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Neighbourhood Alert Reports

These reports are as received from the Police Cooordinators, and not edited by me
November 26, 2021

Hundreds Fall Victim To Lottery Scams In Just Seven Months

What is lottery fraud?


Criminals will contact unsuspecting victims informing them they have won a lottery or prize draw. The victim is then informed that they will need to pay an advance fee in order to receive their winnings. In reality, the winnings are non-existent and it is an attempt to steal the victims money, personal or financial information.

Between April and October 2021, Action Fraud received 629 reports of lottery fraud, with 89 per cent of reports mentioning well-known prize draws. Impersonation of People’s Postcode Lottery accounted for almost half (49 per cent) of all reports. Almost three quarters of victims (70 per cent) were aged over 50, with those aged over 65 accounting for 40 per cent of reports.

Fraudsters use gift cards as a form of payment as they can be easily redeemed and sold on. The criminals don’t need the physical card to redeem the value as they ask the victims to share the serial code on the back of the card with them. In other instances, victims reported being asked for personal and financial information in order to obtain their alleged winnings. Some victims reported providing their bank details thinking they would be sent a small payment to verify the account. In reality, criminals will use these details to steal the victim’s money.


How to protect yourself

Stop: Unsolicited offers of large sums of money in return for a small upfront payment should always raise a red flag. Taking a moment to stop and think before parting with your money or information could keep you safe.

Challenge: Could it be fake? Remember, you can’t win a prize in a competition you didn’t enter. It’s okay to reject, refuse or ignore any requests. Only criminals will try to rush or panic you.

Protect: If you think you’ve been a victim of fraud, contact your bank immediately and report it to Action Fraud online at actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.
You can find further protection advice around lotteries and competition on the Gambling Commission’s website.



For more of the government’s latest advice on how to stay secure online, visit the Cyber Aware website: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/cyberaware


Message Sent By:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

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Force Urges Caution When Seeking Out Deals Over Black Friday and Cyber Monday

As shoppers look for bargains over Black Friday and Cyber Monday, Dorset Police is urging people to take care and consider whether some deals are too good to be true.
In the run up to Christmas, Black Friday and Cyber Monday have become two of the biggest shopping days of the year, with many retailers offering enticing discounts.
Black Friday, which originated in the United States of America to mark the day after Thanksgiving, takes place on Friday 26 November 2021. It has grown into an international event for consumers to buy goods at reduced prices ahead of the busy Christmas shopping period.
Cyber Monday falls on Monday 29 November 2021 and many online retailers use it to entice consumers with a variety of deals.

Unfortunately, while shoppers can save money during these shopping days, it also gives potential criminals the opportunity to scam victims with fraudulent offers.
Detective Inspector Andrew Kennard, tactical lead for fraud at Dorset Police, said: “Many people love getting a deal, but sometimes they can be too good to be true.

“Being targeted by fraudsters can be terrible at any time, but especially in the run up to Christmas. Unfortunately, there are people who will use the goodwill of the season to target people when their defences might be a little lower.
“Don’t get caught out. Always buy from a reputable retailer, never disclose banking or security details, and don’t part with any money if your instincts are telling you that something doesn’t feel right. If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, please report it to Action Fraud by visiting actionfraud.police.uk or calling 0300 123 2040.”

Dorset Police will be using Cyber Monday as an opportunity to share information and tips for how to keep yourself safe online. As well as safe shopping tips, there will be information for businesses, how to keep your kids safe online, and more.
Chris Conroy, Cyber Crime Protect and Prevention Officer at Dorset Police, said: “Many of us don’t realise just how much information we’re making available online. We want to equip people with knowledge and practical tips to stop criminals exploiting this.
“Cyber Monday is a great opportunity for us to share this information with our communities to help them feel safe and secure online.”

Follow Dorset Police on Facebook, @dorsetpolice on Twitter and @dorset_police on Instagram on Monday 29 November 2021. There will also be a live stream on Facebook to give members of the public the opportunity to ask questions.
David Sidwick, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “Tackling and preventing fraud and cyber crime is one of the key focus areas of my Police and Crime Plan.

“Black Friday and Cyber Monday are a fraudsters paradise – so I would ask everyone who shops online to take a moment, review their security measures and the way they share personal details when engaging with others on the internet.
“No matter how confident or competent you may feel when it comes to online shopping, I would encourage everyone to take time to check that you are doing all you can to protect yourself from becoming the next victim of the ever changing nature of cyber crime.”

Message Sent By:
Linzi Berryman (Police, Alert Officer, Communications and Engagement)
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Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

This morning PCSOs Anna and Michelle attended Homefield Grange Care Home to speak to residents regarding scam prevention advice. #5331 #5126 #OnTheBeatDorset #DorsetPolice #christchurchpolice

Attachments
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Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

November 22, 2021

Alcohol Awareness Week

As we come to the end of this year’s Alcohol Awareness Week, which has centred on alcohol and relationships, I wanted my blog to concentrate a little on how alcohol misuse can negatively affect a variety of relationships; at home, at work, socially and publicly and how it can often lead to an increase in criminal and anti-social behaviour (ASB).

As a Police and Crime Commissioner, I look to encourage people to drink responsibility and not let alcohol wreck important relationships. Alcohol is often a key factor in cases of domestic abuse and child neglect. Excessive drinking can rip families apart; but conversely a stable home life can play a key role in helping an offender turn their life around.

Understanding the impacts of alcohol fuelled behaviour in our communities and increasing our collaborative working with key partners, to promote awareness of the issue and help achieve a behavioural change, will ultimately help cut crime and anti-social behaviour in Dorset.

People with a problem drinking habit are more likely to commit a crime when they have been drinking, which in turn, creates increased demand on police resources. Dorset Police received over 8,000 crime reports linked to alcohol between October 2020 and September 2021. Over a third of these reports were for alcohol-related violence against individuals and there were nearly 1,700 reported incidents of ASB fuelled by alcohol.

As the Police and Crime Commissioner and the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners (APCC) co-joint lead for alcohol and substance misuse, I want to elaborate on the positive work that is happening across the country through the work of PCC’s in commissioning schemes and projects to deal with the crime-related outcomes of alcohol and substance misuse.

My office, funds vital projects, such as Drug Link’s Diversion Scheme which aims to increase people’s understanding of low-level offending related to substance misuse. This scheme brings into sharp focus the realities of misuse and addiction to those taking part, highlighting the potential risks of alcohol or drug-fuelled situations and the consequences that substance misuse can have, which can sadly be devastating in some cases, especially when addiction starts to take hold.

My office also funds both Dorset and BCP Councils’ public health bodies to provide a free tailor-made course to those who are going through the community resolution or conditional caution process, where alcohol has been a defining feature of their actions. The course targets making a behavioural change in order to reduce re-offending and gives those taking part, access to the support they need by signposting them to a range of other services and organisations.

My work will continue beyond Alcohol Awareness Week. I will continue to work with our partners on ensuring those with alcohol misuse issues have the chance to take part in schemes and projects to address their problem drinking and consequently, hopefully save their most precious family, work and social relationships, which will in turn have a positive effect on diminishing the levels of alcohol fuelled crime and ASB in our communities.


If you are worried about your alcohol use or if you are concerned about a friend or family member,
Get help now | Alcohol Change UK


David Sidwick
Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

November 21, 2021

The Best Way To Keep Hackers Out of Your Online Accounts

Enabling two-factor authentication (2FA) is the single most important thing you can do to improve the security of your online accounts.



What is 2FA?
Two-factor authentication (2FA) is a way of strengthening the login security of your online accounts. It's similar to how an ATM works. You need both your debit card (first factor) and your PIN (second factor) to get access your account and withdraw cash. The main objective is better security. If your card is stolen, they still need your PIN. If your PIN is stolen, they still need your card.

Enabling 2FA will help to stop hackers from getting into your accounts, even if they have your password.

How do I enable 2FA on my accounts?
Here are links you can use to enable 2FA on some of the most popular online services and apps:

Gmail
Yahoo
Outlook
AOL
Instagram
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn


For more of the government’s latest advice on how to stay secure online, visit the Cyber Aware website: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/cyberaware


Message Sent By:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

November 19, 2021

Public Appeal In Search For Wanted Bridport Man

Officers are appealing for information from the public to help locate a wanted man from Bridport.
John Robert Burton, 38, is wanted by officers to be recalled to prison after failing to attend the necessary probation appointments while on licence.

He has connections to West Dorset, Bournemouth and Poole.
He is described as white, around six feet one inch tall and of medium build with a bald head and was last seen to have a long light brown beard.
Image can be seen via the Dorset police website here.

Detective Sergeant Mark Shields, of Dorset Police, said: “We have been carrying out an extensive number of enquiries to locate John Burton, but these have so far been unsuccessful.
“I am appealing to any members of the public with any information or knowledge as to his whereabouts to please contact us.

“While we do not have any information to suggest Burton presents a risk to the general public, anyone who sees him is urged not to approach him but instead dial 999 immediately.”

If you see John Burton, you should call 999 immediately. Anyone with other information should call 101, quoting occurrence 55210176519 or Crimestoppers in confidence on 0800 555 111.


Message Sent By:
Linzi Berryman (Police, Alert Officer, Communications and Engagement)

November 18, 2021

Cctv Appeal Following Theft from Vehicle In Christchurch

Officers investigating the theft of items from a car in Christchurch are issuing CCTV images of the suspect.

Entry was gained to a vehicle parked in Jumpers Avenue at around 6.20am on Friday 5 November 2021. The offender carried out a search of the vehicle and made off with a pair of Guess sunglasses and a pair of gloves.

Police Community Support Investigator Kate Hann, of Dorset Police, said: “We are continuing to investigate this incident and have obtained CCTV images of the suspect.

“I appreciate his face is partially covered, but I am hopeful someone may be able to recognise him from his clothing and general build.

View images here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13690

“I would also like to take the opportunity to remind motorists in the area to ensure they do not leave their vehicles as easy targets for thieves by removing valuables and locking their vehicles.”

For more vehicle crime prevention advice visit www.dorset.police.uk/help-advice-crime-prevention/home-property/vehicle-crime-removeitlockit/.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210178932. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

November 15, 2021

Force Highlights The Damaging Impact of Booze During Alcohol Awareness Week 2021

Dorset Police is supporting this year’s Alcohol Awareness Week, taking place between Monday 15 and Sunday 21 November 2021, to raise awareness of how alcohol can affect us and our relationships and can contribute to offending behaviour.

The Force is joining over 4,000 other community groups across the UK to mark the week, which this year centres on the theme of alcohol and relationships.

Across the week, Dorset Police will be sharing information about spotting the signs of alcohol reliance and the negative effects it can have on relationships with friends and family.

View full article here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13674


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

November 13, 2021

Missing Christchurch Man Located

Officers searching for missing Christchurch man Nicholas Attwell are pleased to confirm he has been located.

Nicholas was reported missing having last been seen at around 10.15am on Friday 5 November 2021.

Following enquiries by officers, with assistance from colleagues from other forces, he has now been located.

We would like to thank everyone who shared our appeal.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Neighbourhood Watch Webinar Series Continues

I am delighted ro invite you to register for two exciting webinars that we are organising this month.

To coincide with our current campaign regarding tackling Antisocial Behaviour, commonly known as ASB, we are delighted to welcome a guest speaker from the national charity ASB Help to help us RECOGNISE, RECORD and REPORT ASB and how we can help with tackling the issues surrounding ASB.

The webinar is Tuesday 15th November from 5.00pm to 6.00pm and we would love for you to be able to attend. To register for the event, please click HERE and this will take you through to the Eventbrite booking page for the event.

Being able to identify an area where you feel unsafe and the reasons why is important to both police and councils because it enables them to understand where services and resources are needed. As part of a Home Office project funding, Street Safe is a brand new initiative which has been launched across England and Wales to help the public have a platform to help identify these areas for the purpose of providing the information from local people about their local area.

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We are delighted to be able to welcome members of the team that created the platform to explain the reasoning behind it, how the data has been used in areas already, how you can use it and promote it amongst your community, so that local policing teams are able to hear what you are saying make you feel unsafe.

This will be held on Wednesday 23rd November from 5.00pm to 6.00pm we are holding another FREE online event for you to attend. You don't need to be a member to join in, so please share this event with everyone across your networks.
The link for you to register for this event is HERE.

Both of these events are being held online via Zoom and your FREE spaces are available now for you to book. There are limited spaces available and are available on a first come first served bases.

Message Sent By:
Cheryl Spruce (NWN, Head of Membership and Community Engagement , National)

NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH NETWORK, Central Support Team
Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349
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Four Charged In Connection With Reported Disturbance and Assault In Christchurch

Four men have been charged in connection with a reported disturbance and assault at an address in Christchurch.

Dorset Police was called at 12.04pm on Wednesday 3 February 2021 to reports of a disturbance at an address in Somerford Road.

It was reported that a man aged in his 20s was assaulted. He was taken to hospital for treatment to injuries that were not life-threatening.

Four men arrested in connection with the incident have now been charged and are due to appear at court.

Two Bournemouth men, both aged 22, have been charged with violent disorder, attempting to cause grievous bodily harm and possessing an offensive weapon. They are due to appear at Poole Magistrates’ Court on Friday 21 January 2022.

Two further Bournemouth men, aged 48 and 50, have also been charged with violent disorder and are due to appear at Poole Magistrates’ Court on Friday 21 January 2022.

A 43-year-old woman from Bournemouth who was arrested on suspicion of conspiring to cause grievous bodily harm with intent has been released from under investigation and will face no further police action.

A 71-year-old Bournemouth man who was arrested on suspicion of violent disorder remains released under investigation.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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National Knife Amnesty In Dorset

Dorset Police is asking members of the public to support the national week-long knife amnesty – Op Sceptre to help keep communities safe across the county.

From Monday 15 November to Sunday 21 November 2021, police are encouraging the public to ‘Bin a knife… to save a life’ and dispose of unwanted knives and blades at local recycling centres or securely packaged in household waste.

As part of the week of action, police will be running proactive operations and activity in targeted areas across Dorset. The force is also running education workshops in schools with the aim to educate young people about the effects of knife crime, help understand the law, and prevent them from carrying knives. Parents of young people involved in the workshops will also receive letters with information as a follow up to the workshops.

View full article here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13664

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Save The Date - Road Safety Day In Poole

On Saturday 27 November 2021, Dorset Police will be hosting a road safety day at the Dolphin Shopping Centre in Poole from 9am to 3pm. The event will be fun for the whole family, with police vehicle displays, interactive activities and road safety goodies available throughout the day.

Our older drivers area which will be upstairs next to Wilkinson will be offering free bitesize presentations at 10:30am, 12pm and 1:30pm about how you can stay safe on the roads for longer. Reaction testing and other information to assist older drivers will also be on offer. Spaces are on a first come, first serve basis on the day and can’t be booked in advance.

More details will be shared nearer the time via our social media channels, Dorset Alert and in local press. We look forward to seeing you there!

Message Sent By:
Kristian Ward (Communications Manager, Communications and Engagement, Dorset Police)
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Business Crime is Not A Low Priority Or Victimless

According to the British Retail Consortium, the overall cost of business crime, taking into account both losses and crime prevention costs for retail, has risen year on year and now stands at £2.5 billion, up from £2.2 billion last year. This includes crime prevention spending of £1.2 billion and losses to crime of £1.3 billion, of which customer theft makes up £935 million.

In Dorset, the largest area of business crime is retail crime, predominately theft-based offences including shoplifting, of which shoplifting alone accounts for 17% of all business crime.*

In addition, businesses also suffer from criminal damage (9%), public order (7%) and burglary offences (6%) and of course there are serious concerns over the rise in violence against shopworkers. It is reported that there are over 400 assaults on shopworkers per day. This statistic is especially concerning when you think of how many of our sons and daughters, find their first job working in a shop.

Add the above information together and you will see why I say business crime is not a low priority or victimless.

I have spoken to many business owners since starting my campaign to become Police and Crime Commissioner and I have taken notice of their thoughts and concerns about business and retail crime and I have made tackling this issue a feature of my Police and Crime Plan.

This week, I held the first Business Crime roundtable alongside Inspector Helen Deakin, Dorset Polices’ strategic business crime lead, and we spoke with twenty representatives of national groups and local businesses to start the process of creating a Dorset Safer Business Partnership.

The Partnership will be made up of business representatives and trade bodies and will develop strategies that address issues such as retail crime and violence against shopworkers, and also improve confidence in the police.

To gain that confidence, I know that we must build better evidence about business and retail crime by making it easier, and quicker, for incidents to be reported to Dorset Police. It also vital that data sharing methods are improved alongside current lines of communication to ensure that information and updates are shared across the business community in an effective and efficient manner.

I also plan to strengthen business and retail focussed watch schemes, such as Shop Watch and Hotel Watch. I have to say that Dorset’s Hotel Watch scheme is a beacon of good practice for other areas across the country and I commend the hard work that has gone into making it a success.

But the plans don’t stop there. I want to work with businesses on designing out crime, concentrating on ensuring that the best crime-prevention/environmental design advice is given to businesses across the county and that we also work together to tackle the ever-changing nature of cyber-crime.

