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, said: “The use of e-scooters has shot up over the last few months and I know from talking to members of the public that a lot of people are very concerned about them – particularly when they’re ridden along pavements and cycle lanes.

“I’m very pleased to see Dorset Police taking proactive steps to tell riders exactly where and how they are allowed to use their e-scooters. This advice is very clear and there should be no excuse for anyone riding one of these scooters illegally anywhere in our county.

“I’d also like to echo the warning given by officers that if anyone persists in using their e-scooter on public land, the device could be seized, and they could be prosecuted.”

What are the rules around privately owned e-scooters?

The only place you can ride a privately-owned e-scooter is on private land with the landowner’s permission.
It is against the law to ride an e-scooter on any public land. This includes roads, pavements, cycle lanes, beach promenades, bridleways, or any publicly accessible land such as parks and car parks.
An e-scooter is classed as a powered transporter and they are treated as a motor vehicle and fall under the Road Traffic Act 1988. They are subject to the same legal requirements as motor vehicles. This includes MOT, tax, licensing, insurance, and specific construction regulations.
If you are caught using an e-scooter on a public road, pavement, or other prohibited space you are committing a criminal offence and could be prosecuted.
Your e-scooter could be seized, you could end up with a fine, penalty points or even disqualification from driving.

The Government is running trials for renting e-scooters. To find out if these are taking place in an area near you go to their website: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/e-scooter-trials-guidance-for-users
You can find out more about e-scooters and powered transporters here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/powered-transporters/information-sheet-guidance-on-powered-transporters

Beryl as an operator of hired scooters provide insurance for their riders and third party liability cover. This insurance remains valid so long as riders are following the rules. For more information visit the website: https://beryl.cc/news/beryl-e-scooters-join-the-family


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 7, 2021

Multi-Agency Operation To Tackle Anti-Social Behaviour In The Water Off Poole Bournemouth and Christchurch

Multi-agency water-based patrols have taken place to target anti-social and irresponsible behaviour in Poole Harbour and along beaches in Bournemouth and Christchurch into Christchurch Harbour.

Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs) from Dorset Police teamed up with colleagues from BCP Council and Poole Harbour Commissioners on Saturday 3 July 2021 as part of the Force’s first Operation Seagoing.

The operation was launched in response to complaints and concerns from the public about anti-social behaviour involving people using personal watercrafts, including small speed boats, wet bikes and jet skis. Targeted patrols will be carried out in the two areas until September.

There is a 10-knot speed limit in Poole Harbour and anyone found breaking this could be fined up to £1,000 by Poole Harbour Commissioners.

In Poole Bay beach goers and people using personal watercrafts will see yellow buoys along the seafront of BCP beaches. These are placed 200m from the shoreline and set out where people can swim safely. People using personal watercrafts are able to enter that zone, but they must ride the watercraft at six knots or less in Bournemouth and Poole and eight in Christchurch, which is a walking pace.

Police Sergeant Sophie Williams, of Poole Neighbourhood Policing Team, said: “There are a lot of very responsible personal watercraft users that already work with authorities, supplying information and intelligence against those behaving dangerously. We want people to enjoy our fantastic harbour, beaches and water this summer and we are committed to working with our partners to make sure no one comes to harm.

“Anyone using a personal watercraft needs to ensure they respect all water users, behave responsibly and be mindful that people are swimming in the sea. Some people see the harbour simply as large open space, but it is the largest natural harbour in Europe, it is home to over 300 different species of birds and 7,000 yachts are permanently moored there. It needs to be treated as an extension of the town and we wouldn’t expect people to behave like this when travelling along a high street or precinct.

“Inappropriate or dangerous use of any type of watercraft or small boat will not be tolerated in our county. If people are found to be flouting the rules we, or our partner agencies, will take robust action against them and they could end up in court and with a heavy fine.”

Anyone using a watercraft or driving a motorised boat should follow a few simple steps:

See who else is in the water. The water is a shared space, but swimmers are hard to spot.
Look out for wildlife. Don’t harass or cause disturbance. We have some fabulous wildlife in the sea that can be harmed by noise, speed and aggressive behaviour.
Observe the sea conditions. They constantly change and can be unpredictable. The tide comes in and goes out two times a day at different times with the water moving in toward the beach or moving out away from the beach. Make sure you know what direction the water is moving in throughout the day. Check tide times, weather forecast and sea conditions before you leave home.
Watch your speed. From the shore to the yellow speed marker buoys the speed limit is six knots (assume 5mph) – they are there for a reason. Where possible, for your safety and others we would suggest you remain on the seaward of the buoys.

Sophie Ricketts, Head of Seasonal Response at BCP Council, said: “BCP Council is working with Dorset Police, the RNLI and harbourmaster colleagues to address water based anti-social behaviour and remind water users of the relevant byelaws. We encourage all personal watercraft users to act responsibly and ensure they are mindful of swimmers and other water users.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “I am aware of the problems these small watercrafts can cause if they are used irresponsibly, and I know this can have an impact on boat users as well as people living close to our harbours and beaches.

“People need to be aware that using small watercrafts in an irresponsible way doesn’t just cause a nuisance to others – it can be incredibly dangerous.

“Poole Harbour is one of our county’s greatest natural resources and I’m very glad to see the Force working so closely with partner agencies on this operation, ensuring it can be enjoyed by everyone throughout the summer.”

Poole Harbour Commissioners (PHC) Harbour Master, Captain Brian Murphy said: “Every year the majority of byelaw offences in Poole Harbour are due to the reckless behaviour of a minority of personal watercraft users.

“PHC has had mitigation in place since personal watercrafts were first introduced to the market. This includes a designated area, byelaw enforcement, permit to operate with associated terms and conditions, CCTV, patrols including joint patrols with Dorset Police and SIFCA and signage. We have seen a significant increase in the number of permit holders over the past two years, increasing by 50 per cent each year, which seems to be aligned with the easement of COVID-19 lockdowns.

“This large increase in numbers has resulted in a similar increase in the number of byelaw infringement reports received from patrol officers and other harbour users, which has led to additional mitigation. This includes an additional patrol officer, voluntary task force, slipway facility and manning, additional CCTV, updated signage, updated code of conduct, body cameras and an increase in joint patrols, including multi-agency work.

“PHC very much welcomes the additional resources from other agencies to supplement existing measures.

“Every year there are a number of warning letters issued to personal watercraft users and unfortunately a number find themselves in the magistrates’ court facing significant fines and costs. It is very important that personal watercraft users fully understand the requirements before deciding to visit Poole Harbour and therefore all personal watercraft users are encouraged to visit the PHC website www.phc.co.uk or contact the harbour office on 01202 440210.”


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 2, 2021

Your Voice Matters Survey

Dear Resident,

It is now the time of year for the Neighbourhood Policing Team Priority Surveys to begin running, to help feed into the new priorities we will launch after the summer.

Our Priorities are set every 6 months, with a review and update every quarter.
You can view the current priorities on our webpages:
Click Here

You may have already taken part in our survey at the start of the year. This helped us set the priorities we are currently working towards at the moment.

If you want to feed into the new priorities, to be launched after the summer, you can do so by following the link: Click Here


Thank you

Message Sent By:
Dom Smith (Dorset Police, NEO 5390, Bournemouth & Christchurch NEO)

-----------------------------------------------
Do You Know What A Ghost Broker is?

Just 15% of people have heard of a ‘ghost broker’.* Do you know what one is?
Have you ever heard of a ‘ghost broker’? No, we are not talking about things that go bump in the night – this is a lot scarier. ‘Ghost brokers’ are fraudsters who sell fake or invalid car insurance policies. Victims are sold fake insurance documents for a policy that does not exist, or for a genuine policy that has been set up using false details to lower the price of the premium.

How do ‘ghost brokers’ operate?
Fraudsters lure victims in with the offer of cheaper insurance premiums, usually via social media or by word-of-mouth. These individuals or groups pose as middlemen for well-known insurance companies, claiming they can offer you legitimate car insurance at a significantly cheaper price.

This type of fraud is typically carried out either by forging insurance documents, falsifying your details to bring the price down, or by taking out a genuine policy for you but cancelling it soon after.

Often, the victim is not aware that they have been scammed until they are involved in an accident and try to claim on the policy.

Who do ‘ghost brokers’ target?
‘Ghost brokers’ tend to target vulnerable communities, including members of non-English speaking communities who may not have full knowledge of UK insurance and laws, as well as young people looking for cheaper insurance deals.

Last year, Action Fraud received 694 reports of ‘ghost broking’, with almost a third (29%) coming from victims aged 17-29. The reported losses for these victims alone totalled £113,500, with each individual losing an average of £559.

Figures also indicate that over half (58%) of all reports in 2020 were submitted by men.

