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Neighbourhood Alert Reports
If you have any information regarding these incidents please call the Dorset Police on 01202/01305 222222 or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.
Neighbourhood Alert reports are now as received from the Police Coordinator, and not edited by me.


January 18, 2018

Message sent by:
Stan Mackrell (Dorset Police, PCSO 6119, Highcliffe and Walkford, Mudeford and West Highcliffe)


This is a message that relates to a recent burglary, that occurred in Falcon Drive on the 12 Jan 2018, between 16:00hrs (4pm) and 19:30hrs (7:30pm), and between numbers 21 and 35 Falcon Drive.

The elderly victim was out for a few hours, and upon their return discovered the break.

Point of Entry (POE) was via a rear glass door, and an untidy search ensued in the bedroom of the property -- nothing has been taken.

The fact that nothing has been taken and the untidy search took place, may suggest this was either an opportunist offence, or alternatively the offenders may have been disturbed at some point, neither can be corroborated.

Please remain vigilant at al times and report anything suspicious via the Dorset Police non-emergency 101 service or if a crime is being committed please use the 999 service.

January 15, 2018

Message sent by:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

Dear residents,

As many of you will know, we are now well underway with our annual precept consultation.

This year, I have been asking residents whether they would be prepared to pay an additional £1 per month to support policing in Dorset. This is the amount that the Policing Minister has suggested Police & Crime Commissioners raise the policing precept by, in order to meet unprecedented challenges facing the service.

I would like to thank all those who have already completed the consultation. If you have not done so yet, you have until Sunday 28 January 2018.

Click here to have your say now!

My team and I have been out and about directly engaging with residents at a number of locations across the county on this important issue. We will be continuing our roadshow consultation events this week and I look forward to discussing police funding with as many local people as possible. Visit my website for details.

If you would like to share your views or ask any questions, I will be hosting a live web chat tomorrow, Tuesday 16 January 2018, from 6pm – 7pm.

The web chat will be available here.

Click the link now to set yourself an email reminder.

If you aren’t able to join the chat live, the discussion will be available at the link above for you to revisit. If you would like to submit a question in advance, please email pcc@dorset.pnn.police.uk

Thank you.



Martyn Underhill
Dorset Police & Crime Commissioner


January 9, 2018

Message sent by:
Stan Mackrell (Dorset Police, PCSO 6119, Highcliffe and Walkford, Mudeford and West Highcliffe)

Unfortunately our burglary status has changed over the past 48 hours to a recent break.

A break has occurred in the Smugglers Wood Road area between numbers 17 and 27, between 15:05 and 18:05hrs Sunday 7th January 2018.

POE was via a lower pain of glass the back door - an untidy search has occurred throughout the property, but at this point we believe only decorative jewellery has been taken, enquiries are on-going.

May I take this opportunity to reinforce and remind everyone to remain extra vigilant at all times, and to report any suspicious activity in the area via the 101 non-emergency number, or if you believe a crime is being committed please use the 999 service.

Please ensure you property is properly secured at all times, even if you are in, additionally if the property is alarmed, please use this each time you go out, and ensure all windows remain closed and secure... If you are going away for any length of time, consider informing family, friends or a neighbour (if appropriate) and leave a key with them.

Lock your vehicles in a the garage, and ensure side gates, are secured and consider advising your local home-watch co-ordinator (if applicable), and leave a message for your local NPT, and we will endeavour to pay passing attention while the property is empty.

Let's try and nip this in the bud, if we have had one break it may indicate an added interest in your area.

Thank You
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Message sent by:
Communications Team (Dorset Police, CED, Dorset)

A scam in which fraudsters contact parents for private schooling fees has been brought to the attention of Dorset Police.

The scam begins with criminals emailing parents with payment instructions for due schooling fees. The emails are sent from the school’s own compromised email system, although there have been instances of a similar address being used.

Once the victim has transfered funds into the fraudster’s account, the money is moved on before the fraud is identified. In several cases, there has been evidence of social engineering at play within the email, with the criminal suggesting a discount if parents pay early.