Once again, there is a lot of work going on behind the scenes to make Dorset the safest county and I am proud to be able to bring together the business community to help me achieve that vision.

David Sidwick
Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

November 10, 2021

Appeal In Search For Missing Christchurch Man

Officers continuing to search for a missing man from Christchurch are renewing their appeal for information.
Nicholas Attwell, aged 60, was last seen at his address in the Purewell area at around 10.15am on Friday 5 November 2021.

He is described as white, five feet ten inches tall and of large build with brown hair that is balding. Nicholas was wearing a black zip-up jacket and blue jeans.
Image can be seen via the Dorset police website here.

Chief Inspector Ged Want, of Dorset Police, said: “We are concerned for Nicholas’ welfare and are keen to locate him to make sure he is all right.
“We have carried out extensive enquiries and these indicate Nicholas may have travelled to the Cheltenham area of Gloucestershire and has been using buses in that vicinity, as well as in Wiltshire and Somerset.
“I would again urge anyone with information as to Nicholas’ whereabouts to please contact us and would ask Nicholas if you see this appeal to please make contact with us or your family.”

Anyone with information or knowledge as to Nicholas’ whereabouts is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210178795.


Message Sent By:
Linzi Berryman (Police, Alert Officer, Communications and Engagement)

November 9, 2021

23M People Used 123456 As A Password

Whether it’s your Facebook, Amazon, or Netflix account, the explosion in popularity of online apps and services means more and more of us have to remember an increasingly long list of passwords.

Unfortunately, some of us cope with this challenge by resorting to practices that leave our data, devices and money at risk - by using the same password across multiple accounts, or by creating simple passwords that could easily be guessed by hackers. Bad password practice is more prevalent than you might think - the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre carried out analysis of passwords leaked in data breaches and found that more than 23 million users worldwide used 123456 as a password. You can read more about it here:
https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/news/most-hacked-passwords-revealed-as-uk-cyber-survey-exposes-gaps-in-online-security

Here are some top tips that will make your life easier and your online accounts more secure:

1: Creating memorable passwords

A good way to create strong, memorable passwords is by using 3 random words. But remember, don’t use words that can be guessed (like your pet’s name). You can include numbers and symbols if you need to. For example, “RedPantsTree4!”

2: Saving passwords in your browser

Saving your password in your browser means letting your web browser (such as Chrome, Safari or Edge) remember your password for you.

This can help:

make sure you do not lose or forget your passwords
protect you against some cyber crime, such as fake websites

It is safer than using weak passwords, or using the same password in more than one place.

Here are some useful links on how you can start saving passwords in your browser: Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Firefox, Safari.


3: Email account passwords

If a hacker gets into your email account, they could:

reset your other online account passwords
access personal information you have saved about yourself or your business

Your email password should be strong and different to all your other passwords. This will make it harder to crack or guess.

Need help changing your email account password? You can use these links to find step by step instructions: Gmail, Yahoo! Mail, Outlook, BT, AOL Mail.

For more of the government’s latest advice on how to stay secure online, visit the Cyber Aware website: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/cyberaware


Thanks for reading! If you found this information useful, please help us spread the word by forwarding this email to your friends.


Message Sent By:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

November 7, 2021

National Safer Gambling Week - When The Fun Stops

Raising awareness on problem gambling in National Safer Gambling Week.
Gambling harm can affect anyone, either directly or indirectly, and it destroys families and lives. There are an estimated third of a million problem gamblers in England and Wales; tragically, on average, one problem gambler commits suicide every day.

While many people enjoy gambling safely, others can develop a serious addiction and addiction can lead to crime.

The direct cost to government of gambling-related crime is estimated at £162.5 million annually, ranging from theft and fraud to domestic abuse. In truth, it could be much higher, as there is still limited research to help us to understand and address what is often a hidden problem.

In my role as the Joint Lead for the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners - Addictions and Substance Misuse Portfolio, I am keen to work with the Government, and both local government and health agencies to improve how we tackle this issue.

I have already met with Alex Macey from Gamvisory, who was able to give me a much deeper insight into the issue and the effect problem gambling has, not just on the individual involved but their families and friends. I believe it is incredibly important to learn from those who have first-hand knowledge and experience if we are to successfully address how best to tackle the problem.

In my Police and Crime Plan, I have highlighted actions to target addiction and its impact on crime and one of my first actions will be to host a briefing session for other Police and Crime Commissioners with input from the government and national agencies to raise awareness and identify ways of tackling gambling crime.

I will be working towards securing, a regional joined-up, approach on drug dealing, substance misuse and gambling addiction, so that the entire South West works together to reduce this risk. It’s important, not only to get partners to recognise the effects of gambling addiction and crime, but also to act and work together to affect a positive change.

There are also some quick-time positive actions that can be made, for example, my office is working with Dorset Police Custody and the Criminal Justice Liaison and Diversion service to identify and monitor how many detainees have a gambling addiction – which hasn’t been done before. This will help give some much-needed information about the size of the problem in our county.

There is a lot of work to be done, but I hope that in the near future, I can write about the changes we have made to address this issue, from a partnership perspective.

Finally, if you or someone you know is struggling with gambling-related problems, I would encourage you to contact the National Gambling Helpline which provides free advice, information and support around the clock to those suffering from gambling related harm, whether their own or someone else’s.

David Sidwick
Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset

To find out more about hate crime and how to report it please click on this link - dorset.police.uk/hatecrime

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

November 5, 2021

Overall Crime Continues To Drop For Dorset Police

Dorset Police has seen a 6.0 per cent drop in recorded crime, according to new figures released on Thursday 4 November 2021, and has the ninth lowest crime rate in England & Wales.
Data released by the Office for National Statistics show the Force has continued to see a drop in overall crime for the sixth consecutive quarter and covers the 12 months to the end of June 2021.
Dorset Police recognises the impact of COVID-19 throughout the last year and the effect the lockdown periods had on the reduction of some crime types. The Force responded and maintained a strong focus on preventing and detecting crime that affects the most vulnerable members of our communities, for example, Domestic Abuse, serious sexual offences and violent crime.

Deputy Chief Constable Sam de Reya said Dorset continues to be one of the safest counties in the country to live and visit.
“Whilst the impact of the pandemic resulted in some crime reduction, we experienced an extremely busy summer period in Dorset with the county receiving over 25 million day visitors throughout the year. In addition, the opening of hospitality, large public events and limited international travel increased significant demand upon our policing services. We have worked hard to ensure we managed that demand, prioritised our resources and delivered policing services keeping residents and visitors safe in our communities.
She continued: “The published data shows a sustained reduction of crime throughout the year, demonstrating the hard work and professionalism of our officers and staff who have continued to deliver services in a challenging policing environment.”

The latest figures show that compared to the national data, Dorset has delivered a reduction in violence against the person offences – a reduction of 1.9 per cent in Dorset compared to an increase nationally of 8.0 per cent.
Violence with injury dropped by 7.0 per cent, compared to the national average that was down by 3.7 per cent. Victim Based Crime saw a reduction from 46,116 to 42,972, a decrease of 6.8 per cent.
The total number of crimes reported reduced from 51,997 to 48,873 over the 12 months to the end of June 2021, reducing 4.0 crimes per 1,000 of the population.
The Force has supported and safeguarded the most vulnerable in our communities and provided a safe environment for victims, and encouraged them to come forward and report crimes.
We have seen increased large scale public events, including the Euro’s and the Bournemouth Air Show, and the return of a lively night-time economy, which has contributed to an increase in some crime types. We continue to work with our partners and local businesses to address local needs and keep people safe in Dorset.
The Force is focused on reducing violence against women and girls by targeting crimes such as sexual offending and domestic abuse, providing meaningful support to victims, and proactively policing crime hotspots and high harm offenders to prevent offences from taking place. The Force has seen an increase in all sexual offences by 3.4 per cent; however, this compares to the national increase of 7.9 per cent. Whilst rape offences have decreased by 1.4 per cent compared with a national increase of 9.6 per cent.

Deputy Chief Constable Sam De Reya said: “Through the Force action plan, we are committed to reducing and preventing sexual offences, including rape. Through investment, we are increasing the number of specialist trained officers to improve investigation standards, working with our partners to improve the journey for victims and increase positive outcomes. We will continue to encourage victims to report offences and robustly investigate those responsible and bring offenders to justice”.

David Sidwick, Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, said: “Last Friday, I launched my Police and Crime Plan for Dorset, and the vision, which lays at the heart of that Plan, is for Dorset to become the safest county in England and Wales.
“Therefore, I am very pleased to see that the ONS stats have shown a 6.0 per cent drop in recorded crime in Dorset, and I am even more pleased to see that Dorset is in the top ten for the lowest crime rate in England & Wales. I acknowledge that this report falls within the auspices of the COVID-19 pandemic; however, Dorset has also continued to see a drop in overall crime for the sixth consecutive quarter.
I know that both the Chief Constable and I are determined to drive down crime in Dorset, in order to achieve the ambition of our county becoming the safest place in England and Wales”.


Message Sent By:
Linzi Berryman (Police, Alert Officer, Communications and Engagement)

October 30, 2021

Appeal For Information Following Racially Aggravated Public Order Incident In Christchurch

Officers investigating a racially aggravated public order incident in Christchurch are appealing for witnesses or anyone with information to come forward.

The incident occurred at around 12pm on Monday 18 October 2021 at the Banks Close Car Park off Christchurch High Street. It was reported that a man and a woman were walking in the car park and a vehicle, believed to be a silver Toyota, narrowly missed them as it was manoeuvring to park.

The man confronted the driver of the vehicle and a female passenger in the car responded by shouting antisemitic abuse at the victims before the male driver pushed the man.

Police Constable Ryan Higgins, of Dorset Police, said: “We take all reports of hate crime very seriously and are carrying out a number of enquiries into this incident.

“I understand that there were a number of people in the area at the time and I am keen to hear from any witnesses who have not already spoken to police as well as anyone who may have relevant mobile phone footage.”


Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210168453. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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New Police and Crime Plan For Dorset

Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick has today unveiled his Police and Crime Plan aimed to make Dorset the safest county in England and Wales.

Speaking about the plan, the Police and Crime Commissioner said “For the last three and a half years, I have had the pleasure of speaking with, and hearing from, thousands of people who live and work throughout Dorset.

“Throughout this time – whether I was researching crime and community safety issues to inform my election manifesto; or executing my duties during my first months in office – the message from Dorset’s communities has been clear: they support my vision that this county should be the safest in England and Wales.”

“There are six priorities in my plan: Cut Crime and Anti-Social Behaviour; Make Policing More Visible and Connected; Fight Violent Crime and High Harm; Fight Rural Crime; Put Victims and Communities First; and to Make Every Penny Count.

The Police and Crime Commissioner continued “Each of the priorities are underpinned by the manifesto commitments I made during the PCC campaign. I have an unashamedly ambitious vision for Dorset and much of the Plan will only be achieved through bold and transformative activity.

“Some of this activity will take time, and skilful collaboration with partner agencies locally, regionally and nationally to realise. It is for this reason that I have set this Plan to cover two terms of office. Despite the challenge, I believe this vision can be achieved.”

“I wanted to become Police and Crime Commissioner because of the shared experiences I had with the people of Dorset. I saw it as my chance to make a real difference and that’s exactly what I intend to do – to make a real difference for my county, its residents, its businesses, and its communities.

I am Dorset born and bred and I have been lucky enough to always call this county my home. It is, already, a safe county, but I am determined that it should be the safest and I will work tirelessly on your behalf to realise that.”

Dorset Police Chief Constable Scott Chilton said: “I welcome the new Police and Crime Plan and look forward to working with the PCC on these priority areas aimed at making Dorset the safest county in the country.

“I am equally keen to ensure our communities are listened too and remain safe with Dorset a hostile place for those choosing to commit crime.

“We cannot do this alone and I know the PCC is focused on collaborative working with our partners whenever possible and to build on strong neighbourhood and strategic relationships we already have across Dorset and the Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole area.

“We will no doubt face some challenges during the coming months and years in terms of funding and ensuring operational policing reflects the priorities in the Police and Crime Plan, but I am committed to working as closely as possible to ensure an outstanding policing service to the people of Dorset.”


Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)
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You Are Invited To Attend Our Free Webinar As Part of Our Serious Crime Event In November

We are delighted to be able to invite you to our FREE online webinar regarding Preventing and disrupting county lines exploitation. This will be held on Tuesday 9th November from 5pm-6pm.

The webinar will focus on providing an in depth view on County Lines exploitation, based on the key principals; exploitation, prevention, protection, and reporting

What is County Lines?
County lines is a form of criminal exploitation where urban gangs persuade, coerce or force children and young people to store drugs and money and/or transport them to suburban areas, market towns and coastal towns (Home Office, 2018). It can happen in any part of the UK and is against the law and a form of child abuse.

We are delighted to welcome expert guest speakers from The Children's Society, County Lines leads, and organised crime county lines coordinators to be part of our panel of presenters.

Event Details

Tuesday 9th November 2021
5.00pm - 6.00pm
Online via Zoom
Register for your FREE place

How to register for the event

Simply register for your FREE space https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/preventing-and-disrupting-county-lines-exploitation-tickets-195017421357
You will receive your link to the event once you have registered.

We look forward to welcoming you to the event as part of our serious crime webinars in November. Look for more details in our November newsletter.

Best wishes
NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH Central Support Team

Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)

October 29, 2021

Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

You said, we did.....

PCSO Anna attended the Burton and Winkton Parish Council meeting on Monday. Speeding was highlighted as a concern especially in Winkton.

PC Glenn and PCSO Anna had a busy morning doing speed checks across Burton and Winkton area with the speed gun. Most drivers were driving sensibly which was great to see.

We will continue to do speed checks when commitments allow. The main purpose of this is to make the roads safer for everyone #5331 #1760 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice #BurtonandWinkton

For further updates follow us on Twitter @dorsetpolice or like us on Facebook at facebook.com/dorsetpolice

Attachments
20211028_102732.jpg

Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

October 28, 2021

Images of Stolen Jewellery Issued In Renewed Burglary Appeal

Officers investigating a burglary at an address in Ferndown are issuing images of some of the stolen items in the hope someone has seen them offered for sale.

Between 6.30pm and 9.45pm on Wednesday 13 October 2021 a burglary occurred at an address in the town.

The victim returned home to find their home had been searched and items of jewellery were taken.

Police Sergeant Rich Barnett, of Weymouth CID, said: “A full investigation is underway into this incident and we have already made efforts to identify who was responsible and find the stolen items, but these enquiries have so far not been successful.

“I am now in a position to issue images of some of the stolen items and I would urge anyone who has seen these being offered for sale to please contact Dorset Police immediately.”

View images here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13552


Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210165622. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

October 25, 2021

Neighbourhood Watch Launches Say No To Asb Campaign

Antisocial behaviour (ASB) incidents have increased over the last three years. Police forces, councils and housing associations are reporting significant spikes in ASB cases – and these are not minor incidents. They are complex and serious cases causing real harm to many people.

45% of people say ASB is a problem where they live, and 56% of those who had either been a victim of or a witness to ASB did not report it to anyone. *


To help tackle the issue, we are running a campaign encouraging people to SAY NO TO ASB.
The campaign will run from the 25th October through to the 21st November on our social channels with key information on recognising, recording, and reporting ASB on our website: ourwatch.org.uk/asb.

We are running a free online ‘SAY NO TO ASB’ webinar on 15th November at 5pm with the charity ASB Help as part of the campaign. Places are limited. To book your place, visit ourwatch.org.uk/webinars.

HOW TO SUPPORT THE CAMPAIGN

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram (see links below) and share our posts to your social channels, including WhatsApp community groups, to encourage more people to SAY NO TO ASB
Download our ‘Recognising, Recording and Reporting ASB Guide’ from ourwatch.org.uk/asb to share with your community
Download our 14-day ‘ASB Diary’ from ourwatch.org.uk/asb to support you in recognising, recording, and reporting ASB incidents in your area.
To find out more and SAY NO TO ASB, visit ourwatch.org.uk/asb.

If you would like a digital campaign pack, please email enquiries@ourwatch.org.uk.

* Data source: Taking Back our Communities - working together to make communities safer report, commissioned in 2021 by RESOLVE, a Centre of Excellence solely focused upon community safety and antisocial behaviour,

Message Sent By:
Cheryl Spruce (NWN, Head of Membership and Community Engagement , National)

NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH NETWORK, Central Support Team
Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349


October 21, 2021

Neighbourhood Watch 2021 Crime and Community Survey Launched

NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH 2021 CRIME AND COMMUNITY SURVEY LAUNCHED

For the second year running, we want to hear your thoughts about crime, community, and how effective Neighbourhood Watch is.

www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CL72YGJ

The survey, launched on Wednesday 20th October 2021, is open to the public across England and Wales, regardless of whether they live in a Neighbourhood Watch area or not.

The results will enable us to better understand on a national and regional level crime, fear of crime and benchmark whether membership to a Neighbourhood Watch scheme, or living in a Neighbourhood Watch area, has an impact on levels of crime, concern about crime, neighbourliness, and the willingness of communities to work together.