What could happen if I drive without valid insurance?
As policies sold by ‘ghost brokers’ are either invalid, non-existent or fraudulent, this means that the driver is technically uninsured, meaning that you could face:

£300 fixed penalty notice
Six points on driving licence
Vehicle being seized and crushed

How can I protect myself from ‘ghost brokers’?
There are simple steps that you can take to spot the signs of these scams and avoid being taking for a ride by ‘ghost brokers’:

‘Ghost brokers’ often advertise and communicate via social media, online forums and messaging apps. If a broker is only using a mobile phone or email as a way of contact, this can be a sign of this type of crime. Fraudsters do not want to be traced after they have taken money from their victims.
They may also try to sell insurance policies through print adverts in pubs, clubs or bars, newsagents
If a deal seems too good to be true, then it probably is. If you are not sure about the broker, check on the Financial Conduct Authority or the British Insurance Brokers’ Association website for a list of all authorised insurance brokers. You can also contact the insurance company directly to verify the broker’s details. You can also check to see if a car appears to be insured on the Motor Insurance Database website.
If you think that you have been a victim of a ghost broker, you can report your concerns to Action Fraud at actionfraud.police.uk or on 0300 123 2040.
You can also contact the Insurance Fraud Bureau via its confidential Cheatline on 0800 422 0421 or on the IFB website.

*According to a YouGov survey commissioned by the IFB

Message Sent By:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

June 29, 2021

Please Stick With The Restrictions To Help Halt The Spread of Covid-19

Dorset Police is reminding residents and visitors not to become complacent and to continue to stick with the current COVID-19 restrictions to help halt the spread of the virus.

The number of positive COVID-19 cases is increasing across England, mainly involving the Delta variant, and cases in Dorset are highest the younger age groups, particularly among the 15 to 24 year olds.

There are still some limited restrictions in place. People should only meet others inside in groups of up to six people or with members of two households. This rule is also in force in pubs and restaurants. Local authority licensing teams will be visiting venues to ensure compliance continues.

People can also meet others outside, such as private gardens or public spaces, but this is capped at 30 people.

Assistant Chief Constable Sam de Reya, of Dorset Police, said: “I understand some people are frustrated that we did not enter Step 4 of the Government’s roadmap as predicted on Monday 21 June. However, we are seeing a steep rise in cases in Dorset and elsewhere in the country and it is imperative we all do our bit to limit the spread of the virus.

“We are asking all members of our community, including young people and visitors, to continue to follow the rules on meeting others indoors and outside. Whether it be catching up with friends and family or watching the Euros tournament over the coming weeks please remember to wash hands regularly, give each other space and throw open windows and doors to provide fresh air.

“If we all stick with these rules and advice together, we stand a far better chance of reaching the next step of the roadmap and seeing greater freedom.”


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

-------------------------------
Free Webinars About Scams In July

Following on from our Alert last week relating to yet another online scam to look out for, I am delighted to be writing to you to invite you to join us in July for a month of weekly online webinars to expose the truths behind scams.

The webinars are FREE to attend and are open to anyone who would like to know more about scams, the psychology behind scams, prevention and how a fraud case is investigated.

The webinars bring together experts in their field relating to online fraud, a topic which we are all too familiar with and can affect anyone and everyone, as our lives are played out more digitally.

The dates of the webinars and their topics are as follows:

6th July, 5pm
Exploring the psychology behind scams and how scammers are so effective at their crimes
Paul Maskell, Fraud & Cyber Crime Prevention Manager, Dedicated Card and Payment Crime Unit (DCPCU)

14th July, 5pm
Insights into how a fraud case is investigated and how not to be the next victim
Ben Hobbs, Detective Sergeant; and Catriona Still, Head of Fraud Prevention & Training, Dedicated Card and Payment Crime Unit (DCPCU)

23rd July 5pm
Scams awareness training from the Friends Against Scams initiative
The National Trading Standards Scams Team (NTSST)

30th July, 5pm
Don't get hooked by scammers! What you need to know about flubot and phishing scams
Christopher Budd, Senior Global Threat Communications Manager, Avast

How to book your place
You can click on the links within this message on each of the webinars topics to register your place or you can go to www.ourwatch.org.uk/webinars and click on the webinar that you wish to attend, you can attend all of them if you wish and so make sure that you complete the registration page for each of them.

We look forward to seeing you all there.

Message Sent By:
Cheryl Spruce (NWN, Head of Membership and Community Engagement , National)

Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349


June 27, 2021

Force Improves Domestic Abuse Services To Support Vulnerable People Across The County

Dorset Police has introduced a number of improvements to transform the way it responds to and supports victims of domestic abuse.

The COVID-19 pandemic saw reports of domestic abuse rise nationally. In Dorset a 25 per cent increase in domestic abuse incidents was recorded compared to the previous year – there were 9,124 incidents in 2020/2021 compared to 7,289 in 2019/2020.

In response Dorset Police initiated an opportunity to prioritise improvements to how it responds to domestic abuse and introduced three new programmes to deliver better outcomes for all those affected by such abuse.

Chief Inspector Julie Howe, Force Vulnerability Programme Lead at Dorset Police, said: “Dorset Police is committed to providing an outstanding service to victims of domestic abuse across the county.

“Over the last 18 months we have taken time to understand the impact that this abuse has on the lives of victims and their families and made sure that our services put the voice of the victim at the very heart of everything we do.”

SafeLives, a UK-wide charity dedicated to ending domestic abuse, has worked closely with Dorset Police to help it understand its strengths and areas for improvement. As a result, the Force has adopted the Domestic Abuse Matters training programme, which is currently being delivered to 750 officers and frontline staff.

It covers a range of topics, including coercive control, victim blaming, and manipulation techniques used by domestic abuse offenders, and equips first responders with the tools they need to better support victims.

In addition, the DRIVE perpetrator programme was launched in March 2021 as a partnership between Dorset Police, the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner, Dorset Council, BCP Council and Public Health Dorset, with the first six months funded by the Home Office. DRIVE works with high-risk, high-harm and serial offenders to challenge and support changes in their attitudes, beliefs and behaviours, and appropriately address any areas of vulnerability.

A multi-agency panel brings together representatives from relevant agencies, including policing, adult and child social services, housing and health, to provide a rounded view of cases and refer appropriate cases to the programme.

DRIVE, which is delivered by Hampton Trust, aims to change the narrative around domestic abuse and stop asking victims why they didn’t leave and start asking perpetrators why they didn’t stop.

Tracey Kent, Deputy Chief Executive at Hampton Trust, said: “Drawing on our extensive experience of engaging perpetrators, we are delighted to be working in partnership with Dorset Police, SafeLives, and multiple frontline and localised agencies to deliver our second DRIVE pilot, having delivered the first pilot in West Sussex.

“To truly tackle the root cause of domestic abuse, we have a responsibility to hold those responsible for abuse accountable to break the cycle of harmful behaviour and safeguard our future generations.”

Dorset Police also introduced Operation Encompass in early 2021, which is a way of sharing information between the Force and schools across the county where there have been instances of domestic abuse involving a child. It allows the police to pass on relevant information to the school that the child attends so that the right support can be put in place.

Children exposed to domestic abuse are among the most vulnerable in our society and are often harmed physically, emotionally and psychologically through domestic abuse. Dorset Police is following this national model for information sharing to improve safeguarding and mitigate the harm that this can have on the lives of children.

Chief Inspector Julie Howe continued: “We know that domestic abuse devastates lives, and this is by no means the end of our journey. Dorset Police has a culture of continuous improvement and we are always striving to do better.

“We will continue to work to deliver the outstanding service that our communities expect and deserve.”

David Sidwick, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “I’ve pledged that victims will be at the heart of the new Police and Crime Plan for Dorset which I am currently developing, and that includes victims of domestic abuse, a toxic and destructive crime which sadly all too often remains hidden.

“I’m glad to see the introduction of schemes such as the DRIVE programme in Dorset but I know that far more can and should be done to help these victims.

“I will be working closely with the Force and other agencies over the coming months and years to see what other innovations can be introduced, and to make sure those who experience domestic abuse receive the best support possible.”

Anyone who is affected by domestic abuse can get support from Dorset Police by calling 101 or using our online reporting tools: www.dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/

In an emergency, always call 999.

You can find information about other places to get support on the Dorset Police website: www.dorset.police.uk/da

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

June 25, 2021

Covid Vaccine Passport Scam

We have been made aware of a Covid Vaccine Passport scam email going around that purports to be from the NHS and informs recipients that they can apply for their “Digital Coronavirus Passports”

Clicking on the link within the email, takes you to a convincing but fake NHS website that asks for personal and payment details. (for an admin fee)

The website has since been taken down, but in case similar emails/websites appear can you please circulate the attached alert to your residents, members, groups and mailing lists.

And just to reiterate, your vaccination status is obtained FREE through the NHS App, website or by calling the NHS on 119.

More information can be found on the gov.uk website;
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/demonstrating-your-covid-19-vaccination-status-when-travelling-abroad

Please note that any Phishing scams can be reported to SERS (Suspicious Email Reporting Service): report@phishing.gov.uk

Best wishes

NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH NETWORK, Central Support Team
Neighbourhoood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349


Attachments
Scam Alert.pdf


Message Sent By:
Cheryl Spruce (NWN, Head of Membership and Community Engagement , National)

June 18, 2021

Image Appeal Following Dog Bite Incident In Christchurch

Officers investigating an incident where a woman was bitten by a dog in Christchurch are issuing images of two people they would like to speak to.