While there have been no reported cases in Dorset to date, the alert serves as a reminder to exercise caution when making transactions online.

For information and advice about scams in Dorset, go to the Fraud Alert page of our website - dorset.police.uk/fraud. Scams should be reported to Action Fraud (the national fraud and cyber-crime reporting centre) on 0300 123 2040.

Alternatively you can sign up to Action Fraud Alert to receive direct, verified and accurate information about scams and fraud in your area by email, recorded voice and text message.


January 8, 2018

Message sent by:
Stan Mackrell (Dorset Police, PCSO 6119, Highcliffe and Walkford, Mudeford and West Highcliffe)

Damage was to a parked motor vehicle, between 06:20am and 16:30hrs yesterday, a lengthy scratch from the front to rear offside of the vehicle - victim also indicates similar damage to two other vehicles, parked in the same area - if anyone has any information in relation to these crimes, please contact Dorset Police via the 101 service quoting Incident 04:0284.


I have been asked to mention the restrictions that have been put in place along the promenade between the Noisy Lobster Restaurant and Friars Cliff end of the Avon Run Road.... The Beach staff are removing 30-40 Beach Huts in time for the proposed construction work starting later this month, in relation to the promenade.

Please use the beach area rather than the promenade, as the restrictions are in place for the public's safety, and in using the beach area, the work in removing the huts can proceed quickly and with the minimum of fuss to both the public and beach staff.

Thank You for your co-operation in this.

December 20, 2017

Message sent by:
Communications Team (Dorset Police, CED, Dorset)

Scam warning - Residents are being asked to take part in an undercover fraud investigation at a local branch of a bank.

A scam in which criminals pose as police officers or members of a bank’s fraud team and ask people to take part in a fake undercover operation has been brought to the attention of Dorset Police.

The scam begins with fraudsters making contact with their target, usually by phone, and stating they are a police officer or, in some cases a member of the fraud team with their bank. The criminal will state they are investigating a fraud at a local branch where staff are suspected of being complicit, including issuing fake bank notes, and ask the person for their help in the operation.

As part of the scam, they will be asked to visit the branch and withdraw a substantial sum, often thousands of pounds, so that the cash can be analysed by police and reassured the money will be returned at the end of the operation. However, once the money is handed over, the fraudster disappears.

In another version, the criminal convinces the target to transfer money to a so-called ‘safe account’ to protect their funds from ‘corrupt’ bank staff. However, the account is in fact controlled by the criminal.

The criminal instructs their victim not to discuss the case with anyone in the branch, giving them plausible explanations as to why they are withdrawing the money. As a result, despite being questioned by bank staff, the victim will take out cash, convinced that the staff are part of a fraud.

Dorset Police is offering prevention advice in a bid to combat the scam, which has been reported throughout the UK but not in Dorset to date.

Detective Inspector Neil Wright, of Dorset Police's Priority and Volume Crime team, said: “Scams such as this work because fraudsters are so convincing. We will never ask anyone to carry out any investigative work for us, or withdraw their own money and neither will your bank. If you receive any phone call you’re not sure about, please just hang up.”

Advice to consumers on how to avoid this scam:

The police will never ask you to become part of an undercover investigation or for you to withdraw cash and hand it to them for safe-keeping.

Be wary of any calls, texts or emails purporting to be from the police asking for your personal or financial details, or for you to transfer money.

If you are approached, or feel something is suspicious, hang up the phone and don’t reply.

For information and advice about scams in Dorset, go to the Fraud Alert page of our website - dorset.police.uk/fraud. Scams should be reported to http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/ (the national fraud and cyber-crime reporting centre) on 0300 123 2040.

Alternatively you can sign up to Action Fraud Alert to receive direct, verified and accurate information about scams and fraud in your area by email, recorded voice and text message.
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Message sent by:
Communications Team (Dorset Police, CED, Dorset


Ground breaking rapid response scheme – the Banking Protocol – means local branch staff can alert police and trading standards to suspected fraud taking place.

The scheme was launched in Dorset in June 2017. Since then almost £140,000 of fraud has been prevented.