Last year our survey received just over 30,000 responses from across England and Wales providing us with a rich and useful set of data. This year we will be able to compare our data to last year’s results.

Please share this survey via email and social across all the various communities to which you belong whether they be a Neighbourhood Watch community or others such as sport, religious or work communities. This will help us receive a good balance of responses from Neighbourhood Watch members and non-members which will enable us to compare experiences between these two groups. To help you reach others we have attached a poster that you can print and display locally or share digitally. Alternatively, re-share our social posts (Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn) to your channels.

A good response in all regions will ensure we can publish a national report and provide individual regions with their own reports.

All data will be anonymised and aggregated and will be used by Neighbourhood Watch to ensure our work is effective, inclusive, and representative.

www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CL72YGJ

The survey closes on the 16th of November. Thank you for your support.

Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349


Attachments
Crime and community survey A4 poster.pdf


Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)

October 19, 2021

Hate Crime Has No Place In Our Society


As part of National Hate Crime Awareness week, I wanted to dedicate my blog to raising awareness and encouraging the reporting of this offence to the Police.

As part of National Hate Crime Awareness week, I wanted to dedicate my blog to raising awareness and encouraging the reporting of this offence to the Police.

Let me begin by saying that hate crime, in any form, is abhorrent, the ignorance and prejudice that the perpetrators of this crime show has no place in our society.

Home Office statistics say that nationally, there were 124,091 hate crimes recorded in the year to March 2021 - 92,052 race hate crimes, 6,377 religious hate crimes, 18,596 sexual-orientation hate crimes, 9,943 disability hate crimes and 2,799 transgender hate crimes.
To see a figure of over 92,000 race hate crimes is concerning, especially during Black History Month, an event which is all about understanding, learning and celebrating, the contributions made to our society by African, Asian and Caribbean people.

However, I would like to pick up on one specific type of Hate Crime which I feel rarely gets the attention and coverage that it should - disability hate crime. Disability hate crime has had the largest percentage increase of all hate crime in Dorset and is largely forgotten.

Giving victims a voice and raising awareness of the effects of disability hate crime is a key factor in tacking the issue. My office is currently working with the Force on making a short film where local people share their experiences and talk about the impact of hate crime on them.
To have people with a diverse range of protected characteristics, talking about how they have been affected will I hope, be a powerful and encouraging motivator to others who have experienced hate crime but not felt able to report it to the Police.

The OPCC funds Restorative Justice, a victim focussed scheme by which victims tell offenders the real impact of their crime and as part of that scheme, and a Hate Crime Awareness Course is being developed to deal with low level Hate Crime cases – this is to challenge perpetrators on the impact of their behaviour both on victims, and themselves. This course uses examples of hate crime and how it affected victims, and it works with perpetrators to identify how they might behave differently in future. If victims want it, feedback is given to them on the outcome of the course.

In response to the increase in the number of hate crimes being reported, the Home Office said the rises have been driven by improvements in recording, growing awareness, and a better identification of what constitutes a hate crime. Increased reporting helps the police understand what is happening in our communities and how best to tackle it – so please – report hate crime.

I want people to know that hate crime has no place in Dorset and that I will work tirelessly to encourage tolerance, acceptance, kindness and understanding across our county - after all, the only true measure of goodness is the nobility of the human heart.

David Sidwick
Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset

To find out more about hate crime and how to report it please click on this link - dorset.police.uk/hatecrime

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)


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Dorset Police Works With Partners and Volunteers To Strengthen Multi-Agency Missing Person Response

Partner agencies and volunteers have been supporting Dorset Police to bring through the latest wave of specially trained officers to support the Force’s missing person investigations.
DorSAR (Dorset Search and Rescue), Dorset Search Dogs and HM Coastguard were among the organisations to support the latest Lost Person Search Managers (LPSM) course.
The newly trained LPSM officers will strengthen Dorset’s response to missing people investigations.
Superintendent Heather Dixey, of Dorset Police, said: “We would like to thank all the volunteer organisations and partner agencies for the support they have shown for the latest LPSM course.
“This has helped us to increase the number of specially trained officers in the Force to lead on missing person investigations and the experience has also helped strengthen our multi-agency approach to what can be complex investigations.
“Missing person investigations often involve vulnerable people at a time of crisis and this work demonstrates our commitment to ensuring we follow the best possible practice and make maximum use of the fantastic volunteer and partner agency resources that are available in Dorset.”
DorSAR’s Search Lead Trevor Antell said: “It is valuable to have the opportunity to work with the trainee LPSMs and provide them with the knowledge of what they can expect from us when we are called upon to assist in the search for a vulnerable missing person.
"It also allows our team and the LPSMs to get to know each other in a training environment, which in turn aids the smooth operation when it matters.”


Message Sent By:
Linzi Berryman (Police, Alert Officer, Communications and Engagement)
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Force Offer Advice To Those Who Call 999 By Mistake

Dorset Police is offering advice to callers who accidentally dial 999, in an effort to reduce unnecessary demand placed on operators. The Force has seen an increase in the number of 999 calls recently, many of which are abandoned. There are lots of reasons someone may abandon a call to the emergency services, for example a person calling in a crisis situation who is unable to ask for help.
The most common reason for an abandoned call is someone accidentally ‘pocket dialling’ emergency services. This is where the phone is not locked and accidently calls 999.
A 999 call is recorded as ‘abandoned’ when the line is disconnected before the caller speaks to a member of the emergency services or confirms to a BT 999 operator that they are safe and well.
Superintendent Jared Parkin, Head of Contact Management for Dorset Police, said: "When a 999 call is abandoned, it can waste precious time that could otherwise be spent helping someone with an emergency and potentially saving a life.
"When an emergency call is abandoned without speaking with the caller, operators in the contact centre spend such a long time researching the phone number and associated details to ensure there is no threat or risk to the caller."
Last financial year, 2020/2021, Dorset Police received a total of 111,312 emergency 999 calls, of which 21% were actual emergencies.
Superintendent Jared Parkin continued: "We understand that accidents happen, but if you do call 999 by mistake, please stay on the line to tell us everything is ok – otherwise valuable resources are taken away from answering other calls."

Here are some tips from Dorset Police to reduce the chance of accidental 999 calls:
1. Keep your phone safe and out of reach from children 2. Lock your phone before you put it in your pocket 3. Talk to children about how and when to call for help in an emergency – but how prank dialling 999 for fun can have serious consequences for them and others 4. If you dial 999, stay on the line. Otherwise we will call you back. The police want to know that you are safe and it saves us valuable time. Every second counts.
5. Is your call an emergency? Is there a threat to a life, risk of harm or injury?

Message Sent By:
Linzi Berryman (Police, Alert Officer, Communications and Engagement)

October 14, 2021

Neighbour of The Year Award 2021

THE SEARCH TO FIND THE UK’S BEST NEIGHBOURS CONTINUES!

With just under two weeks left to nominate, people across the UK are invited to participate in our annual hunt for the UK’s NEIGHBOUR OF THE YEAR AWARD – a nationwide search undertaken in partnership with our friends at Co-op Insurance.

Now in its fourth year running, we have introduced a new category: COMMUNITY OF THE YEAR. This Award will celebrate the nation’s most outstanding community and the lengths they’ve gone to support others and make a difference. The ‘community’ can either be in person or virtual, such as over Teams, Facebook or WhatsApp.

To nominate your NEIGHBOUR OF THE YEAR, YOUNG NEIGHBOUR OF THE YEAR (for people aged 21 years and under) or COMMUNITY OF THE YEAR, and to find out more about these incredibly special awards, visit coop.co.uk/noty.

John Hayward-Cripps, CEO at Neighbourhood Watch Network, said: ‘If you have always thought you have good neighbours, why not nominate them? They could be crowned Neighbour of the Year 2021 or Young Neighbour of the Year 2021 if they are 21 or younger. Or nominate a whole community to recognise a group of people who collectively have gone above and beyond to make others smile.’

Nominations close on the 26th of October.


Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349

Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)

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Dorset Police Officer Honoured In National Police Bravery Awards

A Dorset police officer has won the South West regional police bravery award at the National Police Bravery Awards that were held in London last night.

PC Roz Fricker, who was a probationary officer at the time, was badly injured as she tackled an aggressive man who was wielding a hammer and threatening members of the public. She joined more than 90 colleagues across England and Wales who were all nominated for their courageous acts at the prestigious awards event in London.

View full article here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13458

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

October 9, 2021

Have Your Say on Potential Changes To Firearms Licensing

This week I am asking you to take part in the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners (APCC) survey on potential changes to the licensing of firearms and shotguns in England and Wales.

The survey asks for the public’s views on things like the amount of scrutiny of medical records and social media posts that police should undertake when granting or renewing a licence; and whether or not an applicant should pay the full costs of having their request processed.

Following on from public concerns after the recent tragic events in Keyham, where 5 people lost their lives, the Home Office is currently reviewing arrangements for the licensing of guns and will shortly be introducing new statutory guidance to be followed by all police forces.

The public may be surprised to hear that there just over 10,000 licence holders in Dorset, and more than half a million licence holders in England and Wales, who legally own nearly 2million firearms and we know that the overwhelming majority do so safely and responsibly.

Our county is home to both urban and rural communities and so there are going to be many differing opinions on this subject – I know many farmers who see owning a gun as an essential part of their job and I know that there are many residents across the county who are members of a gun club and shoot as a pastime.

Equally, I know many people who simply cannot understand why any form of gun ownership is necessary and so it is important that all these voices, all these opinions are heard.

I very much welcome this survey, it is absolutely right that there is a public discussion on this issue and even more important that any changes to guidance and legislation are, well thought-out, proportionate and most of all ensure that the very highest levels of public safety are met.

The survey, which can be completed online, takes just a few minutes and will remain open for responses until Wednesday 20 October.

David Sidwick
Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

October 7, 2021

Thank You To Our Communities As The Busy Tourist Season Comes To A Close

Dorset Police is thanking its communities for their patience and continued support as the county’s busy tourist season comes to a close.

The Force’s Summer Policing operation ran from Thursday 1 April to Thursday 30 September 2021 and involved extensive planning to enable the Force to meet the demands of what has been one of the county’s busiest ever spring and summer.

The restrictions on international travel, return of key events and reopening of the night-time economy as part of the COVID-19 roadmap saw an increase in the number of people visiting Dorset.

This year Dorset Police worked closely alongside partner agencies, including weekly meetings and officers embedded into two Multi Agency Command Centres in Bournemouth and the west of the county.

A number of key operations and campaigns were launched in the county in a bid to keep residents and visitors safe. This included Operation Relentless, the Force’s drive to reduce anti-social behaviour, and Don’t Regret Your Night Out where the Force partnered up with local taxi companies to reduce violent crime. A targeted drink and drug drive campaign also ran for six weeks in July and August to coincide with the full unlocking of the hospitality industry.

Work continued in the county to tackle drug misuse and county lines gangs, with a focused week of intensification that led to 14 arrests in May and the Force joining colleagues from British Transport Police for a day of action in Weymouth. A #KnowTheSigns awareness campaign was also launched to raise awareness among the public to recognise the signs of county lines and report concerns to the Force.

This summer the Force also encouraged members of the public to use our digital contact channels to enable demand to be manged more effectively especially during a time of reduced staffing as a result of COVID-19 isolations. During one week in July around 35 per cent of staff in the Force Command Centre were off at a time when 999 calls had increased by 21 per cent and 101 calls by 11 per cent compared to the previous week.

Serious violence and sexual offences remain a priority for the Force and this summer saw the launch of Operation Vigilant in Bournemouth and Weymouth town centres.

Operation Vigilant is proactive policing based on the use of both covert plain clothed officers and high-visibility patrols during the night-time economy to spot and intervene in instances of aggressive, predatory and intrusive sexual behaviour.

An initiative to reduce the number of catalytic converter thefts was also launched following a 368 per cent rise in reports between January and June 2020 and the same time this year. Following an awareness campaign providing crime prevention advice offences fell by 94 per cent.

Chief Superintendent Mark Callaghan, Summer Policing Gold Commander, said: “This year was always going to be a challenge for policing as the COVID-19 restrictions lifted and more people visited the county because they were unable to travel abroad.

“We saw the return of some key events in the county, including Euro 2020, Bournemouth 7s and Bournemouth Air Festival, that placed additional demand on our services.

“The support the Force received from the public this summer must not be underestimated.

"We faced significant challenges with staff in our Force Command Centre having to isolate, but our communities listened and contacted us using our digital channels so those members of staff working from home could respond.

“We have also received overwhelming support from our special constables and police staff volunteers who have given up over 14,000 hours during our summer policing operation. They give up their own time to support the Force and we are proud to have them in our policing family.

“I would like to praise the Force’s officers and police staff for the unwavering commitment and professionalism they have shown during what has been a difficult 18 months. We fully acknowledge it has not been easy as some had their rest days cancelled and were moved onto 12-hour shifts to enable us to meet the demands of the summer.

“Finally, as we move into the autumn and winter, I would like to reassure our communities that our focus on driving down anti-social behaviour, drug misuse, violent crime and serious sexual offences continues and our officers will remain out there in our communities to ensure the public are safe and feel safe.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “The summer ‘staycation’ season has been a challenging one for the Force and its partner agencies and I would like to thank everyone who has worked so hard over the summer to keep our residents and visitors safe.

“I am delighted to see that the Force has put in place such a range of important operations and campaigns, in particular Op Relentless and Op Vigilant. Many people will know that tackling ASB and fighting crime and high harm are two of the main priorities that will come to feature in my Police and Crime Plan for Dorset and I can reassure residents and visitors alike that I will continue to work with the Chief Constable to ensure that they remain a priority for the Force."


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Update - Wanted Man from Gillingham Located

Officers carrying out searches to find wanted Gillingham man Nicholas Castle are pleased to confirm he has been located.
Castle, aged 24, was wanted on prison recall after breaching the conditions of his licence.
Following enquiries by officers and a public appeal, he has now been arrested and is assisting officers with their enquiries.

Message Sent By:
Linzi Berryman (Police, Alert Officer, Communications and Engagement)

October 6, 2021

Warning To Public Following Scams Involving Whatsapp

Dorset Police is urging the public to remain vigilant following reports of scams involving WhatsApp messenger.


At around 1.50pm on Sunday 3 October 2021 it was reported that the victim – a woman aged in her 70s from Bournemouth – received a message on WhatsApp purporting to be from a family member in need of urgent help.

The message from an unknown number said that their phone was broken and they needed to urgently transfer money to another bank account.

The victim transferred money to the bank account on behalf of the offender purporting to be a family member. The transaction was later picked up by her bank and the money was returned.

A further report of a similar scam was received at around 9.45am on Monday 4 October 2021. On Friday 1 October 2021 the victim – a man aged in his 50s from Bournemouth – received a message purporting to be from a family member asking for money.

The victim was asked to send money via a link to an invoice provided in a message.

Investigations Officer Martin Forder, of Dorset Police, said: “We would like to make the public aware of this scam and encourage anyone who has been a victim of a similar incident to please report it to Dorset Police and Action Fraud.

“If you receive this type of message, please check the authenticity of it. If you are in any doubt, do not engage with these messages or send any money.

“We would ask people to look out for elderly family members or neighbours and make sure they are aware of this potential scam.”

Anyone who believes they have been targeted by scammers is asked to report it to Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101. Please also report it to Action Fraud at www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Appeal To Find Wanted Man from Gillingham

Officers are appealing for information from the public to help locate a wanted man from Gillingham.

Nicholas Castle, aged 24, is reported to have breached the conditions of his licence and is therefore wanted on prison recall.

He is described as white, around five feet eight inches tall and of slim build with short brown hair.

View image here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13375

Inspector Simon Perry, of Dorset Police, said: “We have been carrying out a number of enquiries to locate Nicholas Castle, but these have so far been unsuccessful.

“I am appealing to any members of the public with any information or knowledge as to his whereabouts to please contact us.

“While we do not have any information to suggest Castle presents a risk to the general public, anyone who sees him is urged not to approach him but instead dial 999 immediately.”

If you see Nicholas Castle, you should call 999 immediately. Anyone with other information should call 101, quoting occurrence 55210158149 or Crimestoppers in confidence on 0800 555 111.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

October 2, 2021

Protecting The Most Vulnerable In Our Society

On the 30th anniversary of the International Day of Older Persons, I would like to talk a little about the elements of the Police and Crime Plan that will directly address some of the issues and concerns that our older residents and visitors may have.

There can be no doubt that it is important to reduce the effect and fear of crime that our older residents may experience and to that end, the Police and Crime Plan will address three important areas.

Cutting crime and anti-social behaviour

Cutting crime and anti-social behaviour continues to be a big issue not just for me, but for many older residents and groups across the county.

I’m very pleased to say there have been a lot of developments in this area. Firstly, the Force has launched Operation Relentless – a clear focus on tackling anti-social behaviour and making sure the public know it won’t be tolerated in the county.

I’ve also launched my own Operation Relentless Community Fund, in which members of neighbourhood groups and charities can apply for money to fund projects that will enable them to tackle anti-social behaviour and make people feel safer in their own community.