The incident occurred at around 1.45pm on Saturday 5 June 2021 on the beach between Steamer Point and Highcliffe Castle while the victim was walking her dog with her family.

It is reported that a large dog ran toward the victim’s dog’s neck. The victim – a woman aged in her 40s from the New Forest area – got caught up in the incident and the large dog bit her.

The offending dog is described as an Akita crossed with a Doberman that had dark brown or black short fur. It was not on a lead at the time of the incident.

The victim sustained a bite to her hand and scratches and she attended hospital for treatment.

Police Constable Jennie Sykes-Martin, of Dorset Police, said: “The owners of the dog walked away and did not provide their details, so I am carrying out enquiries to locate them.

“I am now in a position to issue an image of a man and a woman who I would like to speak to as part of my enquiries and I would urge anyone who recognises them to please get in touch.”

View images here : https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/12629

Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210089530. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

--------------------------------------------
Force Launches Seat Belt Safety Campaign

Dorset Police is reminding drivers and passengers to belt up this month as officers continue to tackle seat belt offences throughout June as part of a national seat belt safety campaign.

Wearing a seat belt is a legal requirement and drivers or adult passengers caught not wearing a belt face a £100 fixed penalty notice or up to a £500 fine in court.

All children must use the appropriate child restraint correct for their age when travelling in a vehicle until they reach 135cm tall or their 12th birthday. After this point all children must wear a seat belt. All children’s car seats must be EU approved and are marked with an ‘E’ label. They must be suitable for the child’s weight and size and correctly fitted according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Drivers can be fined up to £500 if a child aged under 14 isn’t in the correct car seat or wearing a seat belt while they are driving.

Inspector Craig Tatton, of the Roads Policing Team, said “We will be out over the coming weeks in local communities and on main routes tackling seat belt offences, in addition to the other high-risk road traffic offences. It is scientifically proven that if you are involved in a collision and you are not wearing a seat belt, you are more likely to suffer a serious or even fatal injury. The law exists to ensure people’s safety. If you are seriously injured it effects not only you, but also your family and friends who will all have to live with the decision that you made not to use this simple safety measure.

“I have had to tell a grieving family that their loved one died because they weren’t wearing a seat belt. It is heartbreaking and needless. Please don’t let it be you.”

For further advice, please visit www.gov.uk/seat-belts-law or www.dorsetroadsafe.org.uk/.

We are inviting parents and guardians to attend our online webinar sessions on seat belt safety that will be taking place in July. It will be an open forum and your chance to chat with representatives from the Dorset Road Safe Education Partnership who will tell you who they are, what services they offer, and will answer any other questions you may have.

Please register through this link: https://attendee.gototraining.com/rt/5815304220670996225
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the training.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

--------------------------------------------
David Sidwick Blog on Catalytic Converter Theft

I can only imagine the frustration of returning to your car only to find it has been taken apart.

This is something that happened to a friend of mine recently and has sadly been happening to more and more people across Dorset.

The theft of catalytic converters has become a huge problem around the UK, and sadly it isn’t one that our county has been spared from.

Thieves want to take the devices because they contain precious metals such as platinum, palladium and rhodium, which have rocketed in value and are now worth more than gold.

It’s driven by market forces and make no mistake – those behind it are serious organised criminals. Videos circulating on social media show thieves, equipped with a car jack and cordless power tools, able to get under a car and remove the catalytic converter in less than a minute.

Car insurer Admiral reported that last year there was a 44% increase across the country in claims for stolen catalytic converters, with the average claim being as much as £1,500.
It’s not just an inconvenience. Your car cannot be legally driven without a catalytic converter, and if you depend upon it for work, to get your children to school or to get to people you care for, it will have a major impact on your life.

Cases doubling locally

Here in Dorset, there has been an increase in reports over the last few months, with cases in May doubling compared with the number seen in March.

Many of the cases have been in Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch, but this is by no means a problem that’s confined to the conurbation and there have been small hotspots in the west and the north of the county.

One of my priorities, which will feature prominently in my new Police and Crime Plan, is to deal with organised crime and catalytic converter theft is something I aim to tackle, working closely with Dorset Police and other partners.

The Force has a robust strategy in place to deal with the problem, which starts with issuing advice to motorists to reduce the chances of them becoming victims.

Make your car safer

The advice includes parking your car in a locked garage where possible, but if that isn’t an option, parking in well lit areas. Try to park close to fences, walls or a kerb, as that will make the theft more difficult, and try to avoid parking with one half on the pavement and the other on the road as that gives the thieves an advantage.

Consider installing a driveway alarm and sensor, and park in view of CCTV and video doorbells if you’ve got them. Look out for the Secured By Design (SBD) mark to make sure the security device you’re buying has been accredited on behalf of the police to meet the highest standards.

You can also property mark your catalytic converter with a unique code, so it can be traced back to you if recovered, as well as buying a ‘cage clamp’ or catalytic converter guard that makes it more difficult to remove. Speak to your local dealership to find the best type of guard for your vehicle.

As I said earlier, this is a national problem and so Dorset Police is also working closely with other forces and crime fighting agencies around the country to build up more knowledge about this crime and how best to tackle it.

We also need to make it harder for criminals to sell their stolen materials, so the Force is working with other agencies such as HMRC, the Environment Agency and BCP and Dorset Council environmental services departments to target illegal activity and raise awareness of the property marking scheme. This includes joint visits to scrap metal dealers across the county.

There is work taking place with the motor trade across Dorset, helping car dealerships and garages provide the best advice about how to make their vehicles secure. This includes property marking for identified vulnerable vehicles across the Force. The registered keeper will receive a letter advising them to go to a specified garage to receive this service.

Police need your help

But the police need your help to combat this problem, so please – if you see anything suspicious make sure you report it by calling 999 immediately.

Try to provide the best information:

How many people are involved?
Give a description – height, build, clothing etc.
What vehicle are they travelling in? Try to get the registration number if you can, or other features such as dents, marks or stickers.
What direction did they leave the area in?


This is a serious crime being carried out by serious criminals, but together we can stamp it out.

David Sidwick
Dorset Police and Crime CommissionerEmail tracking gif


Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)


June 15, 2021

Has The Pandemic Made Us More Or Less Aware of Online Risks?

Along with our Cyberhood Watch partner, Avast, we have launched a new survey to understand whether the Covid-19 pandemic has changed our attitudes towards certain aspects of cybersecurity and privacy since the first lockdown in March 2020.

The findings from the survey will be used to inform ongoing Cyberhood Watch awareness initiatives for the Neighbourhood Watch community and draw attention to important cybersecurity and privacy topics though the media to help UK citizens improve their knowledge of, and protection from, cyberthreats.

The survey of 16 questions will take you less than 5 minutes to complete and all answers are anonymous. It is open from today and will close on Sunday 27th June 2021. If you’d like to take part, please follow the link below:

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/XSYQQTD

Thank you very much in advance for your support in the fight against cybercrime in the UK.


Follow us: ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn
Neighbourhoood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349


Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)

June 12, 2021

David Sidwick - My First Month In Office

One month ago, I was elected as the Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset.

After three years of campaigning for the role, I already had a very good idea of what I wanted to achieve for the people and businesses of the county.

Now, the work of putting that into place has begun in earnest as I develop my plans to make Dorset the safest county in the UK.

I’ve spoken before about my priorities for the county. These are to robustly focus on cutting crime, to bring back community focused policing to the streets of Dorset, to fight organised crime such as county lines drug gangs, to deal with issues affecting our rural communities and to put victims and communities at the heart of everything we do.

My plan for Dorset

I remain focused on these issues, and a good deal of my work over the last four weeks has revolved around forming a plan which outlines exactly how we’ll be able to achieve this. The priorities of my campaign will be the priorities of the plan.

That has involved one group of people I’ll be working with more closely than anyone – my own team in the Office of The Police and Crime Commissioner (OPCC).

You’ll be finding out about the new Police and Crime Plan for Dorset very soon, and over the summer you’ll be getting a chance to have your say on the ideas being put forward.

This plan is not only something that PCCs legally must produce, it’s a roadmap outlining exactly how I’m going to make the county a better place.

Issues close to my heart

But as you know, the real world doesn’t wait for us to sit and draw up strategies, and so you will see announcements from me and the Force before the plan is in place.

That’s why I’m delighted the Force has already been able to launch some new initiatives which will have a real impact on two issues that are close to my heart, and which I know cause a lot of concern to Dorset residents.

The first involved e-scooters, the use of which has shot up in recent months. Officers have been out and about across Bournemouth talking to riders of private e-scooters, letting them know exactly where they can use these devices legally – and more importantly where they can’t – and warning them they risk having the items seized.

The second is a campaign to issue crime prevention advice to dog owners. Although there have mercifully been very few cases of dog theft in Dorset, news about an increase across the country is something pet owners worry about a lot.