Figures from UK Finance show that nationally, the protocol has stopped more than £9 million being passed to criminals in its first year of operation and 101 arrests have been made.

This fraud prevention scheme is aimed at identifying and protecting potential fraud victims when they visit a bank or building society branch.

The Banking Protocol, developed as a partnership between the finance industry, police and trading standards, enables bank staff to contact police if they suspect a customer is in the process of being scammed, with a rapid response to the branch.

The Banking Protocol was first launched in October 2016 with a pilot in London before a national rollout began in May. Dorset Police launched the scheme in June.

It is in place in 43 police forces across the country, with all remaining forces in the UK committed to introducing it.

Nationally, in the 12 months since the pilot was launched until the end of October 2017, the Banking Protocol has prevented £9.1 million of fraud, with individual customers protected from losing sums from £99 up to £212,000.

So far, the scheme has led to 101 arrests being made across the country, with police responding to a total of 1,262 Banking Protocol calls.

Katy Worobec, Managing Director of Economic Crime at UK Finance, said: “Fraud can have a devastating effect on some of the most susceptible people in society and it’s by working together with law enforcement, and others, that we can make a real difference when it matters most.

"The Banking Protocol is a great example of this collaboration in action, protecting people from becoming victims. The finance industry is determined to crack down on fraud and is taking action on all fronts - the protocol is an important weapon in our armoury.”

UK Finance has led the development and implementation of the Banking Protocol with support from the National Trading Standards Scam team and the Joint Fraud Taskforce. As well as stopping frauds taking place, the scheme ensures a consistent response to potential victims and gives them extra support to prevent them becoming a victim in the future. The Post Office is also part of the Protocol.

Detective Inspector Neil Wright from the Volume Crime Team in Dorset said: “This scheme is part of a larger force campaign designed to identify and support vulnerable residents of Dorset and prevent them from becoming victims of fraud.

"We aim to raise awareness of fraud within our communities through our Neighbourhood Policing Teams and the media, encouraging people to take preventative steps.

"The banking protocol will ensure banks and police are more active in protecting customers by spotting scams before any money has been handed over. This will go a long way to reducing financial crime."
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Message sent by:
Kristian Ward (Communications Officer, Communications and Engagement, Dorset Police)

As part of a safety campaign, the Force will be offering members of the public a unique insight into what policing on a Friday night in Bournemouth town centre involves.

Dorset Police is issuing advice around safety in the night-time economy, which forms part of the wider #ThisChristmas festive crime prevention campaign.


This Friday evening from 6pm, members of the public will be able to follow the work of PC Anthony Berry and PC Adam Steeves via the hashtag #DPNightOut on Twitter (@DorsetPolice), Facebook (Dorset Police) and Instagram (Dorset_Police).


Superintendent Jared Parkin, Commander for Bournemouth police, said: “We are running this campaign to raise awareness of the importance of staying safe from harm while on a night out.

“We know that Christmas is a perfect time to go out celebrating with friends and family, and this social media event is a fantastic opportunity to share our work with the public and get their take on how Dorset Police is protecting them while they are out enjoying themselves this Christmas.

“The last thing we want to do is stop anyone having fun. We just want to encourage people to consider their personal safety before going on a night out and to make decisions during the night that do not put themselves or others in danger.

“Excessive drinking lowers your inhibitions and can result in you doing things you may later regret. It also affects your senses and can make you less aware of potential dangers. This can lead to people getting themselves into trouble with the law and makes them more likely to be a victim of crime. Please follow our advice and help Dorset Police keep our night time communities safe.”


Follow the hashtag #DPNightOut on Twitter (@DorsetPolice), Facebook (Dorset Police) and Instagram (Dorset_Police) this Friday from 6pm.

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Message sent by:
PCC Communications (Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, Communications and Engagement, Dorset)

In England and Wales, the limit for drivers is 80 milligrams of alcohol for every 100 millilitres of blood in the body. This is the most generous legal drink drive threshold in Europe.