So, if you or a group that you are part of have an idea on how to improve your local area, then please make an application to the Fund.

Making policing more visible and connected

Bringing back community focused policing to the streets of Dorset and improving the connections between the police and the public is another major priority, and I’m glad to report there has been a lot of significant progress in this area as well.

Dorset Police has been able to recruit over fifty additional officers as part of the Government’s uplift programme, and I am pleased to say that the majority of those officers have already gone directly into policing your neighbourhoods.

The Neighbourhood Engagement Commitment initiative, which sets out how communities can communicate as effectively as possible with their local officers has been reviewed and I will be ensuring that the Neighbourhood Policing Teams keep their promises to provide localised services that work for our communities.

The number of Special Constables will increase by 25%, boosting the amount of people from across our neighbourhoods who will be performing these important voluntary roles.

Preventing Fraud and Cyber-crime

The other area that I will be addressing through the Police and Crime Plan is the effect that fraud, scams and cyber-crime can have on our older communities.

I will be addressing the need for an increase in provision of prevention advice to those who are most vulnerable to fraudsters and increasing the support to help victims liaise with banks and building societies.

There is already a good source of advice and information available via the Dorset Police website and I would invite you to take a look and perhaps, if you represent community group even take advantage of the free cyber security awareness presentations made available to you by the Forces Cyber Protect Officer.


David Sidwick
Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

September 25, 2021

Fixing The Future

All too often, many of the problems in society are attributed to young people.

Young people are seen by some as having nothing better to do and are regularly vilified as being responsible for causing nuisance and disorder, as well as other issues.

I know this perception is incorrect, and young people should never be lumped together as a group to be feared. Indeed, teenagers are more likely to be victims of crime than perpetrators.
When it comes to youth, it’s incredibly important we get it right. It’s vital we tap into the enormous potential our young people have and steer them towards making better choices.

Thankfully, there are several organisations across Dorset which are already doing an incredible job of providing them with this guidance.

I am delighted to see the opening of two new cadets’ units – one in Poole and another in Weymouth. I’ve been fortunate enough to visit one of the units already running in Bournemouth and have seen for myself how young lives are being turned around.

I’d been invited to sit on the judging panel for a Dragon’s Den style event, in which cadets were asked to deal with an anti-social behaviour scenario, very similar to those ones which police officers and council staff have to respond to on a regular basis.

It was fascinating to hear their suggestions and to see them bounce ideas around as they attempted to come up with solutions.

The teenagers I met there were fulfilling useful roles in their communities, as well as developing confidence and life skills such as communication and team building which will stand them in good stead for whatever they choose to go on and do.

I campaigned for the cadet’s scheme to be expanded and it’s great news for young people in Poole and Weymouth that they will now have these opportunities. I look forward to visiting both new units over the coming years and I hope to see even more cadet units in the future.
But good as it is, this scheme will never be for everyone.

Future Roots is an organisation that uses one of Dorset’s greatest resources – the rural environment – to offer young people the chance to boost their wellbeing and reach their potential.

I visited the service at their farm near Sherborne earlier in the summer to see how the hands-on activities they provide, such as caring for animals, helps young people become more comfortable with who they are, build confidence and identify their strengths.

It’s led by Julie Plumley, a farmers’ daughter who went on to have a long career in social work and decided to create an organisation that combined the best of both worlds. She stresses that young people don’t go there because they are ‘naughty’ or ‘bad’ but because they need a safe and secure learning environment.

The traditional school setting doesn’t work for every child, and Julie told me about many examples of families and young people who have found the solution they were looking for at Future Roots. This includes teenagers who had been excluded from school, who had become known to the police, as well as those who were just unable to cope with lockdown. Their lives had been transformed simply by working among animals in the fresh air.

I also learned about other opportunities available for our young people when I visited the Dorset Youth Association in Dorchester recently as guest speaker at their 0-25 VCS forum event.

As well as being a chance for me to find out more about the association’s work to improve the lives of children and young people, it enabled me to connect with a wide range of people in the voluntary and community sector, to find out more about some of the challenges they face.

I am making commitments in my police and crime plan, not only to cutting crime and anti-social behaviour, but to putting our community first. That means making sure young people are not left behind, and by working with a wide range of partners we provide proper support for those who are struggling.

Fixing the future by addressing the problems our young people face is a big challenge which goes far beyond policing. But it’s important we do what we can to give them the right tools to make the right decisions.

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

September 18, 2021

The Search is on For The UK's Best Neighbour

THE SEARCH IS ON FOR THE UK’S BEST NEIGHBOUR!

People across the UK are being invited to take part in our annual hunt for the UK’s ‘Neighbour of the Year’ – a nationwide search undertaken in partnership by Co-op Insurance and Neighbourhood Watch.

Now in its fourth year, 2021 sees the introduction of a new category: Community of the Year. This award will celebrate the nation’s most outstanding community (could be a street, a sports club, a faith collective, or anything in between, either in person or virtual, such as a WhatsApp, Facebook, or Slack group) and the lengths its members have gone to to support others and make a real difference.

To nominate your Neighbour of the Year, Young Neighbour of the Year (for people aged 21 years and under) or Community of the Year, and to find out more about these very special awards please visit coop.co.uk/noty.

If you have any questions get in touch with us via enquiries@ourwatch.org.uk.


Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349

Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)


September 11, 2021

Community Speed Watch Day of Action Sees Over 300 Warning Letters Issued To Motorists

Over 140 volunteers who give their spare time to reduce speeding in their towns and villages have taken part in a day of action with 335 drivers being issued with warning letters.

The education and enforcement event saw 35 teams carry out 48 one hour sessions across Dorset on Tuesday 7 September with 58 per cent of those speeding being from Dorset.

Community Speed Watch is run through Dorset Police and provides an opportunity for volunteers to work within their community to raise awareness of the dangers of speeding and to help control the problem locally.

Teams use radar detection devices to monitor drivers exceeding the speed limit at locations agreed with Dorset Police. This equipment does not record an image so the volunteers record the vehicle details and pass these to the Force for their vehicle and driver information to be checked before a warning letter is issued.

View full article here:https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13217

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Last Chance To Have Your Say on Plans To Make Dorset Safest County

Dorset residents are being reminded that this is their last chance to have their say in a survey on policing and crime in the county.

Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick's survey, which asks people to provide information about what is important to them, is coming to a close.

To complete the survey online go here.

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “This is your chance to tell me and Dorset Police what you want us to prioritise over the next few years."

The Commissioner is preparing to launch his Police and Crime Plan, setting out a new strategic direction for Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner, including an overarching plan of making the county the safest in England and Wales.

Feedback from the survey will help shape the plan.

David Sidwick said: “The survey will look at my own priorities, which will form the basis for the plan, and ask what you think about them – do you agree with them and do they align with your own values?”

“Remember, this plan is your plan. Therefore, it’s crucial that we get your thoughts and opinions to make sure local policing remains dynamic and responsive to the communities it serves."

If the above link doesn't work, try this one, or please cut and paste https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/PCPDA into your web browser.

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

September 8, 2021

Warning To E-Scooter Riders After Four-Year-Old Boy is Injured In Collision In Bournemouth

Dorset Police is urging e-scooter riders to be aware of pedestrians and other road users after a four-year-old boy was injured in a collision along Bournemouth seafront.

At around 1pm on Friday 3 September 2021 Dorset Police was made aware that a collision had occurred on the promenade near to Boscombe Pier during the second day of the Bournemouth Air Festival.

The boy, from Christchurch, was taken to Poole Hospital for treatment to a suspected fractured collarbone. Officers have spoken to the e-scooter rider, a man aged in his 30s and from Lancashire, and interviewed him on suspicion of driving offences under The Road Traffic Act. An investigation into the collision is underway.

The e-scooter involved was hired through Beryl as part of a trial currently operating in Bournemouth and Poole, which allows individuals to hire an e-scooter from an official Government scheme and ride legally. These scooters have a reduced speed limit.

Privately owned e-scooters are currently illegal to use in public places such as pavements, cycle lanes, beach promenades or any publicly accessible land, such as parks.

The illegal use of e-scooters remains an important element of Dorset Police’s Operation Relentless anti-social behaviour priority and this summer the Force has carried out two days of action. Individuals were asked to sign an agreement that they will stop using their e-scooter illegally on public roads.

In total since the beginning of the year, more than 40 riders of privately owned e-scooters have been stopped and spoken to before being issued with warnings. Officers also have the power to seize e-scooters that are either found to be used illegally or involved in criminal activity.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Unfortunately on Saturday 4th September we had 3 bikes stolen from Two Riversmeet Leisure Centre in the day time. Please use a D-Lock when securing your bike as this is the best way to stop your bike from being stolen. If you have any information about this please contact 101, thank you! #5331 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice #dorsetpolice

Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

September 4, 2021

Bespoke Free Webinars For Older Drivers In Dorset

In addition to the national Project Edwards webinars for older drivers, Dorset Police are offering free webinars to Dorset residents.

The courses focus on issues unique to driving on Dorset roads and are designed to help the mature motorist to continue driving safely for longer.

The courses are free, but spaces are limited to 50 per event and residents are encouraged to register to ensure a place is reserved on the course.

We are holding three webinars in September:

• Wednesday 15 September - 2pm
• Thursday 16 September - 2pm
• Friday 17 September - 2pm

For more information, click on the following link:
https://www.dorsetroadsafe.org.uk/education-coursestraining/older-drivers/

To register on one of the courses, click on the following link:
https://attendee.gototraining.com/rt/1729829075903177217

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

September 3, 2021

Christchurch Police Giving Anti Scam Talks

Today one of our Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Officers attended Riverland Court on Stour Road for a crime prevention talk regarding scams. Throughout lock down we have seen a raise in these types of crimes. Please report any suspicious phone calls, emails and letters to www.ActionFraud.police.uk or 101.
#5331 #christchurchpolice #dorsetpolice #ActionFraud

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Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

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Your Voice Matters Survey

Dear Resident,

This is the last chance for you to feed into our NPT priorities survey. It will be running for a couple more weeks.

Our Priorities are set every 6 months, with a review and update every quarter.
You can view the current priorities on our webpages: Click Here


If you want to feed into the new priorities, to be launched soon, you can do so by following the link: Click Here


Thank you Email tracking gif

Message Sent By
Dom Smith (Dorset Police, NEO 5390, Bournemouth & Christchurch NEO)

August 28, 2021

Help To Keep Yourself and Others Safe Over The Bank Holiday Weekend

Dorset Police is reminding the public to how to keep themselves and others safe over the August bank holiday weekend.

Many thousands of people are expected to visit Dorset over the coming weeks to enjoy the late August bank holiday weekend and attend big events, such as the Bournemouth 7s rugby event, Quayside music festival in Weymouth and Bournemouth Air Festival.

The Force’s summer policing operation was launched in May and aims to keep visitors and residents safe during the summer by carrying out high-visibility patrols and introducing measures to prevent crime occurring in the first place.

Working alongside partner agencies, the operation focusses on some key crime types and issues that traditionally rise over the summer months.

A series of targeted campaigns have been launched including Operation Relentless, which aims to drive down anti-social behaviour (ASB) through high-visibility patrols in known hotspot locations across the county.

Other campaigns include the ‘Don’t regret your night out’ violent crime campaign, which reinforces the dangers of mixing alcohol and violence and the consequences for those who do. Operation Vigilant will see plain clothed and uniform officers patrolling Bournemouth town centre to identify individuals who may be displaying signs of unacceptable behaviour, such as sexual harassment, inappropriate touching and loitering.

Other initiatives are underway to target drink and drug driving, child sexual exploitation and county lines drug dealing.

Dorset Police’s Summer Policing Gold Commander Chief Superintendent Mark Callaghan said: “To date this summer has been very busy and we are continuing to work closely with our partner agencies to help keep people safe.

“Over the coming weeks we have some key events taking place and I am reminding people to make sure they look out for themselves and each other. Representatives from Dorset Police, BCP Council and Dorset Council, as well as the RNLI and fire service are all out there along our beaches and in our communities and can be approached by anyone who needs help or is worried about someone else.

“Our Force, as well as other emergency service colleagues, have already experienced high levels of demand this year with more people choosing to enjoy staycations in Dorset. We continue to ask visitors and residents to help us by using our online channels when reporting a non-emergency, rather than calling 101. Whichever way you contact us, your enquiry will be dealt with by a member of staff.”

Online options include making an enquiry online, requesting a call back or using the Report Crime Online function at dorset.police.uk. You can also email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk. In an emergency always dial 999.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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E-Scooters Seized As Part of Operation To Tackle Their Illegal and Unsafe Use

Dorset Police has seized 25 e-scooters for being ridden on public land or having been involved in suspected criminal activity.

The illegal use of e-scooters remains an important element of our Operation Relentless anti-social behaviour priority and this summer the Force has carried out two days of action.

Individuals were asked to sign an agreement that they will stop using their e-scooter illegally on public roads. In total since the beginning of the year, over 40 riders of privately owned e-scooters have been stopped and spoken to before being issued with warnings.

Officers also have the power to seize e-scooters that are either found to be used illegally or involved in criminal activity. Over the course of the summer, 14 have been taken away from riders for being used in criminality, with a further 11 e-scooters having been seized for having no insurance.

View full article here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13127

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Dorset Police Committed To Protecting Children and The Vulnerable According To Hmicfrs Report

Dorset Police is committed to protecting children and those vulnerable young people in our communities according to a new report published by the HMICFRS on Thursday 26 August 2021.

Dorset Police was inspected by the HMICFRS in April of this year to determine the Force’s effectiveness in its interaction with children and young people.

This included when children become involved in the criminal justice process, are admitted to custody or involved in wider police investigations linked to child protection and safety.

The inspection found that Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner are committed to protecting children and those most vulnerable young people in our communities.

It also praised the Force as effective in its professional relationships with partners and in its contributions to multi-agency working and safeguarding. In addition, it acknowledged the good work from officers responding to incidents involving children and those working in child protection investigations.

The report identified the following examples of successful service delivery:

Dorset Police’s child-centred policing strategy
The availability of 24/7 real-time intelligence researchers in the Force’s control room
Swift information exchange processes with children’s social care services and other safeguarding partners in the Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH)
Good quality investigations from specialist child protection teams
A good understanding of those children most at risk from child exploitation.


A number of recommendations were also made to the Force where developments should be made to improve service delivery and ensuring effective safeguarding procedures.

This included reports of children missing from home or care, longer-term problem-solving related to children and young people, working to improve prioritisation of online investigations and ensuring appropriate adults attend children when in custody as soon as possible.

Dorset Police Chief Constable Scott Chilton said: “We welcome the report and are pleased with the good practices highlighted. Dorset Police has worked hard with partners to ensure investigations and processes are in place to protect children and young people in all of our communities.

“Collaboration is required to do this effectively and we have built and commit to develop strong relationships with safeguarding partners.

“We also welcome the recommendations for improvements, of which we will fully take on board and are already putting strategies and training in place to ensure progress is made.

“I take very seriously any recommendations to further protect vulnerable children and have immediately put in place measures to address these recommendations.

“We will continue to work closely with our staff and partners to ensure we effectively address these areas and are able to deliver the highest possible service of care to the children and young people of Dorset.”

Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset David Sidwick said: “I welcome the report and although it preceded the start of my term of office as Police and Crime Commissioner, I am thankful to HMICFRS for recognising the challenges in this area of work.

“My office is working closely with Dorset Police leadership to ensure efforts to address the areas for improvement highlighted are done so swiftly, and I look forward to both seeing the Force response in the coming weeks and welcoming back HMIC in six months for them to review the same.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 26, 2021

Cctv Appeal Following Thefts from Shop In Bournemouth

Officers are issuing a CCTV image of a man they would like to speak to following reports of thefts from a shop in Bournemouth.

At around 6.35pm on Saturday 3 July 2021 a man entered Next at Castlepoint Shopping Centre and stole an ornament, before immediately leaving the store.

The same man is believed to have stolen items from Next at Castlepoint Shopping Centre on six different occasions between Wednesday 14 April 2021 and Saturday 22 May 2021.

The total value of items stolen is over £300.

Police Constable Clifford Ryan, of Dorset Police, said: “We have been carrying out numerous enquiries to try and identify the man who repeatedly stole items from the shop.

“As part of my enquiries, I am now in a position to issue a CCTV image of a man I would like to speak to. I would ask anyone who recognises him to please get in touch.”

View image here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13107

Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210107156. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Successful First Deployment of Operation Vigilant In Bournemouth

Officers from Dorset Police have taken part in the first deployment of their Operation Vigilant scheme in Bournemouth.

The operation ran in central Bournemouth on the evening of Saturday 21 August 2021. Operation Vigilant uses both plain clothes and uniformed officers working together to spot and intervene in instances of aggressive, predatory and intrusive sexual behaviour.

Through a variety of police powers, such as dispersal orders to make offenders leave the area, up to and including arrest, the operation aims to safeguard people who are at risk of assault or unwanted intrusion.

Officers on the ground reported that they were encouraged by not seeing too much behaviour of concern or large numbers of vulnerable people. However, officers did identify individuals causing a risk to several women on the night. A dispersal order was issued to one man who was approaching vulnerable women and girls on their own, and to another who was exhibiting unprovoked aggressive behaviour.