Of course, the police don’t work in isolation, and I’ve also spent my first month meeting senior local authority figures including Cllr Spencer Flower and Matt Prosser, leader and chief executive of Dorset Council, and Cllr Drew Mellor and Graham Farrant, leader and chief executive of BCP Council.

BCP’s Multi-Agency Command Centre, which brings officers from the police, council, and other agencies together to respond to issues in real time, will be invaluable when large numbers of visitors arrive on Bournemouth’s beaches this summer. It’s an excellent example of organisations working together in partnership and is something I want to see far more of.

Dedicated people

It’s been a huge honour to start getting to know some of the dedicated people across the Force and in the OPCC who I’ll be working with over the next few years to make my clear vision a reality. It’s also been really useful as I’ve been finding out more about Dorset Police, speaking to individuals I had met previously along with others working in areas of policing new to me.

As well as getting to know senior officers, some of whom I’d met on the campaign trail, and finding out about the high-level strategies, it’s also been a great privilege to meet many officers working on the ground.

These include Sue Hillier and Elizabeth Porcher from the dog section. It’s been fascinating to learn more about their work, what they’ve got planned and what I might be able to do to support them.

It was also a pleasure to meet Anna Harvey, Chair of the Dorset Police Federation branch, which represents officers, and Debbi Potter, the branch secretary of Unison, which represents the Force’s many civilian staff.

Incredible volunteers

And it was a great honour to be able to address the first online awards event for Special Constables and Police Support Volunteers.

The Force has more than 140 Special Constables and 160 volunteers. They all do tremendous work and it was wonderful, during Volunteers’ Week, to have been able to pay tribute to their efforts.

Last week was Volunteers’ Week and therefore it is absolutely appropriate that I should also mention other volunteers that make a difference across Dorset such as Neighbourhood Watch and Community Speedwatch – they do an amazing public service and we know that these initiatives work.

It’s been an incredibly busy month with far too much going on to list here, but I hope this has given you a flavour of what I’ve been up to.

Rest assured – you’ll be hearing a lot more from me very soon as we bring the plan to reality, driving us towards making Dorset the safest county in the UK.

David Sidwick
Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner


Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

June 7, 2021

Image Appeal Following Burglary In Christchurch

Officers are issuing images of stolen items of jewellery as part of their investigation into a burglary in Christchurch.

During the evening of Thursday 15 April 2021 the victim noticed that items of jewellery were missing from her address in the Smugglers Lane area.

It is believed the incident occurred some time between Thursday 11 February and Thursday 15 April 2021.

Police Constable Charlotte Fowler, of Christchurch police, said: “Our enquiries are continuing into this incident and I am now in a position to release images of some of the stolen items.

View images here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/12546

“I am appealing to anyone who has seen the items of jewellery pictured for sale locally in unusual circumstances to please get in touch.

“The jewellery is of great sentimental value to the victim and I am therefore doing all I can to locate it and identify who was responsible.”

Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210059386. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Over 5M Suspicious Emails Reported

Phishing remains the most successful attack vector for cyber criminals targeting individuals and businesses.


Cyber criminals love phishing. Unfortunately, this is not a harmless riverbank pursuit. When criminals go phishing, you are the fish and the bait is usually contained in a scam email or text message. The criminal’s goal is to convince you to click on the links within their scam email or text message, or to give away sensitive information (such as bank details). These messages may look like the real thing but are malicious. Once clicked, you may be sent to a dodgy website which could download viruses onto your computer, or steal your passwords.

As of 30 April 2021, over 5.8 million emails were reported to the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS). The tool, which was launched by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and the City of London Police last April, allows the public to forward suspicious emails to an automated system that scans it for malicious links. Since its launch, over 43,000 scams and 84,000 malicious websites have been removed.


What are the most common phishing scams?

The most commonly spoofed organisation reported in phishing emails was TV Licensing, with victims of these emails reporting losses totalling £5.3m. The majority of losses occurred as a result of victims following malicious links in the emails and inputting their personal information into what they thought was the legitimate TV Licensing website. Shortly after, they would receive a call from criminals impersonating bank staff who was able to convince them that their bank accounts were compromised and persuaded them to transfer all of their money to a new ‘safe’ account. Some of the other most commonly impersonated organisations included HMRC and DVLA. We also received more than 40,000 suspicious email reports relating to COVID-19.


How you can protect yourself from phishing messages.

Fake emails and text messages can sometimes be difficult to spot and criminals are constantly getting better at finding ways to make them seem more authentic. Email address spoofing, for example, is just one of the tactics criminals will use to try and make their fake emails look real. Here are some tips you should follow to protect yourself, and others, from scam emails and text messages:

1: Be cautious of messages asking for your personal information. Official organisations, such as your bank, should never ask you for personal or financial information via email or text message. If you receive a message and you want to check that it’s legitimate, you can call the organisation directly using a known number, such as the one on a bank statement or utility bill.

2: Report suspicious emails. If you receive an email you’re not quite sure about, you should report it to the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS) by forwarding the email to: report@phishing.gov.uk. Your reports will help government and law enforcement agencies to remove malicious emails and websites.

3: Report suspicious text messages. If you receive a suspicious text message, you can report it by forwarding the message to 7726. It’s free of charge and enables your mobile network provider to investigate the origin of the text and take action, if found to be malicious.

4: Report fraud. If you’ve lost money or provided personal information as a result of a phishing scam, notify your bank immediately and report it to Action Fraud.


For more information on how to protect yourself from fraud and cyber crime, please visit: actionfraud.police.uk/cybercrime


Thanks for reading! If you found this information useful, please help us spread the word by forwarding this email to your friends.


Message Sent By:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

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Force Issues Road Safety Message

Dorset Police is reminding motorists to be mindful of all road users this summer in an effort to reduce the number of people seriously injured or killed on the county’s roads.

The May bank holiday weekend saw residents and visitors make the most of the beautiful weather in our stunning county.

Sadly, two motorcyclists lost their lives following collisions in Bournemouth and near Dorchester over the weekend. Investigations are underway to establish the circumstances surrounding each collision.

Dorset Police and partner agencies are working together to remind all road users of the importance of taking that extra bit of time to look for vulnerable road users like motorcyclists, especially at junctions.

A campaign was launched in April 2021, which identified key known locations where motorcyclists have been injured in road traffic collisions. Unique road signs were placed in these areas to remind all road users to take that extra time and THINK BIKE!

Inspector Craig Tatton, from the traffic unit, said: “Motorcyclists and cyclists don’t have a roll cage, seat belts or airbags, so when they are involved in a collision they are sadly often seriously injured or killed.

“Everyone can play a part in reducing the risk and the number of incidents on the roads. Queues and delays can be stressful and frustrating, which can cause road users to take risks and make mistakes.

“We want everyone to respect each other whilst using our roads and urge all road users to do the same by taking that extra time to look for vulnerable road users and make sure they have been seen.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “The next few weeks are likely to remain extremely busy on our roads as residents and tourists alike take advantage of the good weather.

“I’d like to ask everyone who will be out and about to please take care, slow down and look out for other road users.”

Christine Sharma, road safety manager at Dorset & Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service, said: “Biker Down, which is a National Fire Chiefs Council initiative, is delivered in Dorset by our partners at Doc Bike. By exploring scene management, first aid and the science of being seen, this intervention encourages all road users to be accountable for the safety of motorcyclists. Whether or not you’re a biker, please consider booking onto a Biker Down course by contacting them at bikerdown@docbike.org.”

A guide has been produced to provide advice to all road users about how they can be safe on the roads. It can be found on the Dorset Road Safe website - dorsetroadsafe.org.uk


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Force Works With Council Colleagues To Tackle Unlawful Encampments In West Dorset

Dorset Police worked alongside Dorset Council to tackle unauthorised encampments in West Dorset over the bank holiday weekend.

At around 6.30pm on Friday 28 May 2021 officers were called to reports of a group of travellers at Weymouth Rugby Club. They attended and spoke to the group, before monitoring the incident overnight. Separate unauthorised encampments were also reported at Swannery car park and the Nothe.

On Saturday 29 May 2021 Dorset Police reattended the rugby club, while the local authority made the alternative site at Piddlehinton available.

While officers were at the site, the group left and relocated to the Marsh Swimming Pool area at around midday.

Following a process of engagement, a notice under section 62 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act was served on the group to leave the site by 10.30am on Sunday 30 May 2021 to the approved alternative site in Piddlehinton. The group departed out of the Dorset local authority area by the stated time.

Dorset County Local Police Area (LPA) Commander Chief Superintendent Steve Lyne, of Dorset Police, said: “Having listened to the various groups involved and considering the various parties rights, officers worked alongside colleagues at Dorset Council to move on these groups from key community locations using the available and relevant powers. The decision was also made to allow two smaller encampments to remain as there was no impact on the local community and they had worked with the local authority on the site, including buying parking tickets.

“We have robust plans in place to deal with unauthorised encampments throughout the summer months and we continue to ask residents and visitors to respect each other and help protect the county’s environment.”