I am keen to ensure that the views of local people are at the forefront of discussions I have with the Department for Transport on this matter, and I encourage you to click the link below to complete my short survey on the drink drive limit:

TAKE PART IN THE CONSULTATION

Already in 2017, Dorset has sadly seen the number of road deaths reach a higher level than for the full year of 2016. Over a quarter of these fatalities involved a motorist driving whilst under the influence of alcohol, drugs or both.

The law should give drivers clear and conclusive guidance on how much alcohol they can safely and legally consume. As it stands, I am convinced that our generous limit creates confusion. Drivers are left to guess at how much alcohol is acceptable and whether a half pint more will send them over the limit. Nobody can conclusively say how much is too much.

In contrast, the lower limit adopted by many European countries means that one drink could cost you your licence. I believe that adopting this in England and Wales would more effectively deter motorists from drinking at all before getting behind the wheel.

I hope to hear from as many local people as possible, and thank you in advance for sharing your thoughts.

TAKE PART IN THE CONSULTATION

Martyn Underhill, Dorset Police & Crime Commissioner

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Message sent by:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Individuals and businesses are being warned to watch out for cold calls and online contact from fraudsters who are offering victims the opportunity to apply for Government grants for an advance fee.

To make the grants look legitimate fraudsters have set up bogus companies and convincing looking websites that claim to be operating on behalf of the UK Government.

Fraudsters cold call businesses and individuals offering the grant and if they’re interested direct them to fill out an online application form with their personal information.

Once the fraudsters have that information they’ll contact back victims and congratulate them on being accepted onto the grant programme.

Pre-paid credit cards

Applicants are then asked to provide identification and are instructed to get a pre-paid credit card to deposit their own contribution to the fake Government grant scheme. Fraudsters will then contact victims on the phone or are emailed and asked for the details of their pre-paid credit card and copies of statements to in order for them to add the grant funds.

Of course the grant funds are never given by the fraudsters and the money that’s been loaded by the victim onto the card is stolen.

If you receive one of these calls, hang up immediately and report it to us. We’ve already taken down one website fraudsters have been using to commit this fraud and are working with Companies House to combat this issue.

How to protect yourself:

Be wary of unsolicited callers implying that you can apply for grants. You should never have to pay to receive a government grant, and they definitely won’t instruct you to obtain a pre-paid credit card. The government should have all the information they need if a genuine grant application was submitted, therefore any requests for personal or banking information either over the phone or online should be refused.


What to do if you’re a victim:


If you think your bank or personal details have been compromised or if you believe you have been defrauded contact your bank immediately.
Stop all communication with the ‘agency’ but make a note of their details and report it to Action Fraud.
If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/ or by calling 0300 123 2040.

The information contained within this alert is based on information from gathered by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB). The purpose of this alert is to increase awareness of this type of fraud. The alert is aimed at members of the public, local police forces, businesses and governmental agencies.
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Message sent by:
Kristian Ward (Communications Officer, Communications and Engagement, Dorset Police)


Planning on getting someone a drone #ThisChristmas?

Help them get to 400 feet by signing them up to one of our 'Safer Drones' courses in January held in Ferndown.

For more information click on the below attachment and to sign up, email: saferdrones@dorset.pnn.police.uk

Attachments
SAfer_Drones_Course_Dorset_A4_Poster-1.jpg - 373.2 KB


November 17, 2017

Message sent by:
Communications Team (Dorset Police, CED, Dorset)

A BT internet scam is affecting residents in Dorset

Many reports have been made from residents across Dorset stating that people claiming to be from BT Open Reach are asking for remote access to computers to 'make checks' on things like connection speed, routers and security software.

These people are convincing and quite insistent.

To offer reassurance about the legitimacy of the request, people are being provided with a telephone number to call. Once the number given is dialled it is answered by a supposed BT operator. Please be aware – this is not a trusted way to verify a caller’s identity. Always use the company contact number found on a utility bill or correspondence from that company. Never trust a number given to you over the phone to confirm identity.

Please don't engage with these people, just terminate the call.

Please, pass this message to your friends and family members. Stay alert and be aware of this newest scam.
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Message sent by:
Communications Team (Dorset Police, CED, Dorset)

Scam warning - Residents are being asked to pay tax due to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) in iTunes vouchers.