In a separate incident, staff at one venue called for police assistance and one man was arrested for inappropriate touching. Officers were assisted by venue staff on this occasion.

Neighbourhood Sergeant Mark Philpotts said: “Officers engaged with bars and nightclubs during the evening and this was a key element in raising awareness and highlighting suspicious individuals throughout the night. Dorset Police will be looking at continuing Operation Vigilant throughout coming weeks, enforcing the message that we will not tolerate violence against women and girls. Everyone has the right to enjoy themselves on a night out and officers will act when any vulnerable person is being put in fear or experiencing unwanted intrusion.”

Across the course of the evening, officers spoke with several people out on their own who were vulnerable. Officers had positive feedback from them as they were happy that the police were watching out for their welfare and reducing the risk to others in the night time environment. Two people were taken to the Safe Bus for water and to wait for taxis.

The Safe Bus is a partnership initiative between Dorset Police, South West Ambulance Services and BCP Council.

Sergeant Philpotts said: “The Safe Bus is a brilliant resource to have access to. With a collaborative approach from medical staff, police volunteers and security officers, it offers a safe place for vulnerable individuals in the night time leisure environment.”

At the beginning of the evening four licensed premises were given kits to test for drink spiking, along with posters to show the venue is aware of the issues and supports the operation. Dorset Police’s licensing team will engage with all venues to broaden the knowledge and understanding of drink spiking and the programme will continue in the central area of Bournemouth.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 21, 2021

Force Continues To Enhance Understanding and Its Response To Domestic Abuse

Dorset Police officers and staff have enhanced their understanding of some of the tactics used by domestic abuse perpetrators as part of the Force’s continued efforts to strengthen the service they provide to victims.

SafeLives, a UK-wide charity dedicated to ending domestic abuse, has worked closely with Dorset Police to help it understand its strengths and areas for continued improvement. As a result, the Force introduced the Domestic Abuse Matters training programme in April 2021.

The training is being delivered to over 750 officers and frontline staff.

View full article here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13086

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Making Dorset A Hostile Place For Criminals A Focus For New Chief Constable



Making Dorset a hostile place for criminals and offenders is one of the aims of Dorset’s new Chief Constable Scott Chilton.

Chief Constable Chilton began his role this week following the retirement of former Chief Constable James Vaughan.

He takes the reins having been Deputy Chief Constable for the Force since October 2020.

Chief Constable Chilton said: “I want to make Dorset as hostile a place as possible for any offender or criminal so our communities are safe and feel safe.

“Dorset remains an area of low crime, which continues to fall, but I want to ensure we are targeting those who wish to cause harm in our communities, while working with partners to solve problems and enhance the life of our residents as a result.”

Chief Constable Chilton, aged 48, grew up in West Yorkshire and first joined Hampshire Police in 1992 as a constable in Portsmouth.

His career includes working as part of international policing in Afghanistan between 2009 and 2011 as well as working on police reform across Europe.

Closer to home, he has worked across special branch, counter terrorism, police operations and public contact and strategic partnerships for Hampshire Police.

He rose to the rank of Assistant Chief Constable for Hampshire covering crime, criminal justice and intelligence before joining Dorset Police last year.

Chief Constable Chilton added: “We have a recently elected Police and Crime Commissioner in David Sidwick and he will soon be publishing his police and crime plan.

“This will drive our own priorities going forward, which will focus on collaboration and working closely with our partners and communities.

“Policing cannot operate in isolation, so those partnership links will be critical to managing demand and community confidence.

“Maintaining visibility and listening to our communities are also priorities for me and my teams to ensure we are engaging and making a difference to all of our force area.

“Dorset Police wants to make all of our communities safer, but that requires outstanding people. I take the role of chief constable with a team that has performed incredibly well in the last 18 months in often difficult circumstances and facing very high levels of demand.

“I know I am incredibly proud to become chief constable of a force that has some exceptional community resilience and strong partnership links. We must now focus on how we can make a difference to our rural, urban and coastal communities.

“Our communities should expect and deserve to be safe and feel safe and it is my commitment to ensure Dorset, Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole receive a first-class policing service.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Pilot Operation Launched In Bournemouth To Protect The Public and Prevent Sexual Offending

Dorset Police is launching a pilot operation in a bid to prevent sexual offences from taking place within Bournemouth town centre now that lockdown has lifted and there are more people enjoying the area's bars and clubs.

Using a combination of uniformed and plain-clothed officers, Operation Vigilant patrols will be carried out to identify individuals who may be displaying signs of unacceptable behaviour, such as sexual harassment, inappropriate touching and loitering. Plain clothed officers will call in a uniformed intervention team when such behaviours are observed.

The intervention team will then consider their powers of arrest, dispersal powers or search powers depending on the circumstances observed.

The operation will be carried out on a frequent basis and supports the national agenda for pro-actively preventing violence against women and girls. However, any sexually motivated assault or behaviour identified by officers will be investigated, regardless of who is involved or their gender.

The pilot will run for three months in Bournemouth town centre and, following evaluation, may be expanded to other parts of the county. It follows a successful similar operation carried out in Oxford town centre by Thames Valley Police.

Read full article here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/12978


Anyone who has been the victim of a sexual assault, whether recently or in the past, is encouraged to contact Dorset Police online from www.dorset.police.uk/do-it-online or by telephone to 101. In an emergency always call 999. Not everyone will wish to involve the police at first, but if that is the case please use the services provided anonymously by The Shores at 0800 970 9954 or www.the-shores.org.uk.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 19, 2021

Update Following Reported Dog Bite Incident In Bournemouth

A man has come forward following an image appeal in relation to a reported dog bite incident in Bournemouth.

At around 4.15pm on Tuesday 10 August 2021 a woman aged in her 50s was walking her elderly dog in a field at Hengistbury Head when a man with two Spaniel-type dogs walked past her.

Initially the dogs were on a lead but when he let them off they ran back toward the woman’s dog and were allegedly aggressive toward it. It is reported that the woman went to intervene and was bitten on the hand, causing a puncture wound.

Following an image appeal, a man has come forward and is assisting officers with their investigation. No arrests have been made.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Last week two of our local Neighbourhood Policing Officers attended an address in Christchurch where an elderly male had fallen off the kerb and was lying face down on the road. An ambulance had been called but took over an hour and a half to arrive. The male was 94 years old and had a head injury. Officers were in the area and attended to give first aid and have a defib ready just in case. Great to hear that the male is doing well and on the mend!

It's so important to learn first aid and keep first aid supplies up to date. This is especially true with the high demand the Ambulance Service are facing at the moment. You never know when you might need it! #5331 #6093 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice #firstaid

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Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)
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Neighbourhood Watch Launch Impact Report 2021

Following the success of last year’s first-ever Neighbourhood Watch Impact Report, we are delighted to share this year’s Impact Report for 2020/21.

This report builds on last year with data and case studies demonstrating the continued hard work and dedication, and impact of our 90,000 volunteers and 2.3 million household members.

The report demonstrates how we are achieving each of our three ambitions within our 5-year strategy, which we embarked upon last year, namely being:

the authoritative voice on community-based crime prevention
the most popular gateway for citizens to engage in their locality
a recognised contributor to community health and wellbeing.

In addition to preventing crime and the fear of crime, we have made a significant impact in supporting communities, especially through the Covid-19 challenges.

As many charities have experienced, we have adapted the way we work and learned new ways to improve our services to serve our communities better. Whilst the restrictions have been relaxed over the Summer, we know we are not yet through these difficult times, and our role within communities is still just as much in demand as it was at the start of the pandemic.

None of the work we do would have been possible without people like you who support the work we do and the values we stand for. We want to thank you for your ongoing, unwavering support.

Visit ourwatch.org.uk/impact to download the report.

Let’s stay connected!
John Hayward-Cripps, CEO Neighbourhood Watch Network

Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349

Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)

August 16, 2021

Help Us Reduce Our Emergency Calls This Summer

Over the summer months, the number of 999 Emergency calls received by Dorset Police increases. Already this summer the force has seen a significant increase – in July we received 12,480 calls to 999 Emergency, this is a 7% increase compared with the same time last year.

On average a 999 Emergency call takes around 7 minutes to resolve. Before ending the call, the contact centre always makes sure the caller is safe and help has been arranged.

Each day we also receive calls to 999 Emergency which are for non-emergency reasons. These can be to ask questions, report non-emergency issues and even hoax calls. Answering these calls prevents us helping someone in a real emergency.

Genuine 999 calls are assessed to make sure that we are prioritising all our incidents. Within the Force Command Centre, we are constantly reviewing and balancing our response to 999 demand, to determine whether some 999 calls are in fact not emergencies and to make sure we are responding to calls with the highest emergency need first.

As part of this year’s summer contacting the police campaign, we are reminding our communities about when they should contact the police in an emergency and what to do if they dial 999 by mistake.

When to call 999 Emergency

It is important everyone understands when to call 999 Emergency.

Only dial 999 Emergency if:

Life is at threatened
People are injured
Offenders are nearby
Immediate action is required to save lives, stop injury, or catch criminals.


If you need to speak to the police for any other reasons, please use one of our online non-emergency contact channels or call 101.

What to do if you call 999 by mistake?

Unfortunately, we also receive calls to 999 Emergency which have been made by mistake.
These calls often happen by accident when a child is playing with a smartphone or when an unlocked phone is in a pocket or bag.

If you do dial 999 Emergency by mistake – don’t hang up, please speak to the operator, and tell them you are safe before ending the call.

We log every call, so if you hang up, we must then call you back to make sure you are safe which takes additional time and may prevent us from responding to other 999 calls.

To support the campaign, we have designed a poster to help people understand when to call 999 Emergency. We would be grateful if you could support the campaign by printing the poster and displaying it in your local communities.

We also have other resources available around the different non-emergency ways to contact the police, if you would like any of these please visit the resources page on our website.

If you require a large quantity of printed posters, please email: engagementandbrandcommuications@devonandcorwnall.pnn.police.uk

Thank you for your support.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Dorset Police Chief Constable To Retire After 30-Year CareerDorset Police Chief Constable To Retire After 30-Year Career

Dorset Police Chief Constable James Vaughan QPM is to retire from his role after 30 years in policing.

Chief Constable Vaughan will leave the job at the end of this week, Friday 13 August 2021, after a long and distinguished career of public service.

Chief Constable Vaughan began his policing career as a beat constable in his home town of Chippenham, Wiltshire, in 1991. He has worked across Wiltshire Police, Dorset Police and Devon & Cornwall Police.

His career has included various uniform and detective roles with major and serious organised crime, citizen focused policing and as a crime commander.

The last decade has seen him in the roles of assistant chief constable, deputy chief constable and chief constable with Dorset Police. He was also joint deputy chief constable across Dorset and Devon & Cornwall Police from 2017 to 2018.

During the last 10 years he has also been involved in and latterly led the National Forensics Capability Programme to improve and evolve forensics in policing across the country.

Chief Constable James Vaughan said: “I have been hugely privileged to have been involved in policing as a senior leader for many years and I leave Dorset Police as a force that is performing well and has some amazing officers and staff.

“One of the things I will miss most is the incredible police family we have in Dorset. I will leave behind some close colleagues, friends and many officers and staff I have worked with over the years.

“Policing has been my life for the past 30 years and it has been a whirlwind. Policing has many ups and downs, but that day-to-day adrenaline you feel as a police officer will be unforgettable.”

Chief Constable James Vaughan leaves policing after the COVID-19 pandemic of the last 17 months, throughout which time he has led on the Dorset partnership response to the pandemic.

Chief Constable Vaughan added: “We have all faced enormous professional and personal challenges throughout the pandemic, but I never fail to be impressed and incredibly proud of how Dorset Police’s officers and staff step up and do the right thing to protect the communities of Dorset.

“I will cherish many high points and reflect on numerous lows in my career. An undoubted high point of my career was receiving the Queen’s Police Medal from HRH The Prince of Wales in 2019.

“Lows would be the loss of colleagues and friends working within the Force.

“The last year has proved to me that Dorset’s communities are strong, caring and compassionate and I am proud to call it my home.”

Chief Constable Vaughan will continue to lead the National Forensics Capability Network until later this autumn, before taking a well-earned retirement.

He said: “I am looking forward greatly to spending more time with my family and taking the opportunity to indulge in my hobbies and interests.

“I have a twin son and daughter taking their GCSEs in the coming year and have a passion for sailing – so I’ve no doubt home life will be a focus for the immediate future.

“I will be looking to use some of the skills and incredible experiences I have had in policing as and when opportunities arise, as well as continuing with volunteering organisations I’m involved with and my school governor duties.”

Chief Constable James Vaughan will step back from his role on Friday 13 August 2021, with current Dorset Police Deputy Chief Constable Scott Chilton taking the chief constable reins from Monday 16 August 2021.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 12, 2021

Public Appeal In Search For Missing Bournemouth Teenager

Officers searching for a missing teenage girl from Bournemouth are appealing for information from the public to help find her.

Tazmin Thomas, aged 17, was last seen at an address in the town on Wednesday 4 August 2021.

She is described as white, around five feet five inches tall and of slim build with mousey brown straight hair with highlights. She was last seen wearing a light blue denim jacket, light blue ripped skinny jeans and black trainers and was carrying a black Adidas bag with white stripes, a bag for life and a bunch of flowers.

View image here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13023

Inspector Greg Tansill, of Bournemouth police, said: “While we have no information to suggest Tazmin has come to any harm, she has not been seen for a number of days now and we are keen to locate her to check that she is safe and well.

“I would urge anyone who has information as to her whereabouts, or who sees a teenage girl matching the description given, to please contact us immediately.

“I would also like to make a direct plea to Tazmin if you see this – please contact us and let us know where you are as we just want to ensure you are all right.”

Anyone with information or knowledge as to Tazmin’s whereabouts is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210125734.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Image Appeal Following Hate Crime Incident In Christchurch

Officers investigating a hate crime incident in Christchurch are issuing an image of a man they would like to speak to.

At around 4pm on Sunday 18 July 2021 the victim – a woman aged in her 40s – was swimming in the sea at Mudeford, close to the beach huts on the spit, when she challenged a group of people who were reported to be riding jet skis dangerously close to people.

A man from the group responded by being verbally abusive toward the woman, including making homophobic comments, and splashed water at her.

Police Constable Erica Weldon, of Dorset Police, said: “Dorset Police takes hate crime very seriously and we have been carrying out a number of enquiries into this incident.

“I am now in a position to release an image of a man we would like to speak to.

View image here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/13024

“I would urge anyone who recognises him to please come forward. I am also keen to hear from any witnesses to the incident who have not already spoken to police.”

Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210114827. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)
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Reminder To Keep An Eye on Your Belongings While Enjoying The Beach In Dorset

Dorset Police is reminding residents and visitors to keep an eye on their belongings while enjoying the county’s beaches to avoid becoming a victim of theft.

With a good weekend of warm weather on its way, officers are keen to ensure people don’t fall victim to theft and are issuing some crime prevention advice:

• If you don’t need it, leave it at home. Only take possessions you really need to the beach.

• Consider one of your group staying with your personal possessions when going into the sea or the shops/toilet.

• You can buy waterproof bags and pouches to store mobile phones, wallets and car keys while you are in the water.

Inspector Darren Harris said: “It is fantastic to see so many people visiting Dorset’s beaches this summer after a long and difficult year. One of the main aims of our summer policing operation is to prevent crimes from occurring in the first place and therefore reduce the chance of becoming a victim of crime.

“While we have not experienced a rise in theft offences along our beaches, we are asking residents and visitors to follow these simple steps to make life very difficult for thieves.

“Our officers and police community support officers will continue their proactive patrols this summer, supported by Community Safety Accreditation Scheme (CSAS) officers, council staff and the RNLI.”

You can find out more tips and advice by visiting: www.dorset.police.uk/help-advice-crime-prevention/home-property/. If you see a theft in progress, please dial 999 or approach an officer or member of council/RNLI staff.


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 11, 2021

Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Really busy shift for Christchurch Officers today. A mixture of jobs such as missing people, siezing a cannabis grinder and foot chase for three male's causing criminal damage. A good days work! #5331 #5699 #OnTheBeatDorset

Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)
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Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Today we attended an area on Matchams Lane following a report of criminal damage to a fence. If anyone witnesses scrambler bikes in this area or anything suspicious please report via 101. This is now an area we have added to our rural crime patrols. #5331 #7161 #6093 #OnTheBeatDorset
#christchurchdorset #ruralcrimeteam

Attachments:
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Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)
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New Fund To Tackle Anti-Social Behaviour In Dorset

The Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset is delighted to launch a dedicated fund to help tackle Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB).

The Op Relentless Community Fund, has been set up to help community groups and charities in Dorset take action and tackle ASB in their local area.

The new grant is open to organisations that want to put in place projects and initiatives that reduce ASB and increase public feeling of safety in areas disproportionately affected by ASB.

Applications from £100 up to £5,000 are welcomed, the projects must address ASB and have a local focus.