Dorset Police received a report at around 7.50am on Tuesday 1 June 2021 of an unauthorised traveller encampment at the Bridport Leisure Centre. Following discussion with the local authority and the leisure centre, officers gave the group a section 62 direction to vacate the site.

Chief Superintendent Steve Lyne continued: “Officers carried out regular patrols in the area and liaised with those present, as well as the local community. The group left the site at around 9pm on Tuesday 1 June in line with the section 62 direction.”

Councillor Ray Bryan, Dorset Council portfolio holder for highways, travel and environment, said: “Our Gypsy and Traveller Liaison Service is working with Dorset Police, liaising with travellers and landowners to provide advice and support to landowners and the settled community. We also act as a first point of contact for travellers for health, welfare, housing and education issues.

“Our transit site at Piddlehinton can provide a solution to unauthorised encampments and enable the police to use particular powers. We ask everyone to be respectful and look after our county.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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David Sidwick Blog on Dog Theft

As the proud owner of a cockapoo pup, I understand perfectly why people are so concerned about dog theft.

When you take a dog into your home, it becomes a member of the family. To a young child a dog is a treasured friend, and to an older person experiencing loneliness and isolation, it can be a lifeline of support.

The lockdowns we’ve gone through over the last year have seen people across the country become increasingly desperate for the companionship that a dog provides. This has pushed up demand and sadly therefore made these beloved animals a target for callous criminals who care about nothing but profit.

Some have turned to breeding puppies without a licence, which they brazenly sell for thousands of pounds on well-known websites. Others have been snatching them from the streets to breed or sell them.

I know from my own post bag that pet theft is something the people of Dorset care a lot about. Stories about dogs being stolen have been reported in national newspapers and circulated on social media, leading to widespread concern.

Cases are low in Dorset

I’d like to reassure members of the public that the number of pet thefts in Dorset is really quite low. The Force recorded 26 cases in the whole of 2020, and only four between 1 January and 31 March this year – however even four is too many and would have been greatly distressing for those dog owners.

Nationally, cases rose by 170% last year and the fear of a dog being stolen is very real.
I have made my feelings clear on this matter and will continue to campaign both regionally and nationally for stiffer sentencing for this crime. Locally we are already working on an action plan to deal with this problem, but an important part of the solution is improving people’s awareness about how to reduce our pets’ vulnerability.

So, I’m very glad to see the Force has launched a campaign to issue crime prevention advice to dog owners.

The campaign urges dog owners to have three important things at the front of their minds.

1. Firstly, never leave your dog unattended. No matter how tempting it is, when you go into the shop don’t leave the dog tied up outside.

2. Make certain that wherever your dog lives, it’s secure so nobody is able to just lean over the fence and pinch it. Take a close look at your home and garden boundaries. Make sure gates and entrances are locked, kennels aren’t visible from the street, and if possible make your fence harder to climb by adding a trellis.

3. And make sure that whenever your dog’s out in public, it’s got a collar and lead on, including a tag. Whatever you do, don’t put your dog’s name on the tag – just your name and a contact number.

There are other things you can do and the Force has got more information here. Having your dog neutered will mean it’s less likely to be stolen for breeding. Microchipping is not only a legal requirement, it means your dog will be much easier to track down if it is stolen. And if you can, varying where you walk your dog – and what time of the day you do it – can also help.

More work to do

This is important advice which will help dog lovers prevent their beloved animals being stolen, but there is more work we can do.

This week, I had the pleasure of meeting Sue Hillier and Elizabeth Porcher from the dog section, who came along to my office with Loxley – a beautiful springer spaniel pup who is about to be trained to become a police sniffer dog.

They told me about the important work they’re doing, as well as about some of the exciting plans they’ve got in the pipeline.

They gave me some great examples of working more closely with other organisations, such as the councils who are responsible for licensing puppy breeders – and prosecuting unlicensed ones – as well as the RSPCA who deal with animal cruelty matters.

Over the next few weeks I’ll be talking to Dorset Police further about what they’re doing to ensure our pets are safe, and what other actions they can take to prevent dog thefts.
I look forward to updating you shortly about the outcome of these conversations.

But, in the meantime, please do everything you can to keep your pets safe.

David Sidwick
Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)


June 4, 2021

Crime Prevention Advice Issued To Dog Owners

Dorset Police is issuing some crime prevention advice to dog owners to prevent future dog theft incidents in the county.

There have been a number of dog theft stories circulating on social media and in the media over the last year, which has led to growing concern among owners both locally and nationally. While nationally dog theft cases increased by 170 per cent in 2020, reported dog theft offences in Dorset fell between 2017 and 2019 from 35 to 22 and rose slightly to 26 cases in 2020. Between 1 January 2021 and 31 March 2021, there have been four confirmed dog thefts in the county.

Chief Superintendent Mark Callaghan, of Dorset Police, said: “We fully understand the emotional impact that this kind of crime has on dog owners and the wider community and we take such reports very seriously and investigate any legitimate lines of enquiry. Thankfully over the last couple of years we have been able to locate some stolen dogs as a result of our investigations and reunite them with their owners.

“To the criminals a dog is an opportunity for easy money, but to a family or to an older person feeling lonely or isolated a dog is a treasured companion or even a lifeline of support, and it is a source of huge pain if they are stolen.

“Dog theft remains relatively low in Dorset, but we are asking owners to do their bit to help protect their pets and prevent offences from occurring in the first place.”

To help reunite lost and stolen dogs with their families, the Force is urging owners to visit their vet, have their pet microchipped and ensure all contact details are kept up-to-date in the event of moving home or changing a phone number. Microchipping is not only a legal requirement, but is essential in helping to return pets back to their rightful owners.

Other tips include:
• Do not leave your dog unattended if possible. Dogs can be easily stolen from back gardens, vehicles or from outside premises.
• Assess your home and garden boundaries – how easy is it to walk in or climb over your fence? Apart from the obvious fencing, where possible put up trellis on top or against wooden fencing, to make it harder to climb over.
• Gates and entrances need to be locked, and ideally any kennels or pens should not be visible from the street.
• All dogs should wear a collar with identification when in public. Don’t put your dog’s name on the tag, just a surname and contact number.
• If your dog is neutered, it will reduce the chances of the dog being stolen for breeding.
• Change the times and location of where you walk and make sure that your dog is not out of sight.
• Make sure any kennels or outhouses that dogs are kept in are as secure as possible by fitting a good quality padlock with security lighting, alarms and CCTV.

It’s important to establish if your dog has been stolen or is lost. If your dog has gone missing from your garden, please check with your neighbours and ask them to check their gardens and garages. If you still cannot find your dog, check with the local dog warden, tell the microchip company your dog is missing and call local vets and rescue centres.

In the unlikely event that your dog has been stolen, and someone is physically taking your dog from you, shout that your dog is being stolen to attract attention. If you can, take photos or videos and report it to the police by calling 999. If there are any witnesses nearby, ask for their contact details and report your missing dog to the microchip company straight away.

David Sidwick, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “I know both from talking to people across our county and from national surveys that this is of huge concern and, although dog theft itself is thankfully rare, it needs to be addressed.

“As Police and Crime Commissioner I am already working on an action plan to deal with this problem, but part of the solution is to improve our awareness of how to reduce our pet’s vulnerability. So please, follow these simple steps and let’s help make it harder for our dogs to be taken.”

More information about dog safety can be found at www.dorset.police.uk/dogsafety

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

May 29, 2021

Partner Agencies Working Together To Keep People Safe In Dorset This Spring and Summer

Dorset’s partner agencies are continuing to work together to keep people safe during what is expected to be one of the busiest springs and summers on record.

Dorset Police continues to meet weekly with BCP Council, Dorset Council, Dorset & Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service, as well as health colleagues, to plan for the expected influx of visitors during the forthcoming May half term, as well as throughout the summer months.

Step Three of the Government’s roadmap has seen restaurants and bars welcome customers inside for table service and the Force has been working closely with the licensing teams at both local authorities to help support businesses and their staff prepare for the return of the night-time economy.

While reported incidents of anti-social behaviour have fallen by 20 per cent over the last four years in Dorset, July and August are traditionally the peak months. This summer officers from local neighbourhood policing teams will be working alongside community safety accredited officers from the council, COVID marshals and youth workers to carry out high visibility patrols in key hotspot areas to prevent offences from occurring, carry out early intervention work with individuals and their families and provide reassurance to communities.

Planning for the demands of the summer has been underway in Dorset Police for a number of months. Officers will be carrying out visible face-to-face engagement, as well as using social media to keep the public informed about what activity is being carried out to keep people safe.

The key emphasis for the Force is to carry out engagement with the public during high-visibility patrols and implement early intervention measures to prevent crime and help protect the most vulnerable members of our community.

Officers will be focusing on some key areas including anti-social behaviour, violent crime, road safety, domestic abuse, cyber-crime and sexual offences.

Summer Policing Gold Commander Chief Superintendent Mark Callaghan said: “We are fully expecting demand on our resources this summer to be higher than ever before as a result of the continued easing of lockdown restrictions, the reopening of tourism and the night-time economy coupled with the return of some of the county’s most popular events such as Euros 2020, Rugby 7s and the Bournemouth Air Festival.