Dorset Police has been made aware of a scam whereby individuals are being contacted, in a variety of methods, and told they owe an outstanding debt to HMRC.

In one day, 13 reports were made to Dorset Police from residents, primarily in the North and East of the county.

Detective Inspector Neil Wright, Force Volume Crime Unit, said: "I urge residents to be aware of this trend affecting Dorset. Tell your loved ones, your neighbours and your colleagues.

"This is a scam. HMRC will never ask you for iTunes vouchers or anything else similar as payment for unpaid tax.

"If you receive a suspicious call just hang up. Don't engage with these people as it just gives them more opportunities to pull you in."

iTunes gift cards are becoming more popular as a way to collect money from victims because they are easy to redeem and quick to sell on.

You do not need to be in possession of the physical card to redeem the value. Often victims are asked to read out the serial code on the back over the phone which instantly credits their account.

A HMRC spokesperson said: “HMRC takes security extremely seriously. We are aware that some people have received telephone calls from individuals claiming to be from HMRC. We have a well-known brand, which criminals abuse, to add credibility to their scams.

“We recommend if you cannot verify the identity of a caller, do not speak to them. We encourage you to check GOV.UK for information on how to avoid and report scams, recognise genuine HMRC contact and make payments to HMRC.”

If you are suspicious of an email or text claiming to be from HMRC, please send it to phishing@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk so it can be checked.

For information and advice about scams in Dorset, go to the Fraud Alert page of our website - dorset.police.uk/fraud. Scams should be reported to Action Fraud (the national fraud and cyber crime reporting centre) on 0300 123 2040.

Alternatively you can sign up to Action Fraud Alert to receive direct, verified and accurate information about scams and fraud in your area by email, recorded voice and text message.

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Message sent by:
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) has identified a number of reports where job seekers are being targeted by fraudsters trying to obtain personal and banking details from them, or requesting money to secure accommodation.

Individuals registering with job seeking websites or searching for jobs on The Student Room website are being contacted by bogus recruitment companies/businesses asking them to complete application and interview forms which request personal details and banking details, as well as copies of identity documents.

In some instances the applicant is invited along for interview, either in person or over the phone, to make the process look as legitimate as possible. This is impacting on students and graduates looking for work both in the UK and overseas. Some job seekers, as well as divulging personal details, have paid money to the fraudsters in order to secure a bogus rental property alongside the job offer.

How to protect yourself:

Check emails and documents from the recruiter for poor spelling and grammar – this is often a sign that fraudsters are at work.
If visa fees are mentioned, ask the embassy representing the country where you believe you will be working how to obtain a visa and how much it costs. Check that the answers the potential employer or recruiter gave you are the same – if they’re not, it may be a sign of fraud.
Carry out thorough research to confirm that the organisation offering you the job actually exists. If it does exist, contact the organisation directly using contact details obtained through your own research or their website to confirm the job offer is genuine.

What to do if you’re a victim:

If you think your bank details have been compromised or if you believe you have been defrauded contact your bank immediately.
Stop all communication with the ‘agency’ but make a note of their details and report it to Action Fraud.
Warn the operators of the job website you used that their site is being used by fraudsters.
If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/ or by calling 0300 123 2040.

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Message sent by:
Communications Team (Dorset Police, CED, Dorset)

Fraud and scams are unfortunately a very real threat in Dorset at the moment.

Dorset Police is aware of a HMRC scam asking individuals to use ‘iTunes vouchers’, or similar products, to pay any tax due. Some people have received telephone calls from people claiming to be from HMRC; these bogus callers may encourage you to provide bank account or personal details for alleged tax debts, in exchange for ‘tax advice’ or a bogus refund.

We have had 13 reports of HMRC scams in North and East Dorset on Thursday last week.

If you cannot verify the identity of the caller, please do not speak to them. Please report any incidents like this to Action Fraud.

HMRC will never request tax debts to be paid in payment vouchers and we are clear that they cannot be used to pay tax.




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