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick, said: “This is me making good on my promise to take action and help all of those people who have told me that they want to do something about anti-social behaviour in their community. Its time to make a real, long lasting difference to our communities and work together to make our county the safest in England and Wales.

“I want to enable and empower our communities to help in the fight against anti-social behaviour and the Op Relentless Community Fund is a very direct way of doing just that.”

For more information, including a list of the criteria, or to make an application, please go here.

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

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Dorset Residents Reminded To Have Say on Policing

Dorset residents are being reminded that they have a chance to give their views on crime and policing in the county.

Members of the public are being asked to complete the survey which was launched last month by Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick.

Go here to complete the survey online.

The survey is being launched as the Commissioner prepares his Police and Crime Plan, setting out a new strategic direction for Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner.

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “This is your chance to tell me and Dorset Police what you want us to prioritise over the next few years.

“It will look at priorities derived from three years of campaigning and talking to the people of Dorset, which will form the basis for the plan, and now we need to check what you think about them – do you agree with them and do they align with your own values?”

Feedback from the survey will help shape the Police and Crime Plan, which will be in place by the autumn.


Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

August 8, 2021

Alert - Vaccine Passport Scams

Action Fraud has received over 700 reports from members of the public about fake emails purporting to be from the NHS.


The emails claim to be able to provide people with a “digital passport” that “proves you have been vaccinated against COVID-19”. These emails are fake, and the links within them lead to genuine-looking websites that steal your personal and financial information.

How to protect yourself:

In the UK, coronavirus vaccines will only be available via the National Health Services of England, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland. You can be contacted by the NHS, your employer, a GP surgery or pharmacy local to you, to receive your vaccine. Remember, the vaccine is free of charge. At no point will you be asked to pay.

The NHS will never ask you for your bank account or card details.
The NHS will never ask you for your PIN or banking passwords.
The NHS will never arrive unannounced at your home to administer the vaccine.
The NHS will never ask you to prove your identity by sending copies of personal documents such as your passport, driving licence, bills or pay slips.
Your vaccination status can be obtained for free through the official NHS app, NHS website, or by calling the NHS on 119.


How to report scams:

If you receive a call you believe to be fraudulent, hang up. If you are suspicious about an email you have received, you can report it by forwarding the email to: report@phishing.gov.uk. Suspicious text messages can also be reported by forwarding them to the number: 7726 (it’s free of charge).

If you believe you are the victim of a fraud, please report this to Action Fraud as soon as possible by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.


Message Sent By:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

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County Lines - No Hiding Place In Dorset

In May, just after I became the Police and Crime Commissioner, we started how I wish us to continue, with Dorset Police carrying out a week of intense activity designed to target and disrupt those involved in County Lines. County Lines is a term used to describe gangs and organised criminal networks involved in exporting illegal drugs into one or more importing areas within the UK, using dedicated mobile phone lines or other form of ‘deal line’.

14 people were arrested, more than £40,000 worth of drugs and £7,100 in cash was seized from suspected dealers. Officers also seized approximately 146 grams of suspected crack cocaine and 90 grams of suspected heroin with an estimated value of £23,600. Stolen bikes valued at £12,000 were also recovered. This was definitely a good result.

The Force also carried out welfare checks in order to protect vulnerable people who become snared into the work of these criminal gangs. The gangs are likely to exploit children and vulnerable adults to move and store the drugs and money and they will often use coercion, intimidation, violence (including sexual violence) and weapons.

I not only want to praise the hard work of the officers and staff involved in the week of activity, which saw such success, I’d also like to reassure residents that countering the threat posed to our communities by county lines gangs is an ongoing effort and one that is reflected in my Police and Crime Plan for Dorset.

There are two priorities in my plan, which will focus the work of the Force in this area, the first is to Fight Violent Crime and High Harm and the second, is to put Victims and Communities First. These priorities have been formed during the three years I spent talking with the people of Dorset about what matters to them, whilst campaigning to become PCC. I know how concerned residents are about the effects of drug misuse in our society and I know too that they want to see a difference in Dorset, with more enforcement, more arrests and more help for those who through no fault of their own become involved in County Lines gangs and I intend to deliver on those priorities.

I am intent on working very closely with Dorset Police, as well as a wide range of partners including both our local authorities, to make sure these gangs find it as difficult as possible to operate anywhere in our county. I want them to understand that Dorset is not a good place to ply their toxic trade.

If you would like to take part in my Police and Crime Plan Survey and tell me what you want us to prioritise over the next few years, please do take a couple of minutes and complete the survey at www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/PCPDA

If you think someone is being exploited by county lines gangs, call police on 101 or the free and anonymous Crimestoppers line on 0800 555 111.

Further information on county lines can be found at dorset.police.uk/countylines

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

August 4, 2021

Warning To Public Following Series of Rolex Robberies In Dorset

Officers investigating a series of robberies where Rolex watches have been stolen from victims’ wrists in Dorset are renewing their plea for members of the public to remain vigilant.

A number of incidents have been reported in recent days, including a robbery in Baiter Park in Poole on Monday 26 July 2021, an incident in Poundbury on Saturday 17 July 2021 and two further robberies in East Dorset on Wednesday 14 July 2021 and Thursday 15 July 2021.

Detective Sergeant Karen Penn, of Dorset Police's Priority Crime Team, said: “Each of these incidents is subject to a full investigation and we are doing everything we can to identify those involved. We are working with other forces who have experienced similar incidents and sharing intelligence as part of our ongoing enquiries.
“We would like to renew our plea for members of the public to remain vigilant, particularly if they are wearing expensive watches or items of jewellery. The victims in these cases are generally men aged around 70 or older and we would urge members of the public to talk to any elderly relatives who could be targeted by this kind of offending to make them aware of these incidents.

“The offenders, who are described in most cases as Eastern European women and speaking in broken English, often pose as people working for a charity and we would remind the public that a genuine charity worker should have no issue with showing their identification if required to do so.
“We would continue to urge anyone who has been a victim of an offence of this nature to report it to police and we would also like to hear from anyone who has come across expensive watches such as Rolexes being offered for sale in suspicious circumstances.”


Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210086480. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.

Message Sent By:
Linzi Berryman (Police, Alert Officer, Communications and Engagement)

August 3, 2021

Force Pledges Ongoing Commitment To Its Communities

Dorset Police has once again renewed its commitment to engaging and communicating with its communities to ensure a local approach to policing.

The Force has renewed local plans under the Neighbourhood Engagement Commitment (NEC) initiative so communities can communicate as effectively as possible with their local police.

These plans will be published on www.dorset.police.uk over the coming weeks on the relevant neighbourhood policing pages.

The NEC establishes minimum standards and common objectives that each neighbourhood policing team aims to achieve within their policing area.

Views and perceptions of crime are impacted by personal experiences and concerns within their local area. These NECs will ensure communities receive a local level response to crime, which is representative and meaningful.

The commitment, and the neighbourhood plans that flow from it, aims to outline how local policing teams will engage with their community through meetings, partnerships and social media feeds, as well as linking in with partner agencies to share best practice and good ideas.

The plans cover all areas of Dorset and have been developed by the respective local policing area commanders.

Chief Constable James Vaughan said: “Neighbourhood policing is at the heart of everything we do and building trust and confidence with our local communities is vital in helping us to prevent crime, keep people safe, especially the most vulnerable members of our communities, and bring offenders to justice.

“These plans will ensure our service is delivered at a local level where partners and communities can see and feel an outstanding service.

“It is vital that our communities have a voice, especially after one of the most difficult years in recent times. The way in which we engage with our communities changed dramatically overnight due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, our face-to-face engagement was affected by the pandemic, but we have worked hard to find alternative ways to remain connected with the public, such as virtual calls and greater use of social media and Dorset Alert.”

David Sidwick, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “The return of community focused policing to the streets of Dorset is one of my main priorities and will be key to the police and crime plan I am now developing.

“I believe it’s vital that people should know who their local officers are and should be able to communicate with them, and residents have told me this is a concern they share.

“I therefore welcome this important pledge from Dorset Police, and I look forward to working closely with the Force over the coming months and years to build on the Neighbourhood Engagement Commitment and ensure our officers are as close as possible to the people they represent.”

To view the neighbourhood engagement plans, please visit: www.dorset.police.uk/NPT

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

August 2, 2021

Crime Prevention Advice Issued Following Rise In Theft of Catalytic Converters In Dorset

Dear Resident,

It is now the time of year for the Neighbourhood Policing Team Priority Surveys to begin running, to help feed into the new priorities we will launch after the summer.

Our Priorities are set every 6 months, with a review and update every quarter.
You can view the current priorities on our webpages: Click Here

You may have already taken part in our survey at the start of the year. This helped us set the priorities we are currently working towards at the moment.

If you want to feed into the new priorities, to be launched after the summer, you can do so by following the link: Click Here

Thank you


Message Sent By:
Dom Smith (Dorset Police, NEO 5390, Bournemouth & Christchurch NEO)

July 31, 2021

Crime Prevention Advice Issued Following Rise In Theft of Catalytic Converters In Dorset

The Force is issuing crime prevention advice to motorists following an increase in catalytic converter thefts over the last year due to the rising value of the precious metals they contain.

Dorset Police data reveals there were 94 reports of catalytic converters stolen from vehicles in the county between January and June 2020. This increased by 368 per cent – 440 reports – during the same period in 2021. These thefts can have a real impact on victims. It is not only an inconvenience, but also disrupts day-to-day tasks, such as taking children to school and getting to and from work.

Catalytic converter thefts can also leave victims with pricey repair bills, increased premiums or even having their vehicles written off.

Superintendent Heather Dixey said: “Our officers are working hard to prevent this crime. A number of vehicles being used to commit these offences have been seized recently and our crime scene investigators are working hard to forensically link offenders to these vehicles and the crimes.

“Dorset Police acknowledges that this is a concern for our communities and we are doing everything we can to prevent it, but this crime can happen in a matter of seconds. We are asking for your help. We can’t stop this crime without you, so if you know something please help your community and contact us.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “The theft of a catalytic converter can have a huge impact if, like many of us, you rely on your vehicle. I’d like to reassure people that a huge amount of work is being done between the police and partner agencies to crack down on this crime, but people need to be aware that it is a growing problem.

“Please, be aware of the police advice to motorists about what you can do to reduce the chance of becoming a victim. And if you do see anything suspicious, make sure you report it immediately.”

There are ways you can protect your catalytic converter from thieves.

Think about where you park - If you can, park your vehicle in a locked garage. If this isn’t an option, then park it in a well-lit and well-populated area.

Park close to fences, walls or a kerb and avoid parking your vehicle half on the pavement and half on the road, as this may make it easier for thieves to access the catalytic converter.

If you are parking in a public car park, consider parking alongside other vehicles. This will make it harder for thieves to get close enough to get underneath the vehicle.

Mark your catalytic converter - You can mark your catalytic converter with a unique code that will relate back to your vehicle. This is done using SmartWater and is an incredibly effective way of preventing theft. SmartWater is a forensic liquid, which can withstand heat of up to 600 degrees. It can be applied to car parts and each batch has a unique code which allows it to be traced back to the owner.

You can report any information to us online at dorset.police.uk/do-it-online.
Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.



Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 29, 2021

High Value Watch Thefts

There have been a series of reports of Rolex watches being targeted in robberies, with incidents reported including robberies at the Ferndown Golf Club on Wednesday 14 July 2021, in High Street, Wimborne on Thursday 15 July 2021 and in Stanley Road, Highcliffe on Saturday 17 July 2021.

The victim in Highcliffe, a man aged in his 70s, was returning to his car in a car park at around 12.45pm on Saturday 17 July 2021 when he was approached by a woman, who took a Rolex watch from his left wrist. The incident left the victim with bruising to his left hand.

Police Constable Jim Perks, of Christchurch police, said: “This watch was of sentimental value to the victim as well as being expensive and we are carrying out a number of enquiries to try and identify the woman responsible for this robbery.

“We have had a number of incidents of a similar nature in recent days and I would again remind people to be vigilant and be particularly careful if you are wearing any high value watches or jewellery and are approached in suspicious circumstances.”

Anyone with information is asked to contact Dorset Police at www.dorset.police.uk, via email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or by calling 101, quoting occurrence number 55210114276. Alternatively, to stay 100 per cent anonymous, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers online at Crimestoppers-uk.org or call Freephone 0800 555 111.



Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 28, 2021

Public Reminded Where To Find Safe Spaces In Bournemouth Poole and Christchurch

Dorset Police and BCP Council have teamed up to remind the public where they can find immediate help, emergency assistance and support if they are concerned about their own and others safety this summer.

Seafront and town rangers, who patrol the beaches and the town centre area of Bournemouth, as well as security personnel and police officers have all stepped up their patrol operations as part of the summer response plan. They are on hand to provide immediate help and support to anyone with safety concerns, including contacting emergency services and helping to find lost friends or family.

RNLI lifeguards and staff can also be approached, with their beach towers serving as a safe place to address concerns or seek further help.

Specifically for missing children, the LV= KidZone wristband beach safety scheme is running throughout the summer to prevent and reunite missing and lost children and vulnerable adults. Visitors can collect a free wristband from LV= KidZone staff, seafront rangers and the RNLI lifeguard towers.

Neighbourhood Inspector Darren Harris, of Bournemouth police, said: “We would like to reassure our communities and visitors that we have strengthened our working practices with our partner agencies to collaboratively step up resources in town centres. Local officers will be conducting high-visibility patrols in the area of the beach in the coming days and this will continue throughout the summer months.

“It is important for people to remember that we are here for them and there is a vast range of agencies working across Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch this summer to help keep people safe. The Multi-Agency Command Centre (MACC) in Bournemouth means that we can ensure we can get the right resources to help people when needed.”

Councillor May Haynes, Portfolio Holder for Community Safety at BCP Council, said: “Public safety is one of our top priorities and we wish to make sure that our visitors and residents are aware of how they can not only help each other, but also themselves in emergency situations, along our seafront areas in BCP.

"I would urge our residents and visitors to use these services that are in place when they require assistance, such as a lost child or anti-social behaviour. By calling at these locations, they will receive the assistance they need as soon as possible."

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 24, 2021

How To Contact Dorset Police

Anyone wishing to contact us with non-emergency queries or reports can easily access our online options – Request a Call Back, Report Crime Online and Email 101.

Report Crime Online
- dorset.police.uk/reportcrime

Report Crime Online is an easy way to report information to us or report an incident or crime. Simply record all the details on the online form then submit the form via our website. Our contact centre staff will receive the form, record the crime, and provide you with a crime reference number.

Make an Enquiry Online - dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/make-an-enquiry-online/

If you want to make a general enquiry, tell us something, ask a question or report a suspicious incident (not happening now) then using the online enquiry form is an efficient way to make us aware of this information.

Alternatively, you can email us via 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk

Report Anti-Social Behaviour Online - dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/asb-and-nuisance-communications/

Use this online form to report anti-social behaviour, which is not happening now. This information allows us to build an intelligence picture of what is happening in your local area to help and support our communities.

Request a Call Back - dorset.police.uk/do-it-online/request-a-call-back/

Simply complete the details on the online form to Request a Call Back from Dorset Police the same day. Request a Call Back can be used to ask questions, report non-urgent crime and receive updates on existing crime.

Alternatively, our contact centre staff are available to answer your calls, day or night should you still wish to call the 101 non-emergency number.

Remember, in an emergency, when life is threatened, people are injured, offenders are nearby or immediate action is required, always dial 999.

Every contact received about a policing issue is answered by a member of the Force Command Centre whether it’s through the online channels or by phone. So whichever way you choose to contact the police, #ItsPersonal.

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Overall Crime Continues To Drop For Dorset Police

Dorset Police has seen a 13.4 per cent drop in recorded crime, according to new figures released on Thursday 22 July 2021, and has the ninth lowest crime rate in England & Wales.

Data released by the Office for National Statistics show the Force has continued to see a drop in overall crime for the fifth consecutive quarter.

The latest figures show that compared to the national data, Dorset saw a reduction in violence against the person offences – a reduction of 6.5 per cent in Dorset compared to an increase nationally of 0.5 per cent. Similarly, the Force experienced a reduction in sexual offences of 15.8 per cent, compared to a reduction of 9.2 per cent nationally.

Dorset Police recognises the impact of COVID-19 throughout the year and the effect the lockdown periods had on the reduction of some crime types. The Force responded to this and maintained a strong focus on the crimes that affect the most vulnerable members of our communities, for example, Child Sexual Exploitation, Domestic Abuse and County Lines.

Deputy Chief Constable Scott Chilton said Dorset continues to be one of the safest counties in the country to live and visit.

He continued: “We are now experiencing a very busy summer period in Dorset as a result of the easing of COVID-19 restrictions, the return of key public events, and set against the backdrop of limited international travel, and more and more people visiting Dorset for day trips and staycations. We have committed to resourcing the demand summer brings and working closely with our partners to ensure we continue to provide effective services to our communities and keep residents and visitors safe.

“The published data covers the pandemic in full and shows a steady reduction of crime throughout the year. It is a testament to the fortitude of our officers and staff in their response to the challenging policing environment they faced each day.”