“The expected restrictions on international travel will inevitably see people visiting Dorset for a staycation and we are working proactively with our partners to coordinate and strengthen plans to keep both residents and visitors safe.

“We are delighted the county has reopened so we can welcome people back to Dorset, but this cannot be at the expense of people’s health. We continue to ask people to stick within the COVID-19 restrictions as we ease through the roadmap so that we do not undo the good work that has already been done.

“We understand that some members of our communities may be feeling nervous about the coming summer months and we would like to reassure them that we are stepping up our patrols and we want to hear from them. If it is not urgent, we would ask people to use our online services first by visiting www.dorset.police.uk/do-it-online.”

All agencies are supporting the Respect, Protect, Enjoy campaign, which aims to remind residents and visitors to respect each other, protect Dorset’s environment while enjoying what the county has to offer. Topics include planning ahead before visiting the county and avoiding having BBQs or camp fires in our forest or heathlands to protect our nature and environment.

Councillor Drew Mellor, BCP Council Leader, said: “We are a leading holiday destination that is proud to welcome millions of visitors each year and this year is no exception. With half term approaching and COVID-19 restrictions now significantly eased, we have planned extensively and are ready for the summer season with all our additional measures in place to provide a safe and enjoyable experience for all. However, I would also strongly remind those intending to visit that they must respect and protect as well as enjoy what the area has to offer and state that action will be taken against those who do not.”

Councillor Noc Lacey-Clarke, Dorset Council’s Lead Member for Environment, Travel and Harbours, said: “We love Dorset and we want visitors to love it and respect it too. Dorset relies on its visitor economy and more than ever our high streets and local businesses need our support, which is why we’re so glad to be able to welcome visitors back this half term.

“We know a small number of visitors to Dorset last summer showed a lack of respect for our beautiful county, so this year, our campaign Promise to Love Dorset targets visitors before they arrive here explaining why Dorset is special and asks visitors to respect our environment, take their litter home, take extra care on our country roads and unpredictable coastline and to be considerate of our residents.”

Assistant Chief Fire Officer Andy Cole, of Dorset & Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service, said: “With the latest easing of COVID-19 restrictions we are expecting more people to visit our beautiful countryside over the half term break. Following the devastating fire at Wareham Forest a year ago we are asking both locals and visitors alike to #BringAPicnicNotABBQ when they enjoy time out and about.

“We have already had a number of heath fires in Dorset since Easter, so we would also ask people to not have campfires and to take care when disposing of cigarettes and matches.

“People staying at home are also asked to stay fire safe, whether they are having a bonfire in the garden or enjoying a barbecue with friends. Please visit our website www.dwfire.org.uk for more advice.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Summer Campaign To Increase Online Reporting

Dorset Police is launching a new summer-long campaign to help reduce demand on their 101 non-emergency number.

The new campaign – whichever way you choose to contact us, #ItsPersonal aims to educate visitors to the area about the different ways to contact the police and explain that every contact the Force receives about a policing issue is answered by a member of the team, whether it’s online or by phone.

The launch will coincide with the May bank holiday and the half term break, which often brings more people to Dorset. This increase in visitors leads to a rise in calls to our 101 non-emergency number, which can inevitably impact on waiting times.

By reassuring anyone who wants to make contact with the police, be that online or over the phone, that their query will be dealt with by a real person, it is hoped more people will choose to use the online contact options and there will be a reduction in the non-emergency call waiting times. If more people use our online contact methods, it leaves the phone lines free for those who might not have access to the internet to contact us.

Anyone wishing to contact us with non-emergency queries or reports can easily access our online options – Request a Call Back, Report Crime Online and Email 101.

Report Crime Online - dorset.police.uk/reportcrime
Report Crime Online is an easy way to report information to us or report an incident or crime. Simply record all the details on the online form then submit the form via our website. Our contact centre staff will receive the form, record the crime, and provide you with a crime reference number.

Make an Enquiry Online - dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/make-an-enquiry-online/
If you want to make a general enquiry, tell us something, ask a question or report a suspicious incident (not happening now) then using the online enquiry form is an efficient way to make us aware of this information.

Alternatively, you can email us via 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk

Report Anti-Social Behaviour Online - dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/asb-and-nuisance-communications/
Use this online form to report anti-social behaviour, which is not happening now. This information allows us to build an intelligence picture of what is happening in your local area to help and support our communities.

Request a Call Back - dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/request-a-call-back/
Simply complete the details on the online form to Request a Call Back from Dorset Police the same day. Request a Call Back can be used to ask questions, report non-urgent crime and receive updates on existing crime.

Alternatively, our contact centre staff are available to answer your calls, day or night should you still wish to call the 101 non-emergency number.

Remember, in an emergency, when life is threatened, people are injured, offenders are nearby or immediate action is required, always dial 999.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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David Sidwick Blog on E-Scooters

I’m very pleased to see Dorset Police taking proactive steps to deal with the illegal use of e-scooters.

Officers have been out and about across Bournemouth talking to riders of private e-scooters, letting them know exactly where they can use these devices legally – and more importantly where they can’t.

They’ve been taking down the details of anyone who’s been seen riding a scooter, and warning them that anyone using them on public land should stop immediately. If they persist, they risk having the item seized and facing prosecution.

The use of e-scooters has shot up over the last few months and I know from talking to members of the public that a lot of people are very concerned about them.

This is particularly the case when they’re ridden along pavements and cycle lanes, as they often are, and there are fears about the safety of pedestrians, especially elderly and vulnerable people.


This concern is very understandable, when you consider that many e-scooters can comfortably travel at 30mph – some even faster – and they are almost silent.

E-scooters were one of the main issues that residents brought up when I was campaigning in the recent Police and Crime Commissioner elections. The volume of e-mails I received about them certainly didn’t diminish after I took up office – in fact, it was raised immediately by many members of the public.

There may be some people who simply don’t like e-scooters because they are a new and innovative device to appear on our streets. I am not one of them. In fact, I believe if used correctly, they could be a transformative form of personal transport.

Unfortunately, they are rarely used correctly and there are significant practical issues. This seems like a classic example of legislation currently not being able to keep pace with
technological developments.

Some e-scooter riders may be using them in all innocence without being aware of the legislation surrounding them, and so the Force’s operation is very much aimed at clearing this up and making sure there is absolutely no room for confusion.

What is the law?

So, to give a quick summary, the only place you can currently ride a private e-scooter is on private land with the landowner’s permission.

That means it’s against the law to use one on any public land – which includes roads, pavements, cycle lanes, beach promenades, bridleways or land such as parks and car parks.

An e-scooter is technically classed as a ‘powered transporter’ and has exactly the same requirements as a car or motorbike – which includes MOT, tax, licensing and insurance. If you ask anyone riding an e-scooter along Bournemouth promenade whether they’ve met that checklist, the chances are you’ll be met with a very blank expression.

All of this means that, if you’re caught using an e-scooter on a public road or pavement, you’re committing a criminal offence, the device could be seized, and you could end up with a fine, penalty points or you could even be banned from driving.

The good news

The good news is that this only applies to private e-scooters. The Government are currently running trials for rental e-scooter schemes across the country. These are the only types of e-scooters that are legal to ride in public, and this includes BCP Council’s Beryl Bikes scheme.

This allows users to ride fully insured rental e-scooters on roads in Bournemouth and Poole, as well as on an expanding network of signed cycle lanes.

Crucially, the scheme demands that users must be over 16 and hold a valid driving licence, which is verified by the company before they’re allowed anywhere near one of their e-scooters.

My understanding is that Beryl manage the scheme very professionally, and anyone found to be breaking their rules is immediately banned. You can report misuse of a Beryl e-scooter here or report a Beryl e-scooter parked in the wrong place by emailing support@beryl.cc or calling 020 3003 5044.

So, if you want to use an e-scooter, this is the way to do it. As I said earlier, e-scooters could transform the way people get about, but it is responsibly run schemes like this that point the way to the future.

As for those people who persist in using private devices recklessly on our roads, I can only repeat the warning from officers – they’re breaking the law and risk prosecution.

But I’m glad to say that, just two weeks into my role as PCC, we have listened to what you – the public – have said and we have acted upon it.

David Sidwick
Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

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Chief Constable James Vaughan Announces Plans To Retire This Autumn

Dorset Police’s Chief Constable James Vaughan has announced plans to retire from policing in the autumn of 2021.

Chief Constable Vaughan began his career in Wiltshire Police in 1992, working in various uniform and detective roles before moving up through the ranks to work in major, serious and organised crime, citizen-focused policing, partnerships and safer neighbourhoods and later he became the Head of CID.

He successfully completed the Strategic Command Course in 2011 and joined Dorset Police as Assistant Chief Constable in May 2012.

After his promotion to Deputy Chief Constable in 2013, Chief Constable Vaughan led on strategic change, planning, performance, professional standards, people and community focus, and media and communication. He also led various regional collaboration programmes, including the forensic service collaboration and the Strategic Alliance with Devon & Cornwall Police.

In February 2017 Chief Constable Vaughan was appointed Deputy Chief Constable (Chief Operating Officer) for the Dorset, Devon and Cornwall Strategic Alliance, before his appointment as Chief Constable for Dorset in April 2018.

He also leads nationally for forensic science for the National Police Chiefs Council and has delivered significant strategic change in forensic delivery through the national Transforming Forensics programme.

He was awarded the Queen’s Police Medal in the New Year’s Honours in 2018.

Chief Constable Vaughan said: “I began to seriously consider retirement this time last year but delayed my decision due to the COVID-19 pandemic, during which I chaired the Local Resilience Forum to coordinate the joint response to the emergency. Moving forward into this year I chose to delay any announcements on retirement to ensure they did not distract candidates and the electorate in the Police and Crime Commissioner elections, which were held in May.

“I will take retirement in the autumn at the end of what is predicted to be a very busy summer. This will allow me to help our new Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick, to develop a new Police and Crime Plan to take the Force through to 2024/25, set a new budget for next year and select a new Chief Constable.

“I wish to offer David Sidwick my heartfelt congratulations and all the very best for the next few years. He had a solid win with a well-informed campaign and I am very confident he will bring new leadership, insight and inspiration to the Force.

“I cannot emphasise enough how very proud I am of the officers, police staff and volunteers who give so much every day to serve and protect the public. I would like to take this opportunity to thank them for the dedication, commitment and professionalism they have shown, especially during the last 14 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. It has not been an easy time for anyone, but they have continued to do all they can to keep people safe.

“Dorset Police is an exceptional organisation providing exceptional services to the public. During recent years Dorset Police has achieved a ‘Good’ rating in all 10 areas inspected by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) and this is something I am immensely proud of.

“I set our organisation the vision of becoming a police force that provides an outstanding service to the people of Dorset; particularly the most vulnerable and I have every belief that this is achievable over the coming years.

“It has been an extraordinary honour and a privilege to lead Dorset Police in a variety of chief officer roles over the last nine years. This is a period in my professional life that I will cherish. Without doubt, the last year has proved to me that this county is made up of strong and caring communities and I am proud to call it my home.

“I will be continuing with a range of volunteering roles that I enjoy, but hope to find more time for my passions surrounding natural history, travel and sailing.

“Finally, I would like to thank my wonderful family for supporting me on this fantastic journey and I look forward to the new adventures that await.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “I would like to thank James on behalf of Dorset’s communities for his unwavering commitment to keeping people safe.

“Since joining Dorset Police as Assistant Chief Constable in 2012, James has shown exceptional leadership during a very challenging period – perhaps best illustrated by his stewardship during the unprecedented public health crisis of the last year or so.

“He leaves a tremendous legacy and the Force is well equipped to meet future demands and tests. Dorset Police is in a strong position, with higher officer numbers, and the foundations to make the county the safest in the UK.

“Over the last three years, I have had the pleasure of getting to know James and I have been conscious for some time that he would likely retire this year. I wish him all the very best when he leaves later this summer.

“Appointing a new Chief Constable is one the most important responsibilities for a Police and Crime Commissioner. I will work to ensure that the best possible candidate is appointed so that Dorset’s communities receive the policing that they expect and deserve.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Dorset Police Crackdown on Suspected County Lines Gangs Results In 14 Arrests

Dorset Police has recently completed a week of intense activity focusing on tackling and disrupting county lines operations across the county.

The operation ran from Monday 17 to Friday 21 May and resulted in 14 arrests being made and £7,100 in cash seized from suspected dealers. As well as cash, officers seized approximately 146 grams of suspected crack cocaine and 90 grams of suspected heroin which, if proved genuine, could have a combined value of £23,600. In addition to cash and drugs, stolen bikes valued at £12,000 were also recovered. Aside from the enforcement activity against suspected drug gangs, safeguarding people vulnerable to exploitation was also a key focus for the week.

In total, 30 safe and well checks were conducted across the county to protect vulnerable people from exploitation by gangs. Sometimes drug dealers set up shop in the home of a vulnerable person; a process called cuckooing. Safe and well checks ensure vulnerable people are not being exploited in this way.

Dorset Police county lines lead, Detective Superintendent Andy Dilworth said: “The disruption of county lines is a priority for us due to the harm criminal gangs cause through the exploitation of vulnerable people. I am delighted with the success we have had during this week; our streets are safer as a direct result of the disruption activity we have carried out.

“However, this work did not take place in isolation. “Although these results followed an intensification week focusing specifically on county lines, we are working on tackling this threat every week of the year to safeguard our communities against organised drug crime.”

Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “I want to praise the hard work of the officers who carried out these arrests, but I’d also like to reassure residents that countering the threat posed to our communities by county lines gangs is an ongoing effort and will be one of my main priorities as PCC.

“Not only do these gangs bring all the harms associated with drug use to our small towns, they also prey on children and vulnerable adults through the destructive practice known as ‘cuckooing’.

“I am intent on working very closely with Dorset Police, as well as a wide range of partners including both our local authorities, to make sure these gangs find it as difficult as possible to operate anywhere in our county. I want them to understand that Dorset is not a good place to ply their toxic trade.”

County lines is the name given to a method of dealing drugs by organised crime gangs by using a dedicated branded mobile phone line. The gangs exploit vulnerable people – including children – by making them deal drugs or by moving into their home and using it base to sell drugs. This is called cuckooing.

If you think someone is being exploited by county lines gangs, please contact us using our non-emergency channels. Alternatively, you can call Crimestoppers, 100 per cent anonymously, on 0800 555 111. Further information on county lines can be found on our website: www.dorset.police.uk/countylines


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

May 27, 2021

Advice Regarding Online Holiday and Travel Fraud

Dear resident,

Following a year of travel bans, quarantine, uncertainty and missed holidays, many of us are desperate to get away for a break, whether it’s a holiday in the sun or a weekend by the sea in the UK.

But cybercriminals are busy thinking about holidays and travel too ... not taking them but exploiting your desperation for a break, with fake websites, advertisements, emails, social media posts, texts and phone calls for holidays, ?ights, accommodation or pilgrimages that don’t exist.

Avoid disappointment and ?nancial losses when booking a trip: start by reading our expert tips on searching and booking holidays and travel safely and securely. Our latest leaflet is attached but if you'd like to read more then visit www.getsafeonline.org

Many thanks
the Get Safe Online team

Attachment: May21_Holiday_Booking_Leaflet.pdf

Message Sent By:
Get Safe Online Admin (Get Safe Online, Content Director, National)

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Legal Use of Electric Scooters

Officers from neighbourhood teams across Bournemouth will be talking to riders of e-scooters to let them know where they can use their privately owned e-scooters legally.

E-scooters, or electric scooters, are two wheeled scooters that are propelled by a motor and have recently experienced a surge in popularity. The only place to legally ride a privately owned e-scooter is on private land with the owner or occupier’s permission.

The Government has announced locations throughout the UK, including Bournemouth, where trials of an e-scooter rental scheme will start to take place. This allows individuals to hire an e-scooter from an official scheme and ride legally. Privately owned e-scooters are not part of this trial.

Concerned about the safety of the rider, pedestrians and other road users, Sergeant Paul Harding said: “We are seeing a lot more people riding e-scooters on pavements, promenades, in parks and even on the road. We are very concerned about the safety of pedestrians, other road users and the riders themselves. Not all riders know that they are classed as powered transport and it is illegal to ride one on public land, this includes roads and pavements. They may find themselves committing an offense under the Road Traffic Act 1988 and, if on the pavement, the Highway Act 1835.”

Local officers are aware that individuals might not realise the legislation when buying them. Sergeant Harding continued: “We don’t want to spoil people’s fun, but we want to keep everyone safe. Almost silent on approach, they can easily knock someone over who steps into their path and current trends show riders, regardless of whether they are legal to use or not, are not wearing the correct personal protective equipment to keep them safe.”

Officers will approach anyone riding an e-scooter and inform them of the law. They will take down the details of the riders and explain where and how e-scooters can be used.
Sergeant Harding concluded by saying, “We advise that if you are using your e-scooter on public land, you should stop doing so immediately. Your e-scooter could be seized, and you could be liable for prosecution for traffic offences.”

David Sidwick, Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, said: “The use of e-scooters has shot up over the last few months and I know from talking to members of the public that a lot of people are very concerned about them – particularly when they’re ridden along pavements and cycle lanes.
“I’m very pleased to see Dorset Police taking proactive steps to tell riders exactly where and how they are allowed to use their e-scooters. This advice is very clear and there should be no excuse for anyone riding one of these scooters illegally anywhere in our county.
“I’d also like to echo the warning given by officers that if anyone persists in using their e-scooter on public land, the device could be seized, and they could be prosecuted.”

Legality of using e-scooters:

The only place you can ride a privately owned e-scooter is on private land with the landowner’s permission.