The total number of crimes reported reduced from 54,176 to 46,916 over the 12 months to the end of March 2021, reducing 9.4 crimes per 1,000 of the population.

Violence with injury dropping by 16.9 per cent, compared to the national average that was down by 13.9 per cent.

In addition to the reduction in sexual offences, rape offences dropped by 16.1 per cent (compared to a national decrease of 5.5 per cent).
Public order offences saw an increase of 6.9 per cent, against a national increase of 5.2 per cent.

From Monday 19 July, Police in England have had a reduced role in the enforcement of Covid-19 restrictions. Many regulations have been revoked but the police may be called upon to enforce the remaining Health Protection Regulations. This change may have an impact on some reported crimes, particularly crimes that are linked to these regulation and some public order offences.

Deputy Chief Constable Scott Chilton said: “This 6.9 per cent increase in public order offences can partly be attributed to the increase in demonstrations that we have seen across the country in the last year and the public demonstrating their right to protest. Dorset Police work with protest organisers to ensure the maintenance of public safety and health.

I am proud of all our officers and staff, who have worked hard to support the public and keep our communities safe during this challenging year.”

David Sidwick, Dorset’s Police and Crime Commissioner, continued: “It’s hugely reassuring that during my first 100 days in office, we have official confirmation that crime rates in Dorset are continuing to fall.

“Residents should take great comfort in the news that we enjoy the ninth lowest crime rate in England and Wales, and these figures are testament to the incredible efforts of all the Dorset Police officers and staff who have worked so hard during a very difficult period. Obviously during COVID we have had an unusual year and crime patterns will have been affected - the clear need will be to keep driving down crime and anti-social behaviour as we return to normality.

“I’ve said consistently that I want Dorset to become the very safest part of the country, so these figures are encouraging and I look forward to working closely with the Force to ensure these numbers continue to plummet.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 22, 2021

Drink Drivers Targeted In Summer Crackdown

“If you are drinking, don’t drive and if you are driving, don’t drink.” That’s the message from Dorset Police as lockdown restrictions are lifted and more people are expected to be heading out to pubs and clubs.

The Force is urging people to take responsibility for their actions and not to risk lives by getting behind the wheel under the influence of alcohol.

As part of the six week-long campaign officers will be carrying out breath tests with those they suspect of drink driving, with offenders facing a minimum 12-month driving ban, an unlimited fine and a criminal record.

Dorset Police will be carrying out intelligence-led checks, which target road users who pose a risk on the roads with officers urging members of the public to get in touch to report anyone they suspect of driving under the influence.

Inspector Craig Tatton, of the Dorset Road Policing Team, said: “Despite long-term reductions, drink driving still contributes to over 200 deaths on our roads nationally each year and around 6,000 collisions where drivers were over the limit.

“During 2019 Dorset Police prosecuted 763 drivers for drink drive-related offences and a further 643 in 2020, despite lockdown restrictions and the closure of licenced premises for extended periods.

“There is no typical drink driver in Dorset – in the last three years the oldest person arrested for drink driving was 83 years old and the youngest was 16 years old.

“Alcohol impairs many of the functions necessary for safe driving; reaction times and spatial awareness are affected significantly and this is often still the case the morning after, depending on how much alcohol a person has consumed the night before and when they stopped drinking.

“It’s not just the driver who’s at risk, you could kill or seriously injure another person. Drink driving destroys people’s lives and those of their families. Avoid this happening by planning ahead; leave your vehicle at home, travel by taxi or public transport, or agree a non-drinking designated driver to get people home safely.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “With the interruption to the national summer drink drug drive campaign last year due to COVID-19, I felt it was particularly important that there was a campaign in place when lockdown restrictions were lifted.

“This campaign will not only target our most prolific offenders and high risk motorists, but will serve to remind all drivers about the responsibility we accept when we get behind the steering wheel, and the potential consequences when we don't take that responsibility seriously.”

Officers are encouraging people to report anyone they know are risking other people’s lives by getting behind the wheel when they’ve been drinking.

If you know someone who is a habitual drink driver please report them via 101, or if you know someone is about to drive under the influence please dial 999 immediately and give the make and model of the vehicle, registration number and direction of travel.

Download posters here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/news-information/article/12846

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Dorset Police Are Asking For Help In Tackling County Lines Over The Summer Months

As the summer holidays approach Dorset Police are asking local residents and holiday makers to know the signs of county lines and exploitation to help keep Dorset safe.

Superintendent Andy Dilworth explains: “County lines is a crime where a gang uses a dedicated mobile phone line to sell drugs. They often exploit children or vulnerable adults and force them to courier drugs and money. The “county line” refers to the mobile phone line which is the link for the drugs gangs to sell drugs.

“Dorset is always busy at this time of year with summer visitors enjoying our beautiful coastline and countryside. We know children and vulnerable adults exploited by gangs can get “lost in the crowd” during peak holiday season, which is why we are asking visitors and local people to know the signs and help us keep people safe. We also know that vulnerable children can be more at risk of exploitation by gangs during the long summer holiday as they are away from structured education.

“We are particularly asking for people who work in the holiday accommodation and hospitality industries, as well as taxi firms and bus and coach companies, to keep their eyes and ears open and, if they see something which doesn’t look right, to report it to us.”

Some of the signs of county line include children travelling long distances on public transport alone, paying for tickets with large amounts of cash or children with multiple mobile phones, tablets or SIM cards.

Superintendent Dilworth continues: “Please visit our website to find out about county lines and the signs to look out for. If you see anything that doesn’t look right, you can report it to us via our non-emergency channels or you can report it, 100% anonymously, to Crimestoppers.”

Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, David Sidwick said: “County lines gangs cause terrible problems in our county, not just by making drugs more readily available but by ruthlessly exploiting vulnerable and often young people. This is a problem I’m determined to tackle and will be a key focus of my police and crime plan.

“It is also an issue where the police need your help, so as visitors continue to come into the county please be aware of the signs of county lines exploitation, and let Dorset Police know if you see anything that concerns you.”

Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

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Operation To Drive Down Anti-Social Behaviour In Dorset

Dorset Police has launched a new robust operation aimed at tackling anti-social behaviour in its communities.

Operation Relentless aims to remind residents and visitors that the Force takes a tough approach to anti-social behaviour (ASB) and send a very clear message to those involved that it simply will not be tolerated in the county.

Overall reports of anti-social behaviour have fallen in Dorset over the last two years. However, it traditionally increases over the summer months and tackling it remains a Force priority.

Superintendent Alan Setchell, Force anti-social behaviour lead, said: “We know from speaking to our communities and from public surveys that anti-social behaviour is an ongoing issue and remains a real concern to residents and businesses.

“Anti-social behaviour is a very visible form of disruption in our communities and is closely linked to how safe people feel. When it is persistent it can have a significant impact on people’s lives.

“The Force has a number of operations already underway to tackle anti-social behaviour in hotspot areas across the county. Operation Relentless has been introduced to allow us to provide a clear and consistent message that we take reports of anti-social behaviour seriously and it is not acceptable.

“We want to empower our communities to help us fight this issue and take the anti away from anti-social by reporting incidents of anti-social behaviour involving loud, abusive, rowdy or intimidating alcohol-related behaviour, drug misuse and intimidating gangs of people to Dorset Police.

“We know that there is not one simple solution to all the issues anti-social behaviour can cause. Each policing area throughout Dorset has its own dedicated plan to tackle such activity and officers continue to work closely with the respective local authority to identify and reduce incidents. This year we have strengthened our links with partners even further by working directly alongside them in newly set up Multi Agency Command Centre in Bournemouth that co-ordinates summer resilience staff to hotspot areas across the BCP area and in Dorset County.”

The launch of Operation Relentless coincides with the UK’s first ASB awareness week, which runs from Monday 19 July to Sunday 25 July 2021.

David Sidwick, Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, said: “Tackling anti-social behaviour is a major priority of mine and I’m glad to see the Force is launching a major campaign to robustly deal with this issue within my first 100 days in the role.

“I’ve spoken to so many people across the county who have told me how their lives have been ruined by persistent nuisance, and dealing with these problems will be a major theme of my police and crime plan, which I will be launching in the autumn.

“It’s also important people realise that many anti-social behaviour problems are the responsibility of different agencies such as local authorities, with a survey by my office last year revealing a great deal of confusion over who was responsible for what. I’ll be working with all of these agencies to make sure we get this message across more clearly, but in the meantime I’d encourage everyone to visit the Dorset Police’s ASK NED pages online where they can get more information.”

You can report anti-social behaviour at www.dorset.police.uk or by calling Dorset Police on 101. As always in an emergency where life is at risk or a crime is being committed dial 999.

If we are not able to deal with your complaint directly, we will give you advice on which local agency can help and how to contact them. The police and other local agencies have a variety of different powers to tackle anti-social behaviour. As a guide local councils have the powers to deal with:

• Abandoned vehicles
• Graffiti and flyposting
• Damage to public property
• Rubbish and fly tipping
• Noise, including loud music, noisy neighbours, parties, alarms, animals and noise from pubs and clubs

You can find lots of advice on Dorset’s dedicated anti-social behaviour pages www.dorset.police.uk/help-advice-crime-prevention/safety-in-your-community/asb/ or by visiting Ask NED here: www.dorset.police.uk/contact-us/ask-ned-how-can-we-help/

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Help The Force This Summer By Going Online

Dorset Police is reminding people how they can help the Force this summer by going online should they need non-emergency help and advice.

The timely reminder comes at the start of the school summer holidays as it is expected the number of people visiting and staying in Dorset over the next few months will increase significantly, and therefore the number of people needing to contact the police will rise.

Demand has already risen this week compared to last week with a 11 per cent increase in 101 calls and 21 per cent increase in 999 calls. Alongside this, the Force is also managing a 35 per cent reduction in control room staff because they either have COVID-19 or coronavirus symptoms, or are having to self-isolate following a request by the NHS COVID-19 app or the Test and Trace telephone call. Unfortunately this will impact on waiting times when calling the 101 non-emergency number.

Every contact received about a policing issue is answered by a member of the Force Command Centre whether it’s through the online channels or by phone. So whichever way people choose to contact the police, #ItsPersonal.

Superintendent Jared Parkin, Head of Force Command Centre, said: “We have already been seeing an increase in non-emergency demand during the early part of the summer and we are anticipating this will continue to rise.

“Our online channels – email 101, make an enquiry online, request a call back and Report Crime Online ­– are simple and easy to use and provide an alternative to calling. They can also be accessed 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

“Our Force Command Centre manages the majority of contact we receive as a force and we try to respond to every contact as soon as we can. The personal service you receive through these online channels is just as good as the service you receive when calling 101.”

David Sidwick, Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, said: “Making it as easy as possible for local people to contact the police is one of my priorities, and so I’m glad to see Dorset Police launching this campaign within my first 100 days.

“I’ll be working closely with the Force over the next few years to make sure we continue to focus on boosting communication between the public and the police, but in the short term I will encourage Dorset residents and visitors to be aware of the different methods they can use to report crimes and incidents over the busy summer months.”

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 21, 2021

Campaign To Raise Awareness of Personal Responsibility To Prevent Violent Crime

Dorset Police is reminding everyone to enjoy their freedom this summer, behave responsibly and look after each other to prevent violent crime in the county.

The Force is launching its summer violent crime campaign – Don’t regret your night out – as the country prepares to fully reopen the night-time economy following the COVID-19 pandemic.

A series of posters and social media posts reminds people of the consequences of overdoing it on a night out or at home with friends when the toxic cocktail of alcohol and violence are mixed.

In a bid to keep residents and visitors safe this summer the Force is working closely with both BCP Council and Dorset Council to step up resources in town centres via additional police patrols, as well as an increase in security staff at licensed premises and community safety accredited officers from the council. To meet the increased demands of the summer, the Force has strengthened its working practices with partner agencies following the creation of Multi Agency Command Centres in Bournemouth and in west Dorset.

Reports of most serious violent offences, such as grievous bodily harm and wounding with intent, have fallen in Dorset over the last three years from 252 in 2018/19 to 226 in 2020/21.

Chief Superintendent Mark Callaghan, the Force’s lead on serious violence, said: “It has been a long and difficult 18 months for everyone, and we have finally reached the stage where most restrictions on our social lives are to be lifted. 

“We are delighted that people will be able to enjoy this newfound freedom and we welcome people back to our town centres with open arms. 

“Together with our partners we will do everything we can to keep people safe, however we are asking people to take some personal responsibility, look after each other and not get into situations where your behaviour can escalate into violence.

“There is no place in our communities for violence and we will do all we can to bring offenders to justice. If you commit a violent offence you can expect to get a criminal record, which could affect your career and reputation. Don’t regret your night out.

“Over the last year we have all been tested and our communities have come together and supported each other. Dorset is a family county and we want everyone to enjoy their time here and for it not to be ruined by the minority who cannot handle their drink or think violence is acceptable.

“Know when you have had enough to drink, plan how you are going to get home and look after your friends and family.”

David Sidwick, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “We have already seen some incredibly busy weekends across Dorset and with people flocking to the county over the next few months to enjoy our beaches and other attractions, the level of demand facing our police and other services is going to increase.

“I want everyone to enjoy the summer, but to stay safe and to drink responsibly. I also want our communities, particularly those living in coastal towns, to know that the Force will remain vigilant, alcohol related violent crime will not be tolerated and any offenders will be dealt with.”


Download poster here: 
https://www.dorset.police.uk/media/67012/violent-crime_bottle.jpg

Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

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Survey Seeks Views on Crime and Policing

Dorset’s Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick is launching a survey to ask residents for their views on crime and policing in the county.

Members of the public are being asked to complete the survey and provide information about what is important to them.

Go here to complete the survey online.

The survey is being launched as the Commissioner prepares his Police and Crime Plan, setting out a new strategic direction for Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner over the next three years.

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “This is your chance to tell me and Dorset Police what you want us to prioritise over the next few years.

“It will look at priorities derived from three years of campaigning and talking to the people of Dorset, which will form the basis for the plan, and now we need to check what you think about them – do you agree with them and do they align with your own values?”

Feedback from the survey will help shape the Police and Crime Plan, which will be in place by the autumn.

People completing the survey will be shown six different priority areas – from cutting crime and anti-social behaviour to making sure every penny counts – and asked to rate how important they think each one is.

The survey will also ask respondents whether they think the Commissioner’s overarching goal of making Dorset the safest county in England and Wales is a suitable ambition.

He said: “Remember, this plan is your plan. It sets the agenda for what the Force, as well as my own office, will focus on over the next three years.

“Therefore, it’s crucial that we get your thoughts and opinions to make sure local policing remains dynamic and responsive to the communities it serves.

“So please, take a moment to complete this survey. It takes just a couple of minutes to complete but the views we get will make a real difference.”



Message Sent By:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

July 16, 2021

Reminder As Legislation Bans The Possession of Dangerous Items In Private

Dorset Police is reminding the public of the dangers of carrying knives as new legislation comes into effect.

Changes to legislation brought about by the Offensive Weapons Act 2019 mean that from Wednesday 14 July 2021 all weapons banned in public by the Criminal Justice Act 1988, including zombie knives, shuriken or death stars and knuckledusters, will now also be banned in private, meaning people can no longer keep them at home.

Other sections of the act that have come into effect include an updated definition of flick knives to reflect changes in weapon designs, and the banning of private possession of flick knives and gravity knives.

The new legislation also affects specific firearms, such as rapid-fire rifles.

Anyone unlawfully possessing a firearm covered by the ban will face up to 10 years in prison and those possessing one of the other weapons can be sentenced to up to six months imprisonment or a fine, or both.

In 2020 the number of knife crimes reported to Dorset Police increased by 10.3 per cent from 272 in 2019 to 289. A quarter of victims were aged under 25.

The maximum penalty for an adult carrying a knife is four years in prison and an unlimited fine. You’ll get a prison sentence if you’re convicted of carrying a knife more than once.

Chief Superintendent Mark Callaghan, the Force’s strategic lead for violent crime, said: “The harm caused to families and communities through the tragic loss of life relating to knife crime is devastating and that is why knife crime remains a top priority for Dorset Police and we are committed to reducing knife crime offences in the county. These new measures will go some way to taking weapons off the streets and make it more difficult for people to get hold of knives and other dangerous items in the first place.

“Early intervention is key to making our communities safer and we work closely with our partner agencies to ensure that messages about the dangers and consequences of carrying a knife reaches children in schools and colleges.

“We want to provide support and advice to those who know a knife carrier and for parents, carers and bystanders to be able to spot the signs and speak out if they know someone is carrying a knife. We would encourage anyone with concerns to contact Dorset Police so we can take action and if appropriate put safeguarding measures in place to protect anyone who may be vulnerable.

“As part of the #KnivesRuinLives campaign we want to share the message that 'You matter, lives can change'.”

Councillor May Haines, BCP Council Portfolio Holder for Community Safety, said: “In light of the rising cases of knife crime across the BCP area, I welcome and support the legislation that is due to come into effect. I echo our police colleagues view that education and early intervention are key to helping keep our communities safe. Losing a loved one is heart-breaking but losing them to a violent crime makes it even harder to bear. Greater knowledge of how knife crime can negatively impact and take away lives, will prevent even more lives being lost and hopefully encourage people to change their behaviour when it comes to this issue that can have devastating consequences.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “Dorset has not experienced the same issues with knife crime which have been seen in some of our big cities, but I’m committed to reducing the number of incidents and ensuring these problems do not escalate here.