It is against the law to ride an e-scooter on any public land. This includes roads, pavements, cycle lanes, beach promenades, bridleways, or any publicly accessible land such as parks and car parks.

An e-scooter is classed as a powered transporter and they are treated as a motor vehicle and fall under the Road Traffic Act 1988. They are subject to the same legal requirements as motor vehicles. This includes MOT, tax, licensing, insurance, and specific construction regulations.

If you are caught using a powered transporter (e-scooter) on a public road, pavement, or other prohibited space you are committing a criminal offence and could be prosecuted.

Your e-scooter could be seized, you could end up with a fine, penalty points or even disqualification from driving.

The Government are running trials for renting e-scooters. To find out if these are taking place in an area near you go to their website: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/e-scooter-trials-guidance-for-users

You can find out more about e-scooters and powered transporters here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/powered-transporters/information-sheet-guidance-on-powered-transporters

For more information about the trial e-scooter scheme in Bournemouth click here: https://www.bournemouth.gov.uk/travelandtransport/cycle-and-scoot/e-scooter-share.aspx


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

May 25, 2021

Chief Constable James Vaughan Goes Back To School

Dorset Police Chief Constable James Vaughan went back to school to visit a group of children who had written to him during lockdown.

On Tuesday 18 May 2021 Chief Constable Vaughan visited Hayeswood School in Wimborne to talk to a group of year one students about what it’s like to be a police officer and run a police force.

During the recent lockdown the children aged five and six were asked to write a letter to someone famous as part of their Personal, Social, Health and Economic education (PSHE) curriculum.

Their teacher, Miss Becky Taylor, wanted to drive their attention away from lockdown and get them to focus on their future. Pupils were asked to identify someone they thought was famous and doing something they would like to do.

Five children chose to write to our very own Chief Constable James Vaughan.

Harry said he wanted to be a police officer and can run really fast.

Alfie said he wanted to catch baddies.

While Dexter said he also wanted to arrest baddies and help people, he told Chief Constable James Vaughan that he loves the police and thanked officers for arresting baddies for him.

Fred said he loves to stay fit and healthy and asked the Chief what it was like being a police officer.

Nathan said that he loved our cars and is happy we catch baddies and put them in jail.

Chief Constable James Vaughan said: “I was extremely surprised and honoured to receive these fantastic letters the children had written. They were full of such personality and it was clear they had taken a lot of time and effort to write, so I felt it was only fair that I took the time to visit them and say thank you in person.

“It is important that we engage with our young people and help them see for themselves that police officers are not scary, that we are part of their community and we are here to help and support them.”

Miss Becky Taylor said: “We were thrilled that the Chief Constable took the time to visit us. The children haven't stopped talking about it since.”

Ted, who is six, said: “It was an incredible and fantastic visit. We will always remember it.”

Five-year-old Dexter said: “It was special to meet the Chief Constable. I really liked it when we got to have a photograph with him, and his assistant actually gave us police hats to wear!”

Miss Taylor continued: “I loved the key message he gave the children that police officers have to be kind, clever and strong and they therefore must work hard at school and eat their Weetabix.

“I am certain it will be a wonderful memory for the children for years to come.”


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

May 22, 2021

David Sidwick - What I Plan To Do As Police and Crime Commissioner

I am humbled and grateful to the people of Dorset for electing me as their Police and Crime Commissioner.

I’ve lived in this county all my life, my children were brought up here and my family goes back generations. It is therefore a great honour to represent all of you – and that of course includes those who voted for me in the recent PCC elections, as well as those who voted for one of the other candidates and those who didn’t cast a vote at all.

It’s also an honour for me to work with Dorset Police, which I know is a great organisation full of dedicated, hard working people.

Safest county in the UK

Many of you will already have heard about my vision, which is to make Dorset the safest county in the UK.

I know this is a place we can get to. Over the next few weeks I will be working on a new Police and Crime Plan for Dorset, which will be the roadmap setting out how we can get there.

The plan will be at the heart of all activity carried out by Dorset Police, as well as my own office, over the next three years.

It will have a major impact on how we make our communities safer, so later in the summer I will be asking the people of Dorset about what matters to you and what you think should be included in the plan.

Please, watch this space for more information about how you can make a contribution and have your voice heard.

But first, let me tell you more about some of my own priorities – and what I want to focus on to make Dorset safer.

Focus on cutting crime

Number one on my list is for the police to robustly focus on cutting crime, from the violent crime – which is thankfully rarer here than in our big cities – to the constant grind of anti social behaviour which blights communities and makes people’s lives miserable. I want people to see a clear difference and to feel safer.

I also want to bring back community focused policing to the streets of Dorset. We should increase the number of officers across our neighbourhood teams and make them far more visible, so they play a role in preventing crimes against individuals and businesses. Members of our communities should know who their local officers are and should be able to contact them easily when needed.

We need to fight organised crime, particularly the county lines drugs gangs who have brought violence into some of our towns, but we also need to tackle hidden problems such as domestic abuse, child abuse, hate crime, modern slavery and cyber crime.

Dorset is a proudly rural county, and so we need to deal with those crimes which have a terrible impact on our farmers and people who live in small isolated villages, but which often take place away from the media spotlight.

I want to significantly increase the rural crime team and their capabilities, and I want to develop specific strategies to tackle problems affecting our rural communities such as burglary, anti social behaviour and farm theft.

Putting victims first

But above all, we’ll put victims and communities at the heart of everything we do, because it is for these people that we need to bring about change. We need to support all our victims, particularly older and more vulnerable people, but we also need to help build up strong and resourceful communities.

There’s also a huge resource of talented and passionate volunteers across our county – from Neighbourhood Watch and Community Speedwatch teams to our inspirational Police Cadets – and we need to do more to tap into that.

Finally, we need to make sure every penny counts when it comes to police funding.
This is your money, which you pay through your council tax year in year out. We need to make sure we properly resource the front line and reduce unnecessary expenses so police teams can spend more time engaging with our communities, gathering intelligence and making people feel safer.

And if we get all that right, we’ll make our police crime fighters again, and Dorset will be well on the way to becoming the safest county in the UK.

David Sidwick, Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

May 20, 2021

Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Today we visited a couple who reported a scam in Christchurch Waitrose car park on the 10th May. Two white females slim build wearing smart clothes with a clipboard were asking for signatures supporting a Hard of Hearing charity. The females asked to see proof of ID for the signatures. Whilst the couple were distracted they took £340 from the victim's wallet. The couple challenged the females and managed to get the money back. Please be aware of your personal safety whilst out and about. #5331 #5699 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice #DorsetPolice

Attachments:
20210518_161208.jpg


Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

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Protect Your Pooch - A New Dog Theft Campaign Launched By Neighbourhood Watch

In response to the increased fear of pet theft, Neighbourhood Watch has launched our PROTECT YOUR POOCH campaign.

The campaign will run on social media from 17th – 30th May but those who do not use social media can support the campaign by displaying this poster in their community, or attending our online Dog Theft webinar on the 27th May at 5pm. The webinar will be led by Neighbourhood Watch Network with speakers from the Met Police and Crimestoppers, as well as special guest speaker Katy Bourne, PCC for Sussex. To book your place, click here.

The PROTECT YOUR POOCH campaign encourages people to keep their pets SECURE, IN SIGHT and SEARCHABLE, and to HELP MAKE PET THEFT A SPECIFIC CRIMINAL OFFENCE. The Met Police and Crimestoppers are backing our SECURE, IN SIGHT and SEARCHABLE message. More information on the campaign can be found on www.ourwatch.org.uk/protectyourpooch.

You can support the campaign by acting on our advice and sharing our messages in the following ways:

1: Follow us on our social channels (Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn) to share our messages within your communities
2:
Print this poster and display it in your community
3: Share this campaign image on your local Whatsapp groups
4: Help make pet theft a specific criminal offence by signing a petition or writing to your MP. Find out more on www.ourwatch.org.uk/protectyourpooch
5: Attend our online Dog Theft webinar on 27th May, 5pm. Book your place here.


About guest speaker Katy Bourne, PCC for Sussex
Katy Bourne is in her third term as Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) for Sussex. She was first elected in 2012, re-elected in 2016 and again in 2021. The PCC’s role is to hold the Chief Constable to account for the performance of the Force; effectively making the police answerable to the communities they serve.

Katy is responsible for setting the strategic direction and priorities for Sussex Police through the Police & Crime Plan. This includes setting the police budget and local police precept – the amount residents pay for policing in their council tax. She also has a statutory duty to deliver community safety initiatives including Restorative Justice and crime reduction grants, along with commissioning support services for victims of crime.

Her genuine passion and commitment to making a difference has won her praise from successive Home Secretaries and Prime Ministers and in June 2019 she was awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours.



For anybody who wishes to have a PROTECT YOUR POOCH campaign pack, please email Deborah.waller@ourwatch.org.uk.

Keep safe,
NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH NETWORK, Central Support Team

Follow us: ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn
Neighbourhoood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349


Message Sent By:
Deborah Waller (NWN, Senior Digital and Communications Manager, England and Wales)


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