“These weapons have no place on our streets or in our schools and colleges and so I welcome this new legislation.

“We need to get the message out, particularly among young people, that there is no reason for anyone to carry a knife in Dorset and that there are serious consequences for those that do.”

If you believe someone is in immediate possession of a knife or offensive weapon please dial 999. If you would like to report your concerns about a knife carrier or need some advice, please email 101@dorset.pnn.police.uk or visit dorset.police.uk and report it online.

Unwanted knives can be disposed of at local recycling centres or safely packaged in your household waste.

Download poster here: https://www.dorset.police.uk/media/67010/offensive-weapons-act-public-poster.pdf


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 14, 2021

Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Yesterday officers attended Christchurch Railway Station following a report of 3 youths playing on the train track.
The British Transport Police are now dealing with this incident.
Please remind your children of the dangers of playing on a train track and keeping safe!
#5331 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice


Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

July 13, 2021

Christchurch Neighbourhood Policing Team

Today we attended an address to collect a GPS device that was found by a member of the public in Christchurch.
The device is worth about £400 but hadn't been reported missing or stolen.
We researched the addresses saved on the GPS and returned the device back all thanks to the honest member of public.
They were then given a reward by the owner.

We thought we would share the good news story as it brightened our day! #5331 #2729 #OnTheBeatDorset #christchurchpolice


Message Sent By:
Anna Lillywhite (Dorset Police, PCSO 5331, Christchurch West)

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Sling Your Hook Campaign Launched By Neighbourhood Watch To Tackle Scams

We are excited to tell you more about our SLING YOUR HOOK campaign running throughout July to help tackle scams

WHY ‘SLING YOUR HOOK’?
The campaign taps into the psychology that scammers use to hook people in, helping you stay one step ahead and protect yourself and your loved ones against the increasing variety of scams happening every day. We’ve identified the following five behaviours scammers commonly use:

They imply they’re doing you a favour (reciprocity)
They indicate everyone else is doing this (social proof)
They say your only chance is to act now (urgency)
They act like they’re similar to you, so you like them and want to please them (connection)
They ask you to do one little thing which makes you do more (commitment).


We also know that often victims of scams report that in hindsight they felt something wasn’t quite right at the time. This campaign aims to raise awareness of the tactics scammers use and encourages people to ‘stop and think’ if something doesn’t FEEL, SEEM, LOOK or SOUND right. This allows them time to trust your gut instinct and help prevent becoming a scam victim.

“Everyone likes to feel special. But watch out! If a stranger is going out of their way for you, something fishy may be going on instead. Scammers like to offer one-off deals and favours. Don’t be afraid to tell them no.” John Hayward-Cripps, CEO of Neighbourhood Watch Network

How can you support this campaign?

LEARN: Visit our scams website pages to learn more about common scams, preventing scams, reporting scams, supporting victims and a scams campaign toolkit

SHARE: Follow us on our Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn channels and share our posts. (Links below.)

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: Join us for an online talk (details below)

ONLINE TALKS
We are delivering a series of scams awareness online talks in partnership with the Dedicated Card and Payment Crime Unit (DCPCU), the National Trading Standards Scams Team (NTSST) and Avast.

Anyone can attend, but we are now running waiting lists only for all the webinars apart from one! Last week we ran an online talk on ‘Exploring the psychology behind scams and how scammers are so effective at their crimes’. It was so popular we have decided to re-run it on 27th July, 5pm. Click here to book your place. Please note – this event will not be recorded.

Keep safe,

Message Sent By:
Central Support Team (NWN, Neighbourhood Watch Network, England and Wales)

Follow us on our social channels ( ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn)
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349


July 10, 2021

Officers Tackle Illegal and Unsafe Use of E-Scooters

Officers took to the streets of Bournemouth to talk to riders of privately owned e-scooters to let them know where they can use them legally and safely.

A total of 18 riders were spoken to and issued with first warnings during the day of action on Thursday 1 July 2021. They now risk being reported for traffic offences and seizure of their e-scooter if they are stopped riding it illegally again.

E-scooters, or electric scooters, are two wheeled scooters that are propelled by a motor and have recently experienced a surge in popularity. The only place to legally ride a privately owned e-scooter is on private land with the owner or occupier’s permission. This means it is illegal to ride an e-scooter on roads, pavements, cycle lanes, beach promenades, bridleways, or any publicly accessible land, such as parks and car parks.

Concerned about the safety of the rider, pedestrians and other road users, Sergeant Rhys Griffiths said: “E-scooters have become a real issue for some local residents and complaints about improper use have increased among our communities. We are also seeing more people riding them as a result of the Government trials taking place. However, it still remains illegal to ride a privately owned e-scooter on any public land including pavements, roads and promenades.

“Riders could be committing an offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 and, if used on the pavement, the Highway Act 1835. In short, unless you’ve hired the e-scooter through a Government approved trial scheme you are not allowed to ride it on public land.”

The Government has announced locations throughout the UK, including Bournemouth and Poole, where e-scooter rental scheme trials are taking place. This allows individuals to hire an e-scooter from an official scheme and ride legally. Privately owned e-scooters are not part of this trial.

Phillip Ellis, CEO of Beryl, said: “Beryl's e-scooter scheme in Bournemouth and Poole provides the community with a green, convenient and enjoyable way for people to travel, providing a clear alternative to car journeys.

‘’As part of the Government's e-scooter trials, they are classed as a type of motor vehicle and require a valid driving licence, insurance and for users to abide by the rules of the road.

‘’All users of our service need to abide by these laws and are reminded to through safety reminders within our app as well as our terms and conditions. In any instance where our vehicles are being misused, Beryl reserves the right to ban the relevant people from our scheme and, where appropriate, will refer the matter to the police.

“We will continue to work with the council, police and other stakeholders to support the safe and responsible use of our vehicles.’’

Councillor Mike Greene, BCP Council’s portfolio holder for transport and sustainability, said: “From the beginning, our e-scooter rental trial with Beryl has ensured that suitable safety measures are in place on the e-scooters. These include a limited top speed and GPS tracking, so that the e-scooters’ speeds are automatically reduced to 3mph in Slow Go zones, like the seafront promenade during the current summer restrictions. Private e-scooters are without these safeguards so we fully support the enforcement action being taken by the police against their illegal use in the area.”

Sergeant Rhys Griffiths continued: “We want to make sure everyone enjoys this summer safely. Renting from the approved scheme means the e-scooters are used legally and Beryl can take extensive steps to keep riders, pedestrians and other road users safe.”

Officers will continue to approach those riding an e-scooter on public land and inform them of the law. They will take down the details of the riders and explain where and how e-scooters can be used.

If you are using your e-scooter on public land, you should stop doing so immediately. Your e-scooter could be seized, and you could be liable for prosecution for traffic offences.

David Sidwick, Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset, said: “The use of e-scooters has shot up over the last few months and I know from talking to members of the public that a lot of people are very concerned about them – particularly when they’re ridden along pavements and cycle lanes.

“I’m very pleased to see Dorset Police taking proactive steps to tell riders exactly where and how they are allowed to use their e-scooters. This advice is very clear and there should be no excuse for anyone riding one of these scooters illegally anywhere in our county.

“I’d also like to echo the warning given by officers that if anyone persists in using their e-scooter on public land, the device could be seized, and they could be prosecuted.”

What are the rules around privately owned e-scooters?

The only place you can ride a privately-owned e-scooter is on private land with the landowner’s permission.
It is against the law to ride an e-scooter on any public land. This includes roads, pavements, cycle lanes, beach promenades, bridleways, or any publicly accessible land such as parks and car parks.
An e-scooter is classed as a powered transporter and they are treated as a motor vehicle and fall under the Road Traffic Act 1988. They are subject to the same legal requirements as motor vehicles. This includes MOT, tax, licensing, insurance, and specific construction regulations.
If you are caught using an e-scooter on a public road, pavement, or other prohibited space you are committing a criminal offence and could be prosecuted.
Your e-scooter could be seized, you could end up with a fine, penalty points or even disqualification from driving.

The Government is running trials for renting e-scooters. To find out if these are taking place in an area near you go to their website: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/e-scooter-trials-guidance-for-users
You can find out more about e-scooters and powered transporters here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/powered-transporters/information-sheet-guidance-on-powered-transporters

Beryl as an operator of hired scooters provide insurance for their riders and third party liability cover. This insurance remains valid so long as riders are following the rules. For more information visit the website: https://beryl.cc/news/beryl-e-scooters-join-the-family


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 7, 2021

Multi-Agency Operation To Tackle Anti-Social Behaviour In The Water Off Poole Bournemouth and Christchurch

Multi-agency water-based patrols have taken place to target anti-social and irresponsible behaviour in Poole Harbour and along beaches in Bournemouth and Christchurch into Christchurch Harbour.

Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs) from Dorset Police teamed up with colleagues from BCP Council and Poole Harbour Commissioners on Saturday 3 July 2021 as part of the Force’s first Operation Seagoing.

The operation was launched in response to complaints and concerns from the public about anti-social behaviour involving people using personal watercrafts, including small speed boats, wet bikes and jet skis. Targeted patrols will be carried out in the two areas until September.

There is a 10-knot speed limit in Poole Harbour and anyone found breaking this could be fined up to £1,000 by Poole Harbour Commissioners.

In Poole Bay beach goers and people using personal watercrafts will see yellow buoys along the seafront of BCP beaches. These are placed 200m from the shoreline and set out where people can swim safely. People using personal watercrafts are able to enter that zone, but they must ride the watercraft at six knots or less in Bournemouth and Poole and eight in Christchurch, which is a walking pace.

Police Sergeant Sophie Williams, of Poole Neighbourhood Policing Team, said: “There are a lot of very responsible personal watercraft users that already work with authorities, supplying information and intelligence against those behaving dangerously. We want people to enjoy our fantastic harbour, beaches and water this summer and we are committed to working with our partners to make sure no one comes to harm.

“Anyone using a personal watercraft needs to ensure they respect all water users, behave responsibly and be mindful that people are swimming in the sea. Some people see the harbour simply as large open space, but it is the largest natural harbour in Europe, it is home to over 300 different species of birds and 7,000 yachts are permanently moored there. It needs to be treated as an extension of the town and we wouldn’t expect people to behave like this when travelling along a high street or precinct.

“Inappropriate or dangerous use of any type of watercraft or small boat will not be tolerated in our county. If people are found to be flouting the rules we, or our partner agencies, will take robust action against them and they could end up in court and with a heavy fine.”

Anyone using a watercraft or driving a motorised boat should follow a few simple steps:

See who else is in the water. The water is a shared space, but swimmers are hard to spot.
Look out for wildlife. Don’t harass or cause disturbance. We have some fabulous wildlife in the sea that can be harmed by noise, speed and aggressive behaviour.
Observe the sea conditions. They constantly change and can be unpredictable. The tide comes in and goes out two times a day at different times with the water moving in toward the beach or moving out away from the beach. Make sure you know what direction the water is moving in throughout the day. Check tide times, weather forecast and sea conditions before you leave home.
Watch your speed. From the shore to the yellow speed marker buoys the speed limit is six knots (assume 5mph) – they are there for a reason. Where possible, for your safety and others we would suggest you remain on the seaward of the buoys.

Sophie Ricketts, Head of Seasonal Response at BCP Council, said: “BCP Council is working with Dorset Police, the RNLI and harbourmaster colleagues to address water based anti-social behaviour and remind water users of the relevant byelaws. We encourage all personal watercraft users to act responsibly and ensure they are mindful of swimmers and other water users.”

Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner David Sidwick said: “I am aware of the problems these small watercrafts can cause if they are used irresponsibly, and I know this can have an impact on boat users as well as people living close to our harbours and beaches.

“People need to be aware that using small watercrafts in an irresponsible way doesn’t just cause a nuisance to others – it can be incredibly dangerous.

“Poole Harbour is one of our county’s greatest natural resources and I’m very glad to see the Force working so closely with partner agencies on this operation, ensuring it can be enjoyed by everyone throughout the summer.”

Poole Harbour Commissioners (PHC) Harbour Master, Captain Brian Murphy said: “Every year the majority of byelaw offences in Poole Harbour are due to the reckless behaviour of a minority of personal watercraft users.

“PHC has had mitigation in place since personal watercrafts were first introduced to the market. This includes a designated area, byelaw enforcement, permit to operate with associated terms and conditions, CCTV, patrols including joint patrols with Dorset Police and SIFCA and signage. We have seen a significant increase in the number of permit holders over the past two years, increasing by 50 per cent each year, which seems to be aligned with the easement of COVID-19 lockdowns.

“This large increase in numbers has resulted in a similar increase in the number of byelaw infringement reports received from patrol officers and other harbour users, which has led to additional mitigation. This includes an additional patrol officer, voluntary task force, slipway facility and manning, additional CCTV, updated signage, updated code of conduct, body cameras and an increase in joint patrols, including multi-agency work.

“PHC very much welcomes the additional resources from other agencies to supplement existing measures.

“Every year there are a number of warning letters issued to personal watercraft users and unfortunately a number find themselves in the magistrates’ court facing significant fines and costs. It is very important that personal watercraft users fully understand the requirements before deciding to visit Poole Harbour and therefore all personal watercraft users are encouraged to visit the PHC website www.phc.co.uk or contact the harbour office on 01202 440210.”


Message Sent By:
Julie Heath (Dorset Police, Neighbourhood Alert Officer, Dorset)

July 2, 2021

Your Voice Matters Survey

Dear Resident,

It is now the time of year for the Neighbourhood Policing Team Priority Surveys to begin running, to help feed into the new priorities we will launch after the summer.

Our Priorities are set every 6 months, with a review and update every quarter.
You can view the current priorities on our webpages:
Click Here

You may have already taken part in our survey at the start of the year. This helped us set the priorities we are currently working towards at the moment.

If you want to feed into the new priorities, to be launched after the summer, you can do so by following the link: Click Here


Thank you

Message Sent By:
Dom Smith (Dorset Police, NEO 5390, Bournemouth & Christchurch NEO)

-----------------------------------------------
Do You Know What A Ghost Broker is?

Just 15% of people have heard of a ‘ghost broker’.* Do you know what one is?
Have you ever heard of a ‘ghost broker’? No, we are not talking about things that go bump in the night – this is a lot scarier. ‘Ghost brokers’ are fraudsters who sell fake or invalid car insurance policies. Victims are sold fake insurance documents for a policy that does not exist, or for a genuine policy that has been set up using false details to lower the price of the premium.

How do ‘ghost brokers’ operate?
Fraudsters lure victims in with the offer of cheaper insurance premiums, usually via social media or by word-of-mouth. These individuals or groups pose as middlemen for well-known insurance companies, claiming they can offer you legitimate car insurance at a significantly cheaper price.

This type of fraud is typically carried out either by forging insurance documents, falsifying your details to bring the price down, or by taking out a genuine policy for you but cancelling it soon after.

Often, the victim is not aware that they have been scammed until they are involved in an accident and try to claim on the policy.

Who do ‘ghost brokers’ target?
‘Ghost brokers’ tend to target vulnerable communities, including members of non-English speaking communities who may not have full knowledge of UK insurance and laws, as well as young people looking for cheaper insurance deals.

Last year, Action Fraud received 694 reports of ‘ghost broking’, with almost a third (29%) coming from victims aged 17-29. The reported losses for these victims alone totalled £113,500, with each individual losing an average of £559.

Figures also indicate that over half (58%) of all reports in 2020 were submitted by men.

What could happen if I drive without valid insurance?
As policies sold by ‘ghost brokers’ are either invalid, non-existent or fraudulent, this means that the driver is technically uninsured, meaning that you could face:

£300 fixed penalty notice
Six points on driving licence
Vehicle being seized and crushed

How can I protect myself from ‘ghost brokers’?
There are simple steps that you can take to spot the signs of these scams and avoid being taking for a ride by ‘ghost brokers’:

‘Ghost brokers’ often advertise and communicate via social media, online forums and messaging apps. If a broker is only using a mobile phone or email as a way of contact, this can be a sign of this type of crime. Fraudsters do not want to be traced after they have taken money from their victims.
They may also try to sell insurance policies through print adverts in pubs, clubs or bars, newsagents
If a deal seems too good to be true, then it probably is. If you are not sure about the broker, check on the Financial Conduct Authority or the British Insurance Brokers’ Association website for a list of all authorised insurance brokers. You can also contact the insurance company directly to verify the broker’s details. You can also check to see if a car appears to be insured on the Motor Insurance Database website.
If you think that you have been a victim of a ghost broker, you can report your concerns to Action Fraud at actionfraud.police.uk or on 0300 123 2040.
You can also contact the Insurance Fraud Bureau via its confidential Cheatline on 0800 422 0421 or on the IFB website.

*According to a YouGov survey commissioned by the IFB

Message Sent By:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)